PH101: Ladies Only Session

By: Fiona McMahon, DPT
Hey Ladies!!! In our next installment of our Pelvic Health 101 course, we are hosting a women’s only session to allow for a safe and non-threatening place to discuss many issues that can affect the health of your pelvic floor. This class one of Stephanie Stamas’s (the founder of PH101’s ) favorites and is definitely not to be missed. Hear more about it in her video below! Join us at 7pm on October 25, 2017  Please register at pelvichealth101.eventbrite.com

Location

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY

10017

Pelvic Health 101 Spring 2018 (2)

PH101: Pain and Sexuality: is it all in my head?

 

By Fiona McMahon, DPT

Sex should feel good… really, really good. But when it doesn’t, you may start to wonder, what’s wrong with me? Am I broken? Am I a prude? Am I frigid? Painful sex isn’t something we talk about. No one would look at you twice if you walked into work complaining of pain in your elbow, but if you walk into work complaining about pain in you vagina or penis, you may end up having a meeting with HR.

On April 4th,  we at Beyond Basics are breaking down those taboos and having an educational seminar, followed by an optional question and answer session at the end. We will discuss the many causes of sexual pain and how physical therapy can help.  The event will be hosted by one of our therapists, Stephanie Stamas, Stephanie will give a detailed seminar about pelvic health and take time to clear up some common misconceptions many people have concerning their bodies and sexual function.

Please join us at our office at:

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY 10017
Register at: pelvichealth101.eventbrite.com

Here is our line up of this and future classes

 

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PH101: Does my Diet Really Matter?

Fiona McMahon, DPT

Gluten free, soy free, low FODMAP… It’s amazing how many diets there are out there that really can  provide people with symptom relief. If you are suffering with chronic pain you may be confused on where to start, or what is right for you. You also may have tried out a bunch of different ways of eating, not seen results, and have gotten really frustrated. If this is the case for you, I highly encourage you to come to our next pelvic health seminar on March 28th at 7pm “Does my diet really matter”.

jessica-drummond-headshot-197x300This seminar will be hosted by a special guest speaker, nutritionist Jessica Drummond, MPT,CCN,CHC. Jessica Drummond is a former pelvic floor physical therapist who now specializes in nutrition for those suffering with pelvic floor dysfunction. This seminar has been a huge hit and is a great starting point for those considering adding nutrition as part of their healing journey.

Register at pelvichealth101.eventbrite.com today.

 

 

Location

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY

10017

Pelvic Health 101 Spring 2018 (2)

 

Take Charge of Your Health! How to Advocate for Yourself.

StethoscopeKaitlyn Parrotte, PT, DPT

Board-Certified Clinical Specialist in Orthopaedic Physical Therapy (OCS)

Certified Functional Manual Therapist (CFMT)

The new year is in full swing, and many of us have set goals to help start things off with renewed energy. One area in which, many people make goals in is health. While some folks vow to go to the gym regularly, or eat healthily, many other individuals commit to having medical check-ups, or taking care of a long-festering issue, such as a painful knee or abdominal pain. No matter what type of healthcare provider you are visiting, it is imperative that you come prepared to make sure you are getting all the facts, and are able to advocate for yourself to ensure you are receiving the best treatment for you.

Come with a Plan

One way you can advocate for yourself is to come prepared to a medical consultation by bringing a list of questions and subjective information with you. Be prepared to discuss what is bringing you to see that health care provider. What symptoms you might be experiencing? When these symptoms began? What makes you feel better and worse? How your symptoms make you feel limited in your daily life, and what you are hoping to get out of seeing that practitioner (i.e. a referral to a specialist, pain relief, etc.,.)? Many questions can arise during a medical examination, so don’t be afraid to ask for clarification, and make sure you understand the information you have been given. Research has shown, that individuals who ask specific questions about their health, may receive more comprehensive care. For example, in a 2015 article from the Journal of Family Medicine and Community Health, researchers found that when older patients were more proactive with communication to their doctors, primary care physicians were more likely to recommend both cancer screening and cancer prevention to their patients.1

On Second Opinions

When you receive a medical result, do not be afraid to get a second opinion. People seek out second opinions for various reasons: to get reassurance on a treatment protocol, to confirm the findings of a particular healthcare provider, to verify the reputation of a given institution, and even due to patient dissatisfaction in the communication or relationship with a practitioner.2-3 Whatever your reason, know that it is your right to have a second opinion to ensure you are getting the best possible care. Some research has found that second opinions have changed the diagnosis and/or course of treatment. In two studies that look at different patient populations with cancer, they found that in cases where a specialized practitioner was consulted, the accuracy of initial staging for a diagnosis increased, treatment and management of the condition was affected in about 20% of cases, and unnecessary surgeries were prevented in about 7% of cases.4-5 Thus, getting a second opinion can be very beneficial to you. Whether it changes the course of a treatment, or simply reinforces what you have already been told, seeking a second opinion can help you make educated decisions regarding your care.

Consider Both Risks and Benefits

If you are given a diagnosis and are informed of your treatment options, make sure to ask about, and consider, the risk-benefit analysis for each. The “risk-benefit analysis” is defined as “the consideration of whether a medical or surgical procedure, particularly a radical approach, is worth the risk to the patient as compared with possible benefits if the procedure is successful.”6 What this means is, it is important to weigh any treatment’s potential outcome on your quality of life, as well as your values and goals, when determining what route of care you’d like to embark on. If the risks outweigh the benefits for you personally, then it may not be a treatment worth trying. However, that is a very specific and personal decision, that must occur between you and those close to you, under the guidance of your health care provider.

Prevent Illness Before it Happens

While it is very important to be well-informed and prepared for a visit so you can better advocate for yourself, taking steps to prevent illness or injury in the first place, is crucial to promote overall well-being. Two major changes you can make in enhancing your health are diet and exercise. According to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2015-2020, 117 million individuals, which is about half of all American adults, “have one or more preventable chronic diseases,”7 which include cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, some cancers (i.e. colorectal and postmenopausal breast cancer), and poor bone health. Theses chronic diseases are related to poor quality eating habits and physical inactivity. Furthermore, more than two-thirds of adults, and nearly one-third of children, are overweight or obese, which is associated with increased health risks and higher healthcare costs.7 Key recommendations for a “healthy eating pattern” include: eating a variety of vegetables, fruits, grains, proteins, and oils, as well as fat-free or low-fat dairy, while limiting saturated fats, trans fats, added sugars, and sodium.7 Research has found that most Americans do not eat enough fruits and vegetables. However, those that do tend to eat more fruit at breakfast and in snacks throughout the day, while more vegetables are consumed at lunch and dinner.8 This is something that can be added to your routine easily to ensure you are consuming a balanced diet.

As previously mentioned, physical inactivity can contribute to poor health; however, engaging in regular physical activity helps improve your overall health and fitness, and reduces your risk for many chronic diseases. According to the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, adults aged 18-64 need at least 2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity (i.e. brisk walking), and at least 2 days of muscle strengthening activities that work all major muscle groups (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders, arms). The same recommendations are given to older adults over the age the 65 years.9 That may sound like a lot of time that you don’t have; however, the CDC reports that engaging in aerobic exercise for even 10 minutes at a time can be beneficial.9 So get on your walking shoes and start power-walking to your appointments, or to the breakroom at work!

Ok. That was a lot of information, so here is a recap:

  1. Being well-informed and prepared with questions for medical consultations allows you to better advocate for yourself, and may help you to receive more comprehensive care.
  2. Seeking a second opinion, especially when considering a major medical procedure, is something that is your right as a consumer, and can impact your diagnosis and/or course of treatment.
  3. Considering the risk-benefit of any medical or surgical intervention is important to ensure that a given treatment is appropriate for your quality of life, values, and goals.
  4. While being educated and engaged when dealing with a medical concern is important, helping to prevent illness or injury through diet and exercise are critical for maintaining a healthy life.

If you are saying to yourself, “this is too overwhelming; there is no way I can do this!”, then I will leave you with a quote from Audrey Hepburn: “Nothing is impossible. The word itself says I’m possible!” You have the information; now it is time to get out there and start leading a healthy life, so the energy and inspiration of the new year keep ringing all year long!

Sources:

  1. Kahana E, Lee JE, Kahana B, Langendoerfer KB, Marshall GL. 2015. Patient planning and initiative enhances physician recommendations for cancer screening and prevention. J Fam Med Community Health, 2(9), pii 1066.
  2. Mordechai O, Tamir S, Weyl-Ben-Arush M.2015. Seeking a second opinion in pediatric oncology. Pediatr Hematol Oncol; 32 (4): 284-9.
  3. van Dalen I, Groothoff J, Stewart R, Spreeuwenberg P, Groenewegen P, van Horn J. 2001. Motives for seeking a second opinion in orthopaedic surgery. J Health Serv Res Policy, 6 (4): 195-201.
  4. Sawan P, Rebeiz K, Schoder H, Battevi C, Moskowitz A, Ulaner GA, Dunphy GA, Mannelli L. 2017. Specialized second-opinion radiology review of PET/CT examinations for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma impacts patient care and management. Medicine, 96 (51), doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000009411.
  5. Lakhman Y, D’Anastasi M, Micco M, et al. 2016. Second-opinion interpretations of gynecologic oncologic MRI examinations by sub-specialized radiologists influence patient care. Eur Radiol;26:2089–98.
  6. “The Free Dictionary by Farlex – Medical Dictionary.” https://medical-dictionary.the freedictionary.com/risk-benefit+analysis.
  7. U.S. Department of Agriculture & U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2015-2020. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office; 2015.
  8. Moore LV, Hammer HC, Kim SA, et al. 2016. Common ways Americans are incorporating fruits and vegetables into their diet: intake patterns by meal, source and form, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2010. Public Health Nutr; 19 (14): 2535-9.
  9. “Physical Activity Basics.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4 June 2015, http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/basics /index.htm.

PH101: Running to the Bathroom Again?!

Fiona McMahon PT, DPT

Bladder problems can be vexing, it may hurt for you to pee even though ever test for infection you’ve taken has come back negative. You may find yourself incontinent after surgery or childbirth, or for no reason at all. You may find yourself waking up countless times to go, or needing to memorize every bathrooms’ location in the city because you go too often.

The bladder and the pelvic floor are intimately related and often times problems with the pelvic floor can cause real trouble with the bladder. Pelvic floor dysfunction can cause you to suffer from bladder frequency, urgency, incomplete emptying, slow stream, stream that stops and starts, bladder or urethral pain, or leaking. And by the way, it’s not just a female issue. Men and children can also have these symptoms. Learn from one of our experts, Stephanie Stamas, about how exactly the pelvic floor is related to bladder function and dysfunction, what you can do about it, and about common medical conditions affecting the bladder. Join us for this great seminar on March 14, at 7pm. Register here: pelvichealth101.eventbrite.com

And for those who can’t wait to learn about the bladder, check out our blog on bladder health here!

Location

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY

10017

Pelvic Health 101 Spring 2018 (2)

Pilates Versus Yoga

Pilates vs. Yoga Kierstin Elliott, Certified in Stott Pilates

kierstin-and-amy-e1519325647124.jpg

As a pilates instructor, I am often asked the question, “How is pilates different from yoga?” Although there are many similarities between the two practices, such as developing strength and flexibility, the differences are quite substantial.

Yoga is an ancient practice that has long been established throughout Indian culture. One major factor that sets yoga apart from pilates is the spiritual element. For many, yoga promotes an environment of self awareness in mind, body, and spirit. Although there are various styles of yoga, ranging from the lively flow of Vinyasa to the meditative holds of Yin, you have the freedom to explore and evolve the limitations of your body and mind within the practice.

Pilates is a more recent method of movement created by Joseph Pilates as a form of rehabilitation and was introduced to the States in 1920. Pilates wanted to create a practice in which injured soldiers could quickly rehab with bio-mechanics. Therefore, the apparatus’ used in the practice such as the Cadillac and Reformer, closely resemble hospital beds with springs, pulleys, and slings. Pilates is focused primarily on restoring the natural curves of the spine using these 8 founding principles: breath, concentration, control, centering, flow, alignment, precision and relaxation.

Both pilates and yoga offer numerous health benefits for the mind and body in addition to complimenting each other quite well. If you are looking for a more spiritual or meditative connection through movement, yoga is the choice for you. If you are looking to strengthen your core and improve posture, pilates will be right up your alley. Give them both a try and see what makes the most sense for your body. Finding a practice that not only feels good, but one that you also enjoy, is important for maintaining consistency and progress. Only with commitment and dedication to your practice will you discover the stronger, healthier, and happier version of you!

 

kierstinbbpt_smKierstin Elliot currently teaches Pilates at Beyond Basics Physical, Flex, Kinespirit, and offers in home training. Call the office at Beyond Basics at 212-354-2622 for more information on Kierstin!

Why seek out a physical therapist with advanced orthopedic training? The case for CFMT and OCS

Pelvic 3By: Kaitlyn Parrotte, PT, DPT, OCS, CFMT

If you have perused our website, you might have noticed that here at Beyond Basics, we have many physical therapists who have a CFMT certification, or are in the process of completing one. Now the question lies, what is a CFMT? How is this approach unique? How can this approach be of benefit to me?

The acronym CFMT stands for Certified Functional Manual Therapist. This certification is through the Institute of Physical Art (IPA), which is an organization founded by two physical therapists, Gregg and Vicky Johnson.

With the CFMT approach, we evaluate and treat every individual’s mechanical capacity (how your tissues and joints move), neuromuscular function (how your system stabilizes itself, and the coordination of muscle activation), and motor control (how an individual moves and performs daily tasks). Furthermore, we assess and retrain how these three individual components interact to ensure each person can return to the tasks/activities they need and love to do.

What this means is, when a new patient walks through our door, we don’t just focus on one small area, such as only the knee in which you report pain. Instead, we will look at the big picture by assessing your strength, amount of limb and segmental motion available to you, posture and alignment, and movement, which can be as simple as getting out of a chair, or a higher level activity such as running, weight lifting or other sport-related activity. This will allow us to get a thorough impression of what impairments you might have, and will help us determine what the cause of your symptoms and functional limitations is (what is the driver?). From here we can figure out the most effective approach to your treatment, and will apply progressive interventions that help to ensure continued benefits from each session. We have found that this approach commonly gets you back to your activity or sport faster!

Now you may be asking yourself, “Well this sounds interesting, but why does it matter?” Looking at the whole person and treating your system overall, allows us to make lasting changes, not only to a specific body part that is causing problems for you, but also with your habits of how you hold yourself and move. By becoming more aware of your body and moving with more efficiency, you will find day-to-day activities, and even sporting activities, are easier for you to perform. Furthermore, and most importantly, if you are able to move and live in a more efficient way, you are decreasing the risk of future injury.

So whether you are experiencing incontinence, pelvic pain, low back pain, or a shoulder injury, having a knowledgeable therapist work with you, can make a significant impact on your function and quality of life.