Yoga for Chronic Pelvic Pain

crop faceless lady sitting in zen pose on yoga mat
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Kathryn Ahuja PT, DPT RYT200

Patients with chronic pelvic pain (CPP) often ask, “Is there anything else I can do?” They have often been living with pain for a long time and are eager to feel better as quickly as possible. The truth is that there is no fast lane to healing CPP. Healing should integrate the biomechanical, psychological, and social factors, which can all play a part in your symptoms. Yoga can be a very effective way to address each of these players and move you towards increased freedom and function.

Biomechanical factors: How can yoga help?

Previous blog posts,Pelvic Pain Awareness Month Part 1: What is Pelvic Pain  and Pelvic Pain Awareness Month: Part 2: Hope for Chronic Pelvic Pain  have discussed how the muscles of your pelvic floor can lead to CPP. If you have lived with pain in the pelvis, genitals, reproductive and urinary organs, coccyx, or pubic bones for a long time, the pain can alter the way you move in everyday life. People with CPP tend to be less active than their peers, have altered postures, (usually with a more posteriorly tilted pelvis (a tucked tail bone) and an increased thoracic kyphosis (hunch in upper spine), and they tend to adopt ways of sitting or standing that is protective of their painful spots (Zhang 2015). It makes sense! Pain in this area of the body makes us just want to curl up in a ball and stay there!

Being curled up like a cashew all day has a real influence on your pain. Our bodies are designed to move and when we stay in one place for a long time our joints get stiff, blood flow to and from our tissues is impaired, and the muscles that should help us stand tall become weak and tight. It can become difficult to actually differentiate the pain that is coming from your pelvic floor and the discomfort you may feel because of the adaptations you have made because of this pain.

Practicing yoga poses called asanas is an effective, safe way to get you moving again. Standing poses like warrior II (Virabhadrasana II) and crescent lunge (Anjaneyasana) simultaneously lengthen and strengthen the muscles of your legs and hips. When these muscles regain their function, it can help your pelvic floor muscles to back off any chronic holding patterns. Backward bends like cobra (Bhujangasana) or camel pose (Ustrasana) help restore the natural curves of your spine while lengthening any tension in the abdominal muscles. This may make it a little easier to keep your body in an upright posture throughout your day. Supine stretches like butterfly (Baddha Konasana) or happy baby (Ananda Balasana) can help ease tension in the muscles of the inner thighs (adductors) while you are supported by the floor. When these muscles relax, there can be a noticeable reduction in pain since trigger points in the adductors can refer to the genitals and pubic bone.

In a study performed in India, 30 women who attended a 1-hour yoga class five times weekly for eight weeks saw significant reduction in their pelvic pain ratings compared to the start of the intervention. These women also showed a significant reduction in pain scores compared to women who only took NSAIDS for pain relief over the same time. The researchers theorized that the intervention was effective not only due to the effects of the stretching and strengthening, but also because of the relaxation exercises which “modify neurological pain perception which could be the mechanism for pain reduction” (Saxena, 2017). This research suggests that yoga is doing something more than addressing the muscles. It may actually change the brains of those who practice.

Psychological factors: How can yoga help?

Ask any regular yogi and they will tell you that there is much more to the practice than just the asanas. It turns out, there is some really interesting science behind the feel good vibes you might experience after a yoga class.

Yoga is different from many other forms of exercise because there is an intentional focus on your breath. In Hindu philosophy, prana means not only breath, but “life force.” It is believed that one’s breath has tremendous power and in performing pranayama (breathing exercises) we can strengthen and harness that energy. Today, we understand that breathing does more for our bodies than move air in and out and we have even greater appreciation for this ancient philosophy.

You are probably familiar with the idea that slow, deep breathing can help to calm you down. The mechanism that drives this response is called the parasympathetic nervous system (PNS). Deep, slow breathing sends a message to your brain that you are not under a direct threat. The PNS then works to shift you out of “fight or flight” mode and into a calmer, more peaceful state. If you have CPP, your body might live in a constant state of fight or flight. Pranayama exercises have been shown to help quiet those signals and strengthen the signals from your PNS. With a consistent practice of slow, deep breathing you can actually shift your whole body towards a parasympathetic dominant state (Gerritsen, 2018).

Depression and anxiety are common comorbidities for people with CPP. Yoga can help to shift your mood which may also have an effect on your perceived pain. A randomized control trial evaluated the levels of a neurotransmitter called GABA in people with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and in a healthy control group. GABA is an inhibitory neurotransmitter that helps to regulate important cortical functions including mood. When compared to the control group, those with MDD had significantly lower levels of brain GABA. After completing a 12-week yoga program however, there was no difference in these levels between groups. Even more importantly depressive symptoms decreased significantly in the MDD group and anxiety levels improved for both groups (Streeter, 2018).

These stunning changes do not seem to be attributable to all forms of exercise. In comparison to people who walked for one hour, those who did yoga for the same amount of time had greater increases in GABA as well as improvements in mood scores (Streeter, 2010). While this study was small, it makes a great case for future research to determine if yoga may be a suitable alternative to medication for those with serious anxiety or depression.

Social factors: how can yoga help?

Persistent pain can have a profound effect on how you interact with the world. Symptoms of CPP are not visible to others and we tend to not talk about them with most friends and colleagues. Throbbing, aching, and stinging sensations can make you more irritable, less willing to put on certain clothing, or cause you to avoid aggravating activities. This can put a real strain on all your relationships. Emotional distress from fraying relationships can be difficult to manage when you are trying to heal and could even stress you to the point of making your symptoms worse.

If you are limited in your daily functions or feel that your quality of life suffers due to CPP symptoms, there is evidence to support using yoga to intervene. Women with pelvic pain had improved emotional well being and sexual function scores after a 6-week yoga course consisting of about 3 hours of yoga per week. At the end of the program, 75% of the participants indicated they felt the yoga program was something they could continue to do without guidance (Huang, 2017). It can be quite empowering to feel like you have control of your symptoms and are not reliant on a doctor or PT to “fix” you. Additionally, a yoga class can be a nice way to socialize while doing something positive for your body.

Yoga may not totally eliminate the pain you feel, but it may help you to manage your symptoms more elegantly. Breathing techniques can assist when symptoms strike at work. Mindfulness about your body can help you determine when it is appropriate to push yourself and when you need to rest. Mastering a tricky posture is very rewarding and may encourage you to open up to other novel challenges.

Ready to give it a try?

As with all new forms of exercise, if you are looking to try yoga for CPP you should seek out a class with a knowledgeable instructor who can offer modifications and cue your alignment appropriately. Start slow and never be afraid to ask your teacher a question if something does not feel right in your body. At first, the hardest part might just be learning to be still and breathe deeply: that’s ok, and it will get easier!

Please consider joining me for our virtual yoga class every Tuesday at 7pm. Click here

for more details.

References

Gerritsen RJS, Band GPH. Breath of Life: The Respiratory Vagal Stimulation Model of Contemplative Activity. Front Hum Neurosci. 2018;12:397. Published 2018 Oct 9. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2018.00397

Huang AJ, Rowen TS, Abercrombie P, et al. Development and Feasibility of a Group-Based Therapeutic Yoga Program for Women with Chronic Pelvic Pain. Pain Med. 2017;18(10):1864‐1872. doi:10.1093/pm/pnw306

Saxena R, Gupta M, Shankar N, Jain S, Saxena A. Effects of yogic intervention on pain scores and quality of life in females with chronic pelvic pain. Int J Yoga 2017;10:9-15

Streeter C, Gerbag P, Nielsen G, Brown R, Jensen JE and Marisa Silveri. The Effects of Yoga on Thalamic Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid, Mood and Depression: Analysis of Two Randomized Controlled Trials. Neuropsychiatry Journ. 2018;8(6).

Streeter CC, Whitfield TH, Owen L, et al. Effects of yoga versus walking on mood, anxiety, and brain GABA levels: a randomized controlled MRS study. J Altern Complement Med. 2010;16(11):1145‐1152. doi:10.1089/acm.2010.000

Zhang R, Chomistek AK, Dimitrakoff JD, et al. Physical activity and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2015;47(4):757‐764. doi:10.1249/MSS.0000000000000472

Running During a Pandemic

 

Fiona McMahon PT, DPT

running picture

Hello all!

We in NYC are closing in on completing our very first six weeks and counting, of social distancing. It has been tough. Many of us have had to drastically uproot our lives and routine to help keep our communities as safe as possible. For many of us, our daily escape of a yoga class in a studio or a lifting session at the gym is on pause. As a result, we are turning en masse to running, many for the very first time. As with any time you add a new exercise, one must proceed with caution as your body begins to adjust to the new exercise, throw in a global pandemic, and things get a lot more complicated. To guide you through this transition, we have compiled practical tips to start your running journey.

Socially Distant (and Responsible) Running

You want to protect yourself while running, but if you are feeling laissez faire about your own health, (maybe you’re young and healthy), you must remember that as a runner, you are a much larger threat to other people than they are to you. Anytime you are working out, you are exhaling more breath in volume, than someone walking at a moderate pace. That increase in breath volume, and thus respiratory droplets makes you far more likely to pass anything on if you are carrying a covid infection. You must do what is in your power to avoid getting others sick. No exercise is worth harming others.

In NYC, you are required to wear a face mask if you cannot avoid being within 6 feet of another person. For most running areas in NYC, it is nearly impossible to maintain 6 feet, so opt for a moisture wicking gaiter, to prevent any chapping of your lips. Keep in mind that running with a face mask can be more difficult, so go easy on yourself. You are running to get your ya-ya’s out, not to break a world record, so take plenty of walk breaks if you need them.

For those of you who do not live in a densely populated area, continue to try and maintain 6 feet. Take back roads, rather than main drags and run on off hours to avoid large crowds. Run against the flow of vehicular traffic so you can easily determine if it is safe to dart into the road safely (maintaining 6 feet) to overtake a fellow runner or walker. When it is not possible to avoid coming within 6 feet of someone else on your path, be prepared to stop altogether, or dart up onto someone’s lawn or driveway.

How to Start

If you aren’t a seasoned runner a run/walk program can be a really nice place to start. Starting by alternating walking 2 minutes and running for 30 seconds for 20 minutes is a good way to dip your running toes into the water. Also there are scads of really lovely couch to 5k programs out there to build you up from a novice jogger to a confident runner.

Volume of Training

With all this time on our hands, it can be really easy to up your weekly mileage. Your agenda is practically clear, why not bust out a 16 miler everyday? In general, bumping up your mileage by more than 10% a week is a fast-track way to invite injury. So if you are typically running 20 miles a week, bumping up to 22 miles a week is fine, but more than that can invite injury.

 

Stretch and Strengthen

Most runners will happily trade 10 minutes of stretching for an extra mile on the road. Don’t do it. Stretching after a run, when your muscles are still nice and warm can help prevent injury and keep you up and running. Stretching through your quads, hamstrings, inner thighs, and calves are all great places to start.

To run well, our bodies require lots of strength to stabilize our joints and provide us the power to gain speed. Core strength is essential as well as learning to perform core strength exercises properly. Did you know that your pelvic floor is part of the core too? Amy Stein, founder of Beyond Basics Physical Therapy, writes about it here.  Even on lock down, virtually meeting with your physical therapist will help you to review stretches and stability exercises specific to your body.

Beyond Basics is still open and taking patients, as well as providing virtual appointments. If you require treatment at this time, please call 212-354-2622

Saggy Jeans and Tailfeathers: How Your Pelvic Positioning Affects Your Body

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Joanna Hess PT, DPT, PRC, WCS

Wait! Marie Kondo has you throwing out your favorite jeans because the joyless saggy bottoms that your tushy cannot manage to fill out? We are seeing an epidemic flat butt among mamas, plumbers, barre fanatics, and office workers—all with strangely similar symptoms—pelvic floor dysfunction, low back and sacroiliac pain, and a tucked under pelvis. In this blog we will explore why the position of the pelvis, the maker of flat butts and the maker of less flat booties, is important and how to more easily move out of this position for benefit beyond your behind.

Besides needing a new wardrobe, why should I care about my flat bum?

The flat bum or preference towards posterior pelvic tilting shrinks the distance between the front and back of pelvic outlet which changes pelvic floor muscle tension. The body needs access to the full range of the pelvis and pelvic floor muscles. Over time, this position could cause excessive pelvic floor activity to compensate for the loss of resting tension. Think of the pelvic floor muscles simplified as a rubber band between two points, the pubic bone and tailbone. When the distance between the two points decreases, the rubber band loses its stability from resting tension. Changes in pelvic position alters stability from the pelvic floor muscles. This posterior pelvic tilt position also decreases the accessibility for hip extension and therefore the upper glute muscles get sleepy. As the top of the pelvis moves back, the sacroiliac joint in the low back opens and decreases its bony stability. Translated into everyday life, the flat butt position increases the potential for incontinence, pelvic floor muscle tension, sacroiliac pain, and decreased efficiency in movement.

The Flat Bottom. Only in the eye of the beholder?

Pelvic floor and tilt

The disagreement of the “neutral pelvis” or zero-point causes confusion when describing pelvic tilt—anterior pelvic tilt, posterior pelvic tilt, and neutral pelvis. Some argue that the neutral pelvis is when the ASIS’s (front hip bones) are level to the PSIS (back butt dimples). Others say that the pelvis is neutral when ASIS’s are in the same plane as the pubic bone. Or for those with X-ray vision, pelvic tilt is the vector of the sacral angle at S2 in relation to the vertical axis. But often, neutral pelvic position is subjective to the observer and relative to other parts of the body—namely the spine/rib cage and thigh bone. Clinically, this “neutral pelvis” is hard to find because 1) pelvis’ are shaped very differently, 2) left and right pelvis on the same person can also be quite different, 3) feeling these bony landmarks have been shown to be remarkably unreliable, 4) the neutral pelvis should be on top of vertical thigh bones. See how the eyes can be tricked confusing spinal curve focusing on pelvic tilt without also including rib position.

Rib pelvic alignmentThe inability to move in and out of posterior pelvic tilt and anterior pelvic tilt decreases efficiency and possibly results in pain and instability. Anterior pelvic tilt is when the front part of the pelvis moves forward/down. Posterior pelvic tilt is when the front part of the pelvis moves back/up. A neutral pelvis on top of vertical femurs and happy rib cage should correlate with better muscle performance.

Do I have a flat butt?

Aside from the saggy jeans, the flat butts of the world have a few other correlations.

1. The Tailfeather Test: Stand comfortably and squeeze the gluts.

a. Neutral pelvis: Thigh bones rotate.

b. Posterior tilt-ing pelvis: The butt will further tuck under and mainly access the lower glutes.

c. Anterior tilt-ing pelvis: The pelvic floor muscles will do most of the work.

2. You bear weight more in the heels

3. Back of your rib cage is behind your pelvis

4. Your Thigh bones are angled so that your pelvis is front of your knees

5. Your lower belly pooch

6. You Sit with pressure more on the sacrum/tailbone vs. sit bone

7. You have Overactive and possibly overworking pelvic floor muscles—the front to back pelvic distance decreases with your posterior tilted pelvis and loses the resting tension from length. As described earlier, this is similar to tensile strength of a slightly stretched rubber band vs. rubber band without pull/tension. Therefore, your pelvic floor muscles have to work harder to keep some type of tension for purposes like continence, stability, etc. The inability for the pelvic floor muscles to work optimally can lead to incontinence, pain, and constipation.

9. You have Breathing and abdominal pressure problems

10. You have Sacroiliac joint pain. As the pelvis tips back, the sacrum moves away from the ilium decreasing the bony stability. The hip muscles have to work harder, but as felt in the Tailfeather Test, the glut muscles aren’t in a good place to work.

Is there a better fix than butt implants?

Bodies have and love variability for posterior, anterior and “neutral” pelvic positioning. The brain likes positions where muscles and nerves work with ease and stability—life shouldn’t be so difficult—but it needs the chance to choose and learn it. Folks working with bodies have traditionally “corrected” spinal curves by changing pelvic position. From what has already been discussed, spinal and pelvic position can be altered many different ways—from the changing weight-bearing area in the feet, to position of ribs and range of breath, and even head angles with visual and vestibular input. Consider these hacks into pelvic stability until the brain learns how to access this stability in many situations and positions.

1. Standing. Bring your chin down to your neck and keep looking down until you see the front of your ankles. You’ve just untucked your pelvis and brought your ribs over your pelvis. This one is courtesy of my colleague, Stephanie Stamas. Or check in to feel where the weight is going through your feet. The front to middle of the foot is a good place to start and then do the Tailfeather Test. You might have to toggle other parts of the body because of how the body will compensate in the chain.

2. Sitting. Get your hips as far back as possible. Or put a pillow in the back of the chair so that your hips can find the pillow and you are sitting on top of your sit bones. Then, relax the trunk into the seat back/pillow. Again, you’ve untucked your pelvis and brought your ribs over the pelvis.

3. Better squats/lunges/burpees/stairs/ab work. You can do 5 sets of 20 squats, but still no junk? Take care to see if your pelvis is tucking under in the movement. If so, use an inhale to keep the pelvic floor lengthening as your hips bend in movement. Later, the movement should be dissociated with breath pattern (as long as you are breathing.)

4. See a physical therapist. Often times, the habits of pelvic tucking are a little more complicated because it is a protective and compensatory mechanism for stability. A physical therapist can help with seeing the bigger picture and how different parts of the body relate to each other. They can also help facilitate better movement through manual therapy and specialized movement.

Good luck with the joy sparking!

Pilates with Kierstin: The Plank

Kierstin Elliott, Pilates Rehab Specialist

Exercise: Plank

Set Up: Start on all fours with the shoulders stacked on top of wrists, lats engaged, collar bones broad, and chin slightly tucked to create length through the back of the neck.

Execution: Inhale to prep, exhale to extend one leg at a time back into a full plank position. Abs and glutes engage while nothing in the upper body shifts. Create a sense of length from the crown of the head through the heels. Hold anywhere from 10 seconds to a minute maintaining proper form.

Focus: Three key focal points when performing a plank: 1. Be sure to not sink into the shoulders. Push away from the mat, broaden collar bones, engage lats and serratus (your side body), and keep the back of the neck lengthened. The upper back should be flat, not rounded. 2. Support the lower back. Abdominal engagement is critical in this exercise and includes knitting ribs together, drawing navel to spine, and creating a hollowed out feeling in the lower abdomen in order to achieve optimum support for the lower back. 3. Create a sense of length. Constant energy reaching through the crown of the head to the heels will give you a sense of lift making the plank feel lighter. P.S. Don’t grip the glutes, but engage them slightly for more support.

Importance: Planks are a killer full body exercise. Everything has to be on, including the brain, in order to execute this exercise correctly. Planks allow you to target shoulder stability, core strength in its entirety, and mental/physical endurance.

Modifications: To modify, keep knees under the hips, tuck the toes and hover knees off the mat. Focus on the same cues for full plank. To add a challenge, well… the options are endless! Try adding alternating leg lifts, mountain climbers, or walk down to forearms and back up to hands without shifting hips side to side.

Pilates with Kiertsin! The Saw

Kierstin Elliott, Pilates Rehab Specialist

Exercise: Saw

Set Up: Seated with legs extended mat distance apart and arms extended out to the side.

Execution: Inhale to prep, exhale to rotate torso right as you flex forward (nose toward knee) reaching your left hand toward the outside of the right foot. Reach the pinky finger to the pinky toe a little further 3 times (creating a saw like action) before rolling up through the spine. Inhale as you pass through center and rotate left as you repeat the same actions on the left side. Complete 3 rounds.

Focus: Focus on anchoring the opposite hip to the mat while reaching toward the foot. Be sure to keep a flexed spine versus an extended spine while folding forward over the leg. Lastly, keep shoulders out of the ears (IE. Relax your shoulders) while reaching toward foot.

Importance: Spinal rotation and hamstring length! It’s so easy to track improvement with this one 🙂

Modifications: For extra tight hamstrings or hip flexors, sit on a bolster or a couple yoga blocks to elevate the pelvis.

Pilates with Kierstin! Thoracic Mobility

Kierstin Elliott

Exercise: Thoracic Mobility

Set Up: Set up your foam roller vertically (so it runs up and down your spine). Sit on a mat with the end of the foam roller placed right between the bottom tips of your shoulder blades. Lean back into the roller with arms stretched back so hands are gently placed on either side of roller. Place feet flat on the mat, parallel.

Execution: Inhale to prep, exhale to lift hips off the mat, finding extension through the psoas. Inhale to lower hips down. After about 3-5 hip lifts, reposition the roller a couple inches further up the back, mid shoulder blades. Repeat hip lifts. Pause here with hips on the mat and take a few lateral bends right and left, allowing the roller to become an extension of your spine. After about 4-6 reps on each side, reposition the roller one more time towards the top of your thoracic spine (upper shoulder blades), being careful not to place it on the neck. Repeat the hip lifts.

Focus: Focus on stabilizing your pelvis during lateral flexion and connecting to breath during the hip lifts.

Importance: Mobilizing the thoracic spine! This alone comes with so many benefits: deeper, expansive breath, more accessible spinal rotation, mobile shoulders, greater spinal extension and flexion, better connection to core, etc.

Modifications: Place a small pillow or towel roll under head if neck support is needed. Take a few moments after the lateral flexion for some snow angels to stretch the pecs and open the chest.

How to Stay Whole During the Holdiays

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Fiona McMahon PT DPT (She, her, hers)

It feels like it started early this year, didn’t it? The day after Halloween the Bryant Park Christmas fair was up and running. Little wreaths and twinkly lights adorn the downtowns of the tri-state area. Yesterday, (I am sitting down to write this blog on November 11th) I saw an adorable little boy absolutely losing his mind with joy over a Santa statue at my local drug store. It was excessively adorable. It’s a sweet time of year, filled with beauty and love, but it can also be a super stressful time of year filled with obligations, travel, shopping, expectations, and the bittersweet longing for those who cannot celebrate with us this year. In short, the holidays are loaded. There are elements of the holiday that will never not be stressful. It is stressful to fling yourself from event to event while trying to maintain some modicum of self-care, but in this blog, we will discuss practical tips to protect your holiday and better yet your peace of mind during this time of year.

Boundaries

Oh the B-word. Boundaries. Much like a fence, boundaries can be protective and can provide your friends and family with a clear set of expectations for how you want to be treated and what they can and cannot expect from you. Sounds a tad harsh, but what’s harsher is getting upset with your loved ones when they do things that they had no idea would bother you. Boundaries should be clear cut and judgement free. A good example, for most families is discussing politics. If political discussions, especially if your family’s views vary greatly from yours, are stressful, you may want to set up some boundaries around it. You may say, “ I would prefer not to discuss politics tonight at the holiday table, if we do discuss politics, I will excuse myself to the living room”. Excusing yourself to the living room is not meant to be punitive. You are not punishing your relatives for discussing politics, you are simply excusing yourself from a potentially divisive and argument starting topic that will upset you. You cannot control the actions of others, but you can control how you react to those actions, hopefully with kindness while keeping your boundaries intact.

Another way to set boundaries is setting boundaries with your time. For most of us with the crazy schedule of the holidays there are certain rituals that fall by the wayside. It’s okay to have some elements of your routine be non negotiable, like your 30 minute jog or morning meditation session, Holding onto the activities that bring you peace can best allow you to show up and be present for all of the holiday festivities.

Planning

You don’t have to do it all. Not every party requires your attendance, not every bake sale requires your dessert, and you can allow some things to slide. At the beginning of the season decide what is really important to you. Is the “coats for kids” fundraiser really meaningful? Put it up on your list, but could you let your work friend’s party slide? Cool, buy yourself some extra time. Look at your weeks and decide what is not only realistic, but healthy for you. Maybe if there are a few parties you want to go to, you could give yourself a day or two off from your workout routine and (here’s the important part) be kind to yourself about taking a break. You can say no. I believe holiday cheer to be a finite resource so save it up for what matters to you.

Diet

Loaded, loaded, loaded topic. But the holidays are where we can fall into some really unhealthy eating habits, which can make us feel really crappy. Try to mix in some healthy food with your holiday treats. I’ve quoted this Oscar Wilde quote (which I have misattributed to Mark Twain, full disclosure), “everything in moderation, including moderation.”, which I think is an excellent mantra to take into the holidays. Sometimes you gotta have a little fun and indulge, but being mindful of how much and how often, can help us to feel our best during the holidays. Make sure along with your cookies you are getting some vegetables and lean protein to keep your blood sugar stable. Limit alcohol to the best of your abilities as it can decrease the quality of your sleep, to avoid the trap of over caffeination and requiring a nightcap to sleep.

Self care

Leave time if you can for exercise and movement and time just for yourself. It allows you time to check in with yourself and see how you are doing as well as time to sit back and reflect/appreciate the holidays.

Self Kindness

The holidays and year’s end can be a time when we look back at our year and evaluate how far we have come. It can be easy to dwell on our shortcomings, and although they can provide important direction for our future goals, it is also a brilliant time to reflect on your achievements. You have successfully gotten yourself through another year, Heck! Another decade, where you have grown and learned valuable lessons, which makes you all that more deserving of some good ol’ holiday cheer.

Happy Holidays from the Beyond Basics Family.

hollerday!

 

 

BBPT Health Tip: How Not to Mess Up Your Back this Holiday Season

Fiona McMahon DPT

low angle photography of atlas statue
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Chances are doing some traveling over the coming months. The holidays are a time when we haul luggage through airports, Christmas trees and boxes of decorations through your house, or load massive turkeys into the oven. With all this lifting on the docket, I have a pretty good hunch you don’t want to start the new year with a heating pad and lying down in bed, so I am going to share with you, some of my favorite lifting tips.

Get close to what you are lifting:

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I mean really close. Maybe hug it if you can. The reason why we should get close to what we are lifting calls back to high school physics. The force on the spine equals the weight of the object being lifted by the distance it is away from the spine. Therefore, the farther an object is away from you, the harder it is on the spine to lift. My co-workers use the term “T-Rex arms” to describe how close they want their patients to be holding what they are lifting.

 

Squat

Don’t lift with your back. You have all heard it a million times, but if you bend forward with your back to pick up what you are lifting, you will end up placing a tremendous strain on the muscles and bones of your spine. Just don’t do it. Instead, bend with your knees to get to what you want to lift, and push through your legs to stand back up.

Don’t be a Hero

Ask for help if something seems too heavy to lift. In the long run, everyone will be better off. Knowing when to ask for help is sometimes the most challenging part of safe lifting practices.  If you feel you are asking for more help than you would like or you have back pain that is not resolving, come see us at Beyond Basics to help you get back into lifting shape.  The sooner, the better.  You don’t want it to become a chronic problem.  

Fiona McMahon PT, DPT practices at our Midtown location

fiona2018

How to Start a New Exercise Program When You’re Feeling Intimidated

How to Start a New Exercise Program When You’re Feeling Intimidated

woman stretching on ground
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Kierstin Elliott

Maybe you were an avid gym-goer, cross fitter, or yogi and then you got injured. Or maybe fitness has never been a part of your life, but now your doctor or PT has told you that a fitness regimen is necessary in order to help you feel like yourself again. Whatever the case may be, you just don’t know where to start, or you feel intimidated to return to what you were doing in the past because that is how you got injured in the first place. My advice is to start slowly. Educate yourself on how and why you got injured and what the next steps are on your road to recovery. Set goals on what you need to accomplish and build a plan to achieve them. Last but not least, train smartly. If you follow this check list, then you should definitely feel more confident moving forward!

It is imperative when you are transitioning from injury rehab to the fitness world, or starting a new exercise program for the first time, that you build a foundation. It is so crucial you stay true to your journey and not compare yourself to others. Trust that progress takes time. Resist the urge to jump right into something new if you’re unsure about form, alignment, and technique.

The first step would be to invest in private sessions. Educate yourself on what you’re getting into and find an expert in what you want to master. Having a coach who devotes the entire hour to your body and your needs will help you garner a deeper understanding of how your breath, body, and mind connect. Learning the proper form with a watchful eye on alignment, will ensure you have a strong foundation to move forward or join group classes.

Once you’ve gained confidence with your new (or old) exercise program, set some fitness goals. You’ve laid a strong foundation and now it’s time to build a skyscraper! Do you want to improve strength, flexibility, endurance? Once you have clear goals set, create a timeline. Establishing a realistic timeline will hold you accountable to sticking with your exercise program and crushing your goals!

The point I’ll end with is to train smartly. No matter what discipline you train in, if you are not focused on form, alignment, and breath control, you are only setting yourself up for future injuries. If you are in a group class, don’t be afraid to ask questions if something is unclear, doesn’t feel quite right, or if you know you need a modification. If you are doing an at home workout on your own, try to do it in front of a mirror to check out your form. If there’s no mirror accessible, simply take it slow and use the knowledge you’ve acquired from a trainer, coach, or PT. Take notes. Practice. Your exercises won’t be perfect the first time you attempt them. Be patient and mindful. It’s all about the journey 🙂

PH101: Ladies Session

By: Fiona McMahon, DPT
Hey Ladies!!! In the next installment of our Pelvic Health 101 course, we are hosting a ladies’ session to allow for a safe and non-threatening place to discuss many issues that can affect the health of your pelvic floor. This class one of Stephanie Stamas’s (the founder of PH101’s ) favorites and is definitely not to be missed. Hear more about it in her video below! Join us at 7pm on October 30th . Please register at pelvichealth101.eventbrite.com

 

Location

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY

10017

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