How to Deal with Pelvic Floor Pain From Home

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Dear reader, 

As I sit down to write this, New York City is on PAUSE, many other cities around the world are on various forms of lock-down. As a planet, we are working to slow the spread of COVID-19, the condition caused by the novel coronavirus. Those of you who are working from and staying at home, your efforts are noble and life saving. We thank you. For those of you in pain, we see you and feel for how tough it can be to feel like you have to wait to get help. Hopefully in a short period of time this virus will have passed . Follow these simple tricks to get started on tackling your pelvic pain. 

 

Check In With Your Seat

Work from home setups can leave a lot to be desired. Designed for portability, but not ergonomics, our laptop computers can leave us curled up like little cashews or “c’s”. This position tucks our pelvis underneath us and can cause us to put extra pressure and compression through our pelvic floors, not to mention putting extra pressure on our spinal discs. Even if you only have a laptop, you can remedy this c position by imagining you are a puppy dog with a tail. You want to sit so you could wag your tail like a happy puppy. Now for some people this may actually feel a little worse, if it does, this is not the trick for you. Don’t worry I have more. 

If you can, use a portable mouse and keyboard to discourage your cashew sitting tendencies. Arrange your setup so your eye line falls just about in the middle of the monitor by elevating it on some books.  You should be able to access your keyboard with your elbows bent at 90 degrees.

Now it’s time to think about what you are sitting on. I recognize that those of us living in teeny tiny NYC apartments may not have a lot of options to think about. But keep in mind that pelvic floor pain can be counterintuitive and an overstuffed couch, may not be the best thing if your pelvic floor is overworking to stabilize your body while you are sitting. Likewise, your kitchen chair may be too firm. Play around, how does the couch cushion feel on the chair? Is a firmer seat better or worse? You may have to trial and error your way into a solution.

Move

This one is so important. Depending on where you are geographically, you may be allowed different degrees of movement. If you are currently allowed to leave your home for exercise, go for a walk. Besides breaking up the day, walking can decrease the pressure from all the sitting you have been doing, as well as increase blood flow to the pelvic floor. While the requirements for social distancing remain, ensure that you maintain a distance of 6 feet (about 2 meters) between yourself and other people and wear a homemade mask.

If you cannot walk outside, and even if you can, get up periodically throughout the day. Stretch out, do some gentle air squats if they feel good. Look for some free restorative virtual yoga classes. Movement is medicine. 

Just be Happy… Like a Happy Baby

I love this pose so much that I could write a love song to it. Honestly. It works to stretch not only your pelvic floor, but your entire posterior chain  (back of the body). 

The most traditional way to do it, is to lie on your back, bend at your hips and knees, so that your feet are in the air, and grab the outside of your feet. As you stretch bring your knees towards your armpits. Hold this pose for 10 deep, beautiful breaths.

Feel free to modify this pose. Grab on the back of your calves or behind your knees if you have tight hammies. Put a pillow between your abdomen and thighs to prevent any pinching in your hip. It’s honestly all good.

Breathe

Another super important tool in your toolbox. Deep slow breathing can calm your nervous system, which can help to decrease pelvic floor spasm and guarding. In fact, in a study by Van der Velde, it was found that stressful stimuli do cause an increase in pelvic floor tightening. Try 10 deep slow breaths throughout the day and note how you feel from both a pain and stress perspective.

We are OPEN and also offering Telehealth

For those of you who are ready to get started NOW. You can. We are currently offering office evaluations and treatments, and telehealth services. Both Corey Hazama PT, DPT and Amy Stein PT, DPT are doing in person visits and telehealth visits are available with Sarah Paplanus PT, DPT.  For more information contact Beyond Basics Physical Therapy at 212- 354-2622 or check out our website: http://www.beyondbasicspt.com

 

Van der Velde J, Laan E, Everaerd W. Vaginismus, a component of a general defensive reaction. An investigation of pelvic floor muscle activity during exposure to emotion- inducing film excerpts in women with and without vaginismus. Int Urogynecol J Pelvic Floor Dysfunct. 2001; 12 (5) 328-31

 

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