BBPT Health Tip: Safe Lifting

Fiona McMahon DPTatlas-edit1

Chances are you have done some travelling over the past month. The holidays are a time when we haul luggage through airports, Christmas trees and boxes of decorations through your house, or load massive turkeys into the oven. With all this lifting on the docket, I have a pretty good hunch you don’t want to start the new year with a heating pad and lying down in bed, so I am going to share with you, some of my favorite lifting tips.

Get close to what you are lifting:2d545236f6174a3b7564d186a596aed2

I mean really close. Maybe hug it if you can. The reason why we should get close to what we are lifting calls back to highschool physics. The force on the spine equals the weight of the object being lifted by the distance it is away from the spine. Therefore, the farther an object is away from you, the harder it is on the spine to lift. My co-workers use the term “T-Rex arms” to describe how close they want their patients to be holding what they are lifting.

  1. Squat

Don’t lift with your back. You have

all heard it a million times, but if you bend forward with your back to pick up what you are lifting, you will end up placing a tremendous strain on the muscles and bones of your spine. Just don’t do it. Instead, bend with your knees to get to what you want to lift, and push through your legs to stand back up.

  1. Don’t be a Hero

Ask for help if something seems too heavy to lift. In the long run, everyone will be better off. Knowing when to ask for help is sometimes the most challenging part of safe lifting practices.  If you feel you are asking for more help than you would like or you have back pain that is not resolving, come see us at Beyond Basics to help you get back into lifting shape.  The sooner, the better.  You don’t want it to become a chronic problem.  

BBPT Health Tip: Sleep Better

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Fiona McMahon DPT

Anyone who has had or knows someone with a newborn knows how much sleep or lack thereof, can affect your health, comfort, and emotional well being. Here at BBPT, we see first hand how nights or even just a night of poor sleep can affect our patients’ symptoms from aches and pains, to constipation, to any chronic or acute pain condition and many more. Disrupted sleep is often the first thing we try to tackle in physical therapy because it is so integral to our patients’ health and recovery. Let’s explore some easy tips here:

Cut the screen time: There’s multiple reasons to do this. Incoming messages and news can jar us out of the relaxation we need to fall asleep. It has also been shown that the light emitted from our electronic devices can affect our sleep hormones making it harder to go to sleep.

Keep your bedroom dark: Lights emitted from chargers, light from outside can keep you awake.

Limit caffeine and alcohol intake: Both affect your ability to fall asleep and stay asleep

Keep your room cool: Your body cools as you sleep. A room that is too hot may prevent this. Keep your room around 65 degrees

Manage your aches and pains: Pain keeps you up at night. If an orthopedic condition like a shoulder injury is keeping you up at night, visit a physical therapist who can not only treat your injury, but allow you to find a comfortable sleeping position while you heal.

Manage your anxiety: So many of us suffer with anxiety and there are many ways to deal with it. From meditation, to deep breathing (include hyperlink), to restorative yogaand meditation, to mental health therapy, there is something that can help. Take the time to find what works for you.

Sources

https://sleepfoundation.org/bedroom/see.php. Accessed: November 30, 2016

World Aids Day

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Today, December 1st 2016, is World AIDS Day. World Aids Day has been held on the first of every December since 1988. World AIDS Day works to spread awareness of the disease and to remind the general public that AIDS and HIV still must be taken seriously and that there is still a lot of work to do in order to prevent the transmission of new cases, as well as to better care for those who are infected with the disease.

What is AIDS/HIV?

AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome), is caused by a virus called human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). HIV can be treated in order to prevent AIDS, however there is currently no cure for HIV.

HIV causes AIDS by attacking the immune cells of a person’s body, which can leave a person vulnerable to infections that otherwise would not have made them sick. These infections are referred to as opportunistic infections, an opportunistic infection is a signal that someone’s HIV may have progressed into AIDS.

As said earlier, HIV doesn’t always have to progress to AIDS. Antiretroviral therapy (ART)  can work to help keep the immune system healthy, as well as lower the risk of transmitting the virus to others. People on ART have dramatically improved lifespans. It is imperative to get on ART as soon as possible to lessen the effects the HIV virus has on your immune system.

HIV Testing

1 in 7 people infected with HIV do not know they have the virus. Testing is necessary to start treatment and reduce harm done to your immune system as well as risk of transmission to others.

According to AIDS.gov, you should be tested if:

  • You have had sex with someone who is HIV positive, or someone whose status you were unsure of since your last test
  • Had tuberculosis or hepatitis
  • Used shared needles
  • Been diagnosed with another type of sexually transmitted disease

HIV/ AIDS and Physical Therapy

Physical Therapists do not treat AIDS or HIV, rather, they treat the symptoms of AIDS/HIV and HIV/AIDS treatment to allow patients to live as fully and independently as possible. Both the disease itself and the treatment for it have effects like increasing fatigue, decreasing strength and endurance, and increased pain. Physical therapy can help by tailoring programs to help with pain, ability to perform everyday tasks, improve heart health, balance, endurance, strength and flexibility.

You can mark today by doing a number of things:

Wear a red ribbon to spread awareness

Donate to groups that work to help people living with AIDS and help to prevent its transmission:

United Nations (UN AIDS)

https://donations.unaids.org/

UNICEF

https://www.unicefusa.org/donate/support-unicefs-hivaids-programs

Sources:

AIDS.gov

Resources:

HIV/Screening:

National HIV Testing database: https://gettested.cdc.gov/