Yeast the Inflammation Beast

 

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Fiona McMahon DPT, PT

You are what you eat. Trash in equals trash out. You can’t exercise yourself away from an unhealthy diet. These adages are often on my mind as I make my food choices because of the myriad health professionals who have taken time to come to our practice to tell us how we can improve our own and our patients’ health by taking more time to look at what we are consuming in our diet. Lately, many of these clinicians have been focusing on candida overgrowth and diet, which can contribute to pain and inflammation conditions.

What we eat can directly affect the bacterial and fungal makeup of the gut, AKA the gut microbiome. The gut requires a certain level of good bacteria to help us digest what we eat. Over time a poor gut microbiome can affect how efficiently the gut works. The function of the gut goes beyond just digesting food but also is vitally important for the production of neurotransmitters, which help to spread messages within the brain and throughout the whole body.  The microbiome also plays an important role in our hormones and immune system. When the microbiome of the gut is not balanced, it is called dysbiosis.

One of the most common culprits in gut microbiota dysbiosis is candida, (Yeast!). Candida is a naturally occurring inhabitant of the body and when it’s at appropriate levels, it doesn’t tend to be noticed, but anyone who has experienced a yeast infection knows that if this little guy is allowed to go unchecked, it can do a lot to make you miserable. Besides plaguing women with itching, burning vulvas, a yeast overgrowth may cause many other ailments.

Science has pointed to the role candida can play in contributing to chronic and inflammatory conditions. In one study by Kumamoto in 2011, candida overgrowth was associated with delayed healing of inflammatory lesions and was associated with pro-inflammatory cytokines (chemicals) and increased incidence of inflammatory bowel disease like ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease.

Yeast overgrowth can also affect the bladder along with over colonization of Saccharomyces (another form of fungus). In fact, yeast and Saccharomyces were found to be higher in women during a flare of interstitial cystitis than when their symptoms were low.

Yeast is not the only organism that can get out of balance and affect our bodies in harmful ways. There are many other players that can get out of balance. Some signs of an altered gut microbiome is a history of allergies, eczema, or repeated fungal infection.

 

What to do?

It all seems pretty dire, right. How do you control who is colonizing your gut, when you barely have enough time to make it to the gym after work? There are a few simple steps you can start with.

Avoid antibiotics, unless your doctor thinks you need them.

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The medical community has become a lot more aware of the dangers of over-prescribing antibiotics from their perspective, but it is important to keep in mind that a powerful antibiotic can wipe out good bacteria and bad bacteria in one fell swoop. If the good guys in your gut are reduced, the bad bacteria have a better chance of taking over. Take antibiotics only when recommended. Keep in mind antibiotics will not help treat viruses like the flu, they can only treat bacterial infections.

Modify your diet

close-up-cooking-cuisine-629093.jpgIncrease your consumption of good fats (omega 3’s) to help reduce inflammation.

Food high in omega 3’s includes flax and hemp seed/oils, fish (the fishier the fish, usually means more omega 3’s, for example, herring is higher in omega 3 than a milder fish like snapper). Also, reduce your consumption of processed foods which can increase inflammation levels and eliminate simple sugars and fried foods. If this is only minimally successful, try a gluten and dairy free diet.  

If simple changes are not helping consider seeing a professional

Find a naturopath, functional or integrated MD, or nutritionist who can investigate more fully whether or not you have SIBO (Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth), candida overgrowth, or other gut microbiome disorder. Or perhaps you are lacking certain ingredients, vitamins or mineral.  These professionals can tailor a diet and medication regimen to help return your gut microbiome to tip-top shape.

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Fiona McMahon is currently seeing patients at our Midtown Location

 

If you have questions about orthopedic, pelvic, or sports physical therapy, BBPT is offering free phone consults to those living in the greater NYC area for a limited amount of time!

Beyond Basics Physical Therapy

212-354-2622 (42nd Street Location)

212-267-0240 (William Street Location)

 

 

Sources:

Kamamoto C. Inflammation and gastrointestinal candida colonization. Cur Opin Microbiol. 2011;14(40): 386-391

Bringing Things into Balance: The Relationship Between Low Back Pain and the Pelvic Floor

By: Katie Parrotte, PT, DPT, OCS, CFMT

Back Pain or Fitness (2)The Occurrence of Low Back Pain

Low back pain is the most common cause of disability and lost work time among working-age adults in industrialized countries (1). In fact, the worldwide prevalence of chronic low back pain has been estimated to be 11.9% of the population on a given day, and 23.2% of the population in a one-month period (2). That is a significant number of people! Determining effective treatments for low back pain can be challenging for various reasons: 1. there are no clearly defined risk factors that predict the development or outcome of low back pain; 2. most patients do not present with any significant findings physiologically or anatomically; 3. and pain can generate and spread at numerous locations within the nervous system, and can constantly change (1).

Treatment of Low Back Pain

There are many challenges associated with low back pain diagnosis and outcomes. Because of this, and the fact that so many people across the globe are impacted by it, there are many options out there for treating this condition. Some methods that have been proven to be effective are spinal manipulation (a high-velocity thrust applied directly on the vertebrae, or backbones, to improve movement and decrease pain), trunk coordination, strengthening, and endurance exercises (to target deep abdominal and back muscles that help to stabilize the spine), general fitness exercise, and patient education (1). These types of interventions are certainly helpful and have allowed many individuals experiencing low back pain to return to their daily lives. However, perhaps the areas that are being addressed with these interventions are not getting to the whole story… There is another area of the body that plays a significant role in the stability of the back but does not regularly get addressed with standard treatment to low back pain: the pelvic floor.

Treating the Pelvic Floor to Address Low Back Pain

Several studies have looked at incorporating pelvic floor-specific strengthening programs in the treatment of chronic low back pain. One study looked at women who were experiencing low back pain and urinary incontinence (the involuntary leakage of urine) (3), while two others looked at individuals experiencing chronic low back pain independently in men and women (4, 5). In all three studies, investigators compared “routine” physical therapy to routine physical therapy plus the addition of pelvic floor strengthening. Results revealed that incorporating pelvic floor strengthening decreased low back pain, decreased the incidence of urine leakage in the case of urinary incontinence, improved function based on specific questionnaires, and increased pelvic floor strength and endurance (3-5). This strengthening was completed by either performing isolated pelvic floor contractions (4, 5), or performing abdominal and pelvic floor muscle contractions while performing specific stabilizing exercises (3).

The Relationship Between the Pelvic Floor and the Low Back

Why did strengthening the pelvic floor make a difference in the above studies? This is likely because the pelvic floor is one of the muscle groups that contributes to overall spine stability; the others include the diaphragm, the transverse abdominis (a lower abdominal muscle), and deep muscles in the low back (3). Several studies out of Norway and Sweden have revealed that in women without pain, the pelvic floor activates just prior to arm or leg movement (6-8). This is important because it reveals that when the pelvic floor is working efficiently, it provides stability to the trunk and pelvis, allowing for functional postures and movements to occur.

Conclusion:

The pelvic floor is an important stabilizer of the spine and pelvis, and activates just prior to movement to allow for efficient function. When an individual is experiencing low back pain, not only do the abdominals and low back muscles require strengthening, focusing on the pelvic floor can help to eliminate pain and resume daily function.

If you or someone you know is struggling with unresolved low back pain, make an appointment with a pelvic floor physical therapist today for further assessment. Feel free to contact our midtown office at 212-354-2622 or our downtown office at 212-267-0240, or visit our website (www.beyondbasicsphysicaltherapy.com) for more information!

Thank you so much for reading our blog.

K5 (2)

Katie Parrotte, PT, DPT, OCS, CFMT practices at our midtown location.

If you have questions about orthopedic, pelvic, or sports physical therapy, including back pain, BBPT is offering free phone consults to those living in the greater NYC area for a limited amount of time!

Beyond Basics Physical Therapy

212-354-2622 (42nd Street Location)

212-267-0240 (William Street Location)

Sources

 

1. Beattie PF. 2016. Current concepts of orthopedic physical therapy – the lumbar spine: physical therapy patient management using current evidence, 4th edition. (p. 3) Orthopedic Section – APTA.

2. Hoy D, Bain C, Williams G, et al. A systematic review of the global prevalence of low back pain. Arthritis Rheum. 2012; 64 (6): 2028-2037. doi:10.1002/art.34347.

3. Ghaderi F, Mohammadi K, Sasan RA, et al. Effects of stabilization exercises focusing on pelvic floor muscles on low back pain and on urinary incontinence in women. Urology. 2016; 93: 50-54.

4. Mohseni-Bandpei MA, Rahmani N, Behtash H, et al. The effect of pelvic floor muscle exercise on women with chronic non-specific low back pain. Journal of Bodywork & Movement Therapies. 2011; 15: 75-81.

5. Bi X, Zhao J, Liu Z, et al Pelvic floor muscle exercise for chronic low back pain. Journal of International Medical Research. 2012; 41 (1): 146-152.

6. Sjodahl J, Gutke A, Ghaffari G, et al. Response of the muscles in the pelvic floor and the lower lateral abdominal wall during the active straight leg raise in women with and without pelvic girdle pain: an experimental study. Clinical Biomechanics. 2016; 35: 49-55.

7. Stuge B, Saetre K, Hoff BI. The automatic pelvic floor muscle response to the active straight leg raise in cases with pelvic girdle pain and matched controls. Manual Therapy. 2013; 18: 327-332.

8. Sjodahl J, Kvist J, Gutke A, et al. The postural response of the pelvic floor muscles during limb movements: a methodological electromyography study in parous women without lumbopelvic pain. Clinical Biomechanics. 2009; 24: 183-189.

Be a Bladder Whiz! Healthy Bladder Tips for All!

Fiona McMahon PT, DPT and Amy Stein PT, DPT

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So we busted some myths in our last Pelvic Floor Myth Buster Blog, where we discussed whether or not holding your pee causes urinary tract infections. If you haven’t gotten a chance, check it out here. People living with bladder conditions, like pain, hesitancy, frequency, post void dribbling, and incontinence know that an unruly bladder can be really disruptive. In this blog, we are going to take some time to discuss some practical tips and tips you can employ right now to tame an unruly bladder. Many of these tips come from Amy’s book, Heal Pelvic Pain, available here.

So what are we working with?

Male or female, we all have the same basic structure of the bladder, with a few exceptions. Here’s what everyone has in their lower urinary tract.

Detrusor Muscle: Forms the body of the bladder and is responsible for squeezing the bladder to empty its contents. It spends most of its time relaxed in order to allow for bladder filling.
Trigone Muscle: Forms the neck of the bladder, and is a powerful sensory organ. When the trigone stretches in response to the filling of the bladder, it sends a message to the brain that it’s time to pee.
Internal Urethral Sphincter: Smooth muscle (involuntary) which seals off the exit of the bladder and allows for continence.
External Urethral Sphincter: Striated or voluntary muscles which also seals the exit of the bladder.
Urethra: This is the tube that leads out of the bladder and is the pathway for urine into the outside world.

Sex differences:
Many men have a prostate. The prostate is a sex organ and is responsible for keeping the semen at the right pH to fertilize a waiting egg. It wraps around the urethra and lives just under the bladder. It also provides a mechanical buttress or support for the bladder, lessening the load on the pelvic floor. Because of its proximity to the urethra, problems with the prostate can cause problems with the bladder. An enlarged prostate, which can be a part of aging, cancer, or infection, will restrict the flow of urine out of the urethra, resulting in a weak stream, painful, burning urination, and difficulty urinating (however, the same thing happens with tight pelvic floor muscles with or without prostate involvement, which makes bladder issues super confusing).

Another important difference between guys and gals are the respective length of their urethras. Male urethras are a lot longer than female urethras. This is one of the reasons women are more prone to bladder infections. In a female, bacteria have a lot easier time making the trek to the bladder because of the shorter urethra.

So how do I help my bladder?

Posture

If you are having problems fully emptying your bladder or you have post void leakage (dribbling following going to the bathroom) consider your toileting posture. People with bladder issues should sit on the toilet (even dudes), to allow the pelvic floor muscles to relax and allow the bladder to fully empty.

Stretch!

Here’s a great stretch from Amy Stein’s book, Heal Pelvic Pain available here in hard copy and digital download.

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Here’s how to do the stretch

1. Lie on a firm surface-on a mat on the floor or on a hard mattress. Bring your knees up to your chest and then let them relax and rotate out to the side so that they flare outward. Use your hands to hold your knees in this position.

2. Stretch as you deep-breathe for six to eight breaths. Do not bounce, and do not push hard. Just gradually and progressively fill and empty your lungs.

3. Hold the stretch for 30 to 60 seconds. Do three repetitions, two to four times a day. 

Bladder Training

If you have bladder frequency or leakage with urge now is the time to try and train your bladder to hold more urine. Keep in mind you should start treatment to address pain with physical therapy and in certain cases, with medication, to allow you to be successful with bladder training. I always tell my patients to start their bladder retraining at home, where a bathroom is available to take the stress out of possible leaks or not being able to find a bathroom. Start by simply waiting to go to the bathroom 5-10 minutes past your first urge to urinate. Use behavioral strategies, such as deep breathing and pelvic floor drops, mindfulness, gentle stretches, distraction, and others. If you don’t have to go after 5-10 minutes, Great! If you do, go to the bathroom. As waiting 10 minutes becomes easy, stretch your time to 20 minutes and so on until you are able to go 2-3 hours in between urination.

 

Diet

This can make such a huge difference. My boss and Beyond Basic’s founder, Amy Stein, writes in her book Heal Pelvic Pain, that we should really try to get eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day, and try to finish them at least two hours before bed, to reduce your chance of needing to go at night. We call this symptom, nocturia.

As far as things we chew on, many foods can irritate the bladder, but not all foods bother everyone in the same way. It’s all about experimenting to find your triggers. Some common foods include food high in sugar, spices, acid (like tomatoes and citrus), tannins (like in wine). John’s Hopkins has a really good list, which you can access here. This list is totally overwhelming at first blush, but remember my bladder irritant may not be yours. Typically you will know shortly after eating the offender, on the same day. So the best thing to do is to try the suspected bladder irritants one at a time to see if you can identify a triggering food or drink.

Manage Constipation

The bladder does not have a lot of space, where it lives. In front of it lies the pubic bone, behind it lies a vagina for some of us, the rectum, and then the sacrum bone. The bones sandwich the bladder like bookends. Although these bones have some movement, which we treat, it’s not enough to allow for much more space for the bladder if your rectum is full of poo from being constipated. With an overfilled rectum, the bladder gets squashed against the pubic bone. With a squashed bladder, you may not empty it as well, feel urgency, or even experience bladder leakage. Therefore, avoid constipation at all costs! We advise our patients to drink more water and eat more soluble and insoluble fibers.

 

Physical Therapy Can Help Cure!

Physical therapy is considered a mainstay and the number one treatment for musculoskeletal causes of bladder disorders and bladder and urethral pain. Expert pelvic floor physical therapists (PFPTs) are clinicians who can find the cause of your bladder issues and provide you with a customized plan that will provide you with the best results possible. PFPTs can work to relax spasmed muscles, treat constipation contributing to bladder issues, improve your toilet posture, reduce tightness and shortening of tissues around the bladder, abdominal and thigh region that can contribute to bladder dysfunction, as well as strengthen weak muscles. If you are experiencing bladder issues, please come to see us. There is so much we can do to help!

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If you have questions about orthopedic, pelvic, or sports physical therapy, BBPT is offering free phone consults to those living in the greater NYC area for a limited amount of time!

Beyond Basics Physical Therapy

212-354-2622 (42nd Street Location)

212-267-0240 (William Street Location)

Pilates Move of The Month with Kierstin! Lat Pull and Triceps

Kierstin Elliot

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Goal: To IMPROVE Posture!

Exercise: Lat Pulls and Triceps

Set up: Lie facedown on the box with naval pulled up towards the spine, chin tucked in with neck lengthened (as if you are holding a tangerine under your chin), glutes engaged, and legs extended. Pull yourself to back bars of the reformer and hold onto the poles with both hands. Use one blue spring for resistance.

Execution: Inhale to lengthen elbows, exhale to bend elbows.

Focus: The main muscle group targeted here are the lats. Think about pulling down from the armpits while the elbows bend and extend. This action will help stabilize the shoulders, keeping them out of the ears. Also, focus on releasing the upper traps and lengthening the back of the neck. The more work we can get from underneath the shoulder blades, rather than above, the better!

Importance: Improves posture! Strong back extensors lead to better posture, especially in this day in age where phones and computers are constantly pulling our shoulders forward and weakening our backs. Incorporate a few lat pulls into your routine and feel taller almost instantly!

Modifications: To make it easier, drop tension to one yellow spring. To make it harder, place a squishy ball between ankles and add hamstring curls or pulses between lat pull sets!

Here I am, demonstrating the lat pull!

World AIDS Day

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Today, December 1st, 2018, is World AIDS Day. World Aids Day has been held on the first of every December since 1988. World AIDS Day works to spread awareness of the disease and to remind the general public that AIDS and HIV still must be taken seriously and that there is still a lot of work to do in order to prevent the transmission of new cases, as well as to better care for those who are infected with the disease.

What is AIDS/HIV?

AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome), is caused by a virus called human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). HIV can be treated in order to prevent AIDS, however, there is currently no cure for HIV.

HIV causes AIDS by attacking the immune cells of a person’s body, which can leave a person vulnerable to infections that otherwise would not have made them sick. These infections are referred to as opportunistic infections, an opportunistic infection is a signal that someone’s HIV may have progressed into AIDS.

As we said earlier, HIV doesn’t always have to progress to AIDS. Antiretroviral therapy (ART)  can work to help keep the immune system healthy, as well as lower the risk of transmitting the virus to others. People on ART have dramatically improved lifespans. It is imperative to get on ART as soon as possible to lessen the effects the HIV virus has on your immune system.

HIV Testing

1 in 7 people infected with HIV does not know they have the virus. Testing is necessary to start treatment and reduce the harm done to your immune system as well as the risk of transmission to others.

According to HIV.gov, you should be tested if:

  • “you a man who has had sex with another man
  •  you had sex—anal or vaginal—with an HIV-positive partner
  •  you had more than one sex partner
  • you injected drugs and shared needles or works (for example, water or cotton) with others
  •  you exchanged sex for drugs or money
  •  you been diagnosed with, or sought treatment for, another sexually transmitted disease
  •  you been diagnosed with or treated for hepatitis or tuberculosis (TB)
  • you had sex with someone who could answer “yes” to any of the above questions or someone whose sexual history you don’t know?

Taken directly from HIV.gov, click here to learn more

 

HIV/ AIDS and Physical Therapy

Physical Therapists do not treat AIDS or HIV, rather, they can treat some the symptoms of AIDS/HIV and HIV/AIDS treatment, to allow patients to live as fully and independently as possible. Both the disease itself and the treatment for it have effects like increasing fatigue, decreasing strength and endurance, and increased pain. Physical therapy can help by tailoring programs to help with pain, ability to perform everyday tasks, improve heart health, balance, endurance, strength, and flexibility.

You can mark today by doing a number of things:

Wear a red ribbon to spread awareness

Donate to groups that work to help people living with AIDS and help to prevent its transmission:

United Nations (UN AIDS)

https://donations.unaids.org/

UNICEF

https://www.unicefusa.org/donate/support-unicefs-hivaids-programs

 

Resources:

HIV/Screening:

National HIV Testing database: https://gettested.cdc.gov/