March 6th is Lymphedema Awareness Day!

lymphedema

Victoria LaManna PT, DPT, CLT

March 6th is Lymphedema Awareness Day! The lymph system carries the body’s waste products, dead pathogens, and water. Eventually these substances are cleared by the body. Problems can occur if the lymph system gets blocked and cannot clear these substances. Problems with the lymphatic system can cause swelling in affected limbs, and sometimes pain, as well as fibrotic changes in the skin.

You can be born with issues in your lymph system which can cause primary lymphedema or you can have damage to your lymph system because of surgery or radiation treatments, especially for breast cancer.

If you are living with lymphedema, try these tips from the Mayo Clinic to keep your limbs as healthy as possible:

  • Avoid injections, vaccinations, blood pressure monitoring, or IV’s on the affected limb
  • Don’t wear tight fitting clothing or jewelry
  • Avoid exposure to extreme temperatures, like hot baths, or saunas
  • Monitor your affected limb for signs of infection, and go to the doctor if you suspect infection

 

You can also check out our list of Self Care Tips 

Physical therapy can help manage lymphedema, which requires a very specialized lymphedema certified therapist.  At Beyond Basics Physical Therapy, we are lucky to offer lymphedema treatment with our own Certified Lymphedema Therapist, Victoria LaManna, PT, DPT, CLT . If you are interested in starting your lymphedema treatment journey, call and make an appointment with Victoria today!

For more reading on lymphedema, check out our previous blogs:

Lymph Drainage  Therapy for Breast Health at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy

Beyond Basics’, Victoria LaManna Receives Lymphatic Drainage Therapy Certification

 

Sources
Ness S. Living with lymphedema: Take precautions, get support. 2011. Mayo Clinic. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/cancer/expert-blog/lymphedema-management/bgp-20056387. Accessed February 10, 2017

Spring Pelvic Health 101 is Coming

Fiona McMahon, DPT, PT

Pelvic Health 101 is back with some old favorites like, “Something’s wrong with my what?” and “Why is pooping so difficult?” We have also added a new course on pediatric pelvic floor issues.

If you have questions, we have answers. Join us for lectures and question and answer opportunities with expert pelvic health physical therapists, childbirth educators, and nutritionists. Please reserve your spot early at pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com. Remember spots fill up quickly. As always, light refreshments will be served.

pelvic-health-101-spring-2017

The use of Breath in the Pilates Method

Denise Small PT, DPT

The following series of Pilates blog posts will focus on the principles that define the Pilates method.  Joseph Pilates developed his methodology using eight basic movement principles: whole body movement, breathing, balanced muscle development, concentration, control, centering, precision, and rhythm.  Today’s blog will focus on the principle of Breathing.

pilatesBreathing is a natural phenomenon that is performed thousands of times a day. Our daily intake of oxygen and expulsion of carbon dioxide is needed to cleanse our blood, and maintain the functioning of our body systems.  That being said, there are different ways to manipulate one’s breath to help facilitate certain physiological functions. For example, there have been many BBPT blog posts about diaphragmatic breathing, where one breathes into their abdomen to get a stretch of both the diaphragm and the pelvic floor muscles. Well, Pilates had his own approach to breathing, which was a variation on Diaphragmatic breathing.  Pilates approach to breathing was aimed at getting maximal air intake and release to give the body, what he called, “an internal shower” to rid the body of “toxins”. Pilates focused specifically on lateral expansion of the diaphragm, whereas traditional diaphragmatic breathing focuses on the vertical expansion of the diaphragm. In order to achieve this, Pilates encouraged maintaining the engaged tone of the abdomen, while breathing into the front, sides, and back of the ribcage. See the image below for further explanation.

 

Pilates- Ribcage/ Chest breathing versus Belly/Diaphragmatic breathing

This is an overly simplified view of the actual mechanics. However, both versions are very important. With the ability to differentiate between ribcage and diaphragmatic breathing you can offer your diaphragm a 3-dimensional stretch and the ability to work on abdominal contraction as well as endurance. If you have any questions you can ask them in the comments section. Or come visit me at Beyond Basics for a Pilates Private session!