PH101 Does my diet really matter?

Fiona McMahon, DPT

Gluten free, soy free, low FODMAP. It’s amazing how many diets there are out there that really can  provide people with symptom relief. If you are suffering with chronic pain you may be confused on where to start, or what is right for you. You also may have tried out a bunch of different ways of eating, not seen results and have gotten really frustrated. If this is the case for you, I highly encourage you to come to our next pelvic health seminar on October 27th at 7pm, “Does my diet really matter”.

jessica-drummond-headshot-197x300This seminar will be hosted by a special guest speaker, nutritionist Jessica Drummond. Jessica Drummond is a former pelvic floor physical therapist who now specializes in nutrition for those suffering with pelvic floor dysfunction. This seminar was a hit last year and is a great starting point for those considering adding nutrition as part of their healing journey.




Register at  today.


110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY


Pelvic Health 101 Fall- (003)

BBPT Health Tips: Let’s Roll!

Fiona McMahon DPT,

Foam rolling. I certainly have a love hate relationship with my foam roller. My IT bands (the tissue on the side of your leg) hate it, but I love how it keeps my knees and joints happy. Foam rolling is a method to release knots in muscle and improve the mobility of tight muscles and joints. If you are a gym rat, runner, or athlete of any kind, consider giving foam rolling a try. In a review published in the International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy in 2015, foam rolling was shown to reduces delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), and temporarily increase range of motion.

First of choose your weapon…. I mean roller.


White roller: Great for starters: gentle, but can deform over time because it is softer.


foamroller6x36fsBlack roller: This roller is not for the faint of heart, it’s the toughest one of the bunch. It’s not a great place to start, nor is it good if you bruise easily, but for the foam roller aficionados out there, it is really great for a tight IT band and hamstring.



21nc-kpj2l-_sy300_Grey roller: This is a nice in between roller for those of us who need a little more than the white roller, but aren’t quite ready for the black one. It is actually a composite of both rollers.




Artisanal Foam Roller: This one retails for about 120$ on Amazon and is good if you are super fancy. I haven’t tried it because I’m not very fancy.13187983_252069785150011_953005372_n


The Stick and other hand rollers:


48d2a548-59cd-437f-b9a1-7a145ae1e592This one is good for those who travel often, because it occupies relatively low amounts of space in carry-on luggage. It is also great for people with tight inner thighs and tightness closer to the pelvic bone, which can be difficult to get to using regular foam rollers. Retail names include: “The stick”, “the tiger tail”, and others.

Other Rollers:

There are other rollers that come in a variety of fun colors and designs. These rollers are less standardized so you may want to experiment if you feel like opting for one of the less classic varieties.


Now that you’ve picked your roller, let’s get rolling!

When foam rolling, you can adjust the weight you place on the roller by reducing the amount of support you give yourself. The more of your body weight you put on the foam roller, the more intense it will be.  If you find a particularly tender part oscillate your body on that spot to facilitate release. In addition, you can flex and straighten the area that you are working on to help with additional lengthening of the tissue.   Attempt 10-15 passes for each body part to help improve your function and tissue mobility.


ITB band rollingitb
Quad rolling



Hamstring rolling



Back rolling



Adductor rolling with stick



Cheatham S, Kobler M, Cain M, et al. The effect of self-myofascial release using foam roller or roller massager on joint range of motion, muscle recovery, and performance: a systematic review. Int J Sports Phys Ther. 2015 Nov;10(6):827-38

Hello from BBPT’s Day of Service!

Fiona McMahon, DPT


Happy Global PT Day of Service, everyone! October 15th is a day physical therapists take some time to give back to the community. We, at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy, did our service a little early, because many of our PTs are attending the International Pelvic Pain Society meeting, October 13-16, including their Friday night fundraising event. (To contribute to IPPS, non-for-profit: ADD URL)

We arrived at BBPT early on the first Saturday of October, ordered some bagels, brewed some coffee and had a pro-bono clinic. We met a ton of great people who came in for free evaluations and home-exercise programs.

We at Beyond Basics, consider ourselves lucky to be physical therapists and to do the work we love everyday. We are so happy to have amazing patients, family and support. Thank you all for your continued support.

Check out what other physical therapists are doing today near you!

To learn more about the International Pelvic Pain Society:  



Why is pooping so difficult

toiletFiona McMahon, DPT

The number of Americans who deal with constipation issues is massive (4 million!)! It seems like every time I mention that I’m a pelvic floor physical therapist, another friend of a friend pulls me aside with bowel movement concerns. Why is it that so many people have issues? And more importantly – what can we do about it? This is the topic of our next Pelvic Health 101 seminar  on October 20th at 7pm. 

Not only will constipation be discussed but other bowel conditions, such as irritable bowel syndrome, fecal incontinence, bloating and hemorrhoids will be addressed. The lecture will also go in depth on the role of fiber, water intake, toilet posture and pelvic floor muscles in having a successful bowel movement. You will even go home with easy techniques that you can implement immediately to help you get that smooth move! Don’t miss out on this FREE event – it’s a MUST for anyone who struggles on the porcelain throne. Seats are going fast!  Light snacks and refreshments will be served.

Register at  today.


110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY


Check out or upcoming courses!

Pelvic Health 101 Fall- (003)


Ph101 : Pelvic pain, meditation workshop with Ryanne Glasper, DPT & restorative yoga, calming down your pelvic floor

Fiona McMahon, DPT,

Enlightenment in nature

Earlier this summer, we discussed the nature of pain. In Putting Pain Into Context, We discussed how pain is comprised of two distinct components: the physical stimulus and how our brain interprets that stimulus. Both meditation and yoga are helpful techniques to help retrain how your brain responds to pain.

Join us on October 13th at 7pm for an introduction to both restorative yoga and meditation. Learn more about the science and try it out yourself with Anne Taylor, yoga instructor specializing in chronic pain and Ryanne Glasper, Physical Therapist and yoga instructor.  Come find out how these techniques may be helpful for you!


Register at  today.


110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY


Check out our upcoming courses:

Pelvic Health 101 Fall- (003)

Breast Cancer Awareness Month


Fiona McMahon, DPT

Have you noticed an increase in the amount of pink on just about everything the last couple days? The increase of pink everything is because October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month.  Breast Cancer is an extremely common cancer. According to the Nation Breast Cancer Foundation, 1 in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime. Men can also get breast cancer, however it is much more rare for men to develop breast cancer. Luckily with early detection and treatment of early stage and localized cancer, the 5 year relative survival rate is 100%. That being said, early detection is crucial and it is important to catch breast cancer early to ensure the best possible outcome. Let’s take some time to review the signs of breast cancer and recommended screening protocols.

Signs and Symptoms of Breast Cancer

  • Change of Sensation/ texture of the Breast or Nipples
    • Lumps, change in texture in the breast, nipple, or underarm area
  • Change in appearance of Breast or Nipple
    • Swelling
    • Shrinkage
    • Dimpling
    • Change of nipple orientation
  • Discharge from nipple


bfab76550709826284e190dd6efc1a76Self Exam

  • Recommend for women of all ages
  • Should be performed every 12 months
  • Check in the shower: move the pads of your fingers over your breasts in a circular motion. If you find any lumps or skin abnormalities, visit your healthcare provider.
  • Visual exam: examine your breasts in the mirror. if you note any changes in your breasts such as bumps, skin changes, nipple orientation, dimpling, shrinkage, or swelling, visit your healthcare provider
  • Lying down: moving the pads of your fingers, check for breast abnormalities. Squeeze nipples to check for discharge. If you find any lumps or skin abnormalities, visit your healthcare provider.


Recommended Screening:


  • Recommended every 1-2 years for women who are 40 years old or older.
  • May be recommended for women who are under 40, but have increased risk of breast cancer.


Genetic Testing

brca12For some types of breast cancer, there is a very specific link to a person’s genes and her or his risk of developing breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are genes that are responsible for the production of certain tumor suppressing proteins. In some populations there are mutations in these genes that disable their tumor fighting properties. These gene mutations are relatively rare and currently screening is recommended just for individuals with increased risk of harboring these mutations. According to the National Cancer Institute, individuals who are at higher risk and should consider genetic testing are:

  • Individuals who have a male relative who has developed breast cancer
  • History of BRCA related cancers within family history
  • People of Ashkenazi (Eastern European) Jewish ancestry
  • Breast Cancer diagnosed before age 50 in family
  • Multiple cases of breast cancer in family

Individuals that test positive for BRCA mutations may consider increased screening, prophylactic surgery or chemoprevention.

Mastectomy and Physical Therapy

Mastectomy, removal of the breast is currently the most common treatment for breast cancer. Some women chose to have their breasts reconstructed after their mastectomy and others do not. It is obviously a very personal choice.  Like any surgery, mastectomies require close postoperative care to ensure maximal function and recovery.

You may have read the last sentence, and thought, “What is the function of the breast, besides breast feeding and for sexual pleasure?” The breast lies in an important intersection in the body. The armpit (axilla) contains bundles of nerves, blood vessels, and lymph vessels that course through it, serving the arm down to the fingers. After mastectomy, their course can be interrupted by scar tissue, radiation damage (if your treatment included radiation), causing painful conditions such as nerve entrapments, frozen shoulder, and lymphedema, ( a backup of lymph fluid, if left unchecked can cause permanent damage and deformation of the arm).

victoria2016Victoria LaManna, DPT, CLT, is our lymphedema expert. If you have had a mastectomy and are unsure about lymphedema care, she is an excellent resource. She will be able to instruct you in self- care and lymphedema prevention measures. Physical therapy can also help to release scar tissue in the breast and upper arm area, regain strength in the arm, and ultimately improve your function. Visit us, and read up on Victoria’s bio here, as well ask on our website at:


Breast cancer is extremely common, but luckily outcomes continue to improve, but early detection is key.  This October, let’s stand together to commit to regular self exams and educate the women in our lives to screen themselves as well. Let’s reduce the impact of breast cancer, one step at a time.

Sources: Accessed: September 24, 2016

National Cancer Institute. BRCA1 and BRCA2: Cancer Risk and Genetic Testing. Accessed September 25,2016