Myofascial Release for Pelvic Floor Pain

What is Myofascial Release, and what does it do for Pelvic Floor Pain?

By Mary Hughes

Myofascial Release (MFR) is a holistic, therapeutic approach to manual therapy, popularized by John Barnes, PT, LMT, NCTMB. MFR offers a comprehensive approach for the evaluation and treatment of the myofascial system, the system of tissues and muscles in the body.

This technique is designed to release restrictions such a trigger points, muscle tightness, and dysfunctions in soft tissue that may cause pain and limit motion in all parts of the body. It has shown success in decreasing pain and increasing mobility.1

J. Barnes’ MFR techniques have been used to treat the following:

  • Pelvic Floor Pain & Dysfunction
  • Vulvodynia
  • Mastectomy Pain
  • Endometriosis
  • Interstitial Cystitis
  • Lymphedema
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Painful Scars
  • Menstrual Problems
  • Painful Intercourse
  • Adhesions
  • Coccygeal Pain
  • Problematic Breast Implant/Reduction Scars
  • Urinary Incontinence, Urgency and/or Frequency
  • Episiotomy Scars
  • Infertility Problems

In a study by fitzgerald et. Al. they found the response rate from Myofascial physical therapy was significantly higher than Global therapeutic massage among patients diagnoses with urological chronic pelvic pain syndromes.

References
1. Dutton, Mark. Orthopaedic examination, evaluation, & intervention. New York : McGraw-Hill, c2004 pages 331-332, 1218

2. John Barnes’ Courses completed MFR I, MFR 2, Myofascial Unwinding, Myofascial Soft Tissue Mobilization workshop, The Fascial Pelvis and The Women’s Health Seminar.

3. FitzGerald MP, Anderson RU, Potts J, et al. Randomized multicenter feasibility trial of myofascial physical therapy for the treatment of urological chronic pelvic pain syndromes. J Urol 2009; 182:570.

 

 

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