Pilates with Kiertsin! The Saw

Kierstin Elliott, Pilates Rehab Specialist

Exercise: Saw

Set Up: Seated with legs extended mat distance apart and arms extended out to the side.

Execution: Inhale to prep, exhale to rotate torso right as you flex forward (nose toward knee) reaching your left hand toward the outside of the right foot. Reach the pinky finger to the pinky toe a little further 3 times (creating a saw like action) before rolling up through the spine. Inhale as you pass through center and rotate left as you repeat the same actions on the left side. Complete 3 rounds.

Focus: Focus on anchoring the opposite hip to the mat while reaching toward the foot. Be sure to keep a flexed spine versus an extended spine while folding forward over the leg. Lastly, keep shoulders out of the ears (IE. Relax your shoulders) while reaching toward foot.

Importance: Spinal rotation and hamstring length! It’s so easy to track improvement with this one 🙂

Modifications: For extra tight hamstrings or hip flexors, sit on a bolster or a couple yoga blocks to elevate the pelvis.

Pilates with Kierstin! Thoracic Mobility

Kierstin Elliott

Exercise: Thoracic Mobility

Set Up: Set up your foam roller vertically (so it runs up and down your spine). Sit on a mat with the end of the foam roller placed right between the bottom tips of your shoulder blades. Lean back into the roller with arms stretched back so hands are gently placed on either side of roller. Place feet flat on the mat, parallel.

Execution: Inhale to prep, exhale to lift hips off the mat, finding extension through the psoas. Inhale to lower hips down. After about 3-5 hip lifts, reposition the roller a couple inches further up the back, mid shoulder blades. Repeat hip lifts. Pause here with hips on the mat and take a few lateral bends right and left, allowing the roller to become an extension of your spine. After about 4-6 reps on each side, reposition the roller one more time towards the top of your thoracic spine (upper shoulder blades), being careful not to place it on the neck. Repeat the hip lifts.

Focus: Focus on stabilizing your pelvis during lateral flexion and connecting to breath during the hip lifts.

Importance: Mobilizing the thoracic spine! This alone comes with so many benefits: deeper, expansive breath, more accessible spinal rotation, mobile shoulders, greater spinal extension and flexion, better connection to core, etc.

Modifications: Place a small pillow or towel roll under head if neck support is needed. Take a few moments after the lateral flexion for some snow angels to stretch the pecs and open the chest.

How to Stay Whole During the Holdiays

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Fiona McMahon PT DPT (She, her, hers)

It feels like it started early this year, didn’t it? The day after Halloween the Bryant Park Christmas fair was up and running. Little wreaths and twinkly lights adorn the downtowns of the tri-state area. Yesterday, (I am sitting down to write this blog on November 11th) I saw an adorable little boy absolutely losing his mind with joy over a Santa statue at my local drug store. It was excessively adorable. It’s a sweet time of year, filled with beauty and love, but it can also be a super stressful time of year filled with obligations, travel, shopping, expectations, and the bittersweet longing for those who cannot celebrate with us this year. In short, the holidays are loaded. There are elements of the holiday that will never not be stressful. It is stressful to fling yourself from event to event while trying to maintain some modicum of self-care, but in this blog, we will discuss practical tips to protect your holiday and better yet your peace of mind during this time of year.

Boundaries

Oh the B-word. Boundaries. Much like a fence, boundaries can be protective and can provide your friends and family with a clear set of expectations for how you want to be treated and what they can and cannot expect from you. Sounds a tad harsh, but what’s harsher is getting upset with your loved ones when they do things that they had no idea would bother you. Boundaries should be clear cut and judgement free. A good example, for most families is discussing politics. If political discussions, especially if your family’s views vary greatly from yours, are stressful, you may want to set up some boundaries around it. You may say, “ I would prefer not to discuss politics tonight at the holiday table, if we do discuss politics, I will excuse myself to the living room”. Excusing yourself to the living room is not meant to be punitive. You are not punishing your relatives for discussing politics, you are simply excusing yourself from a potentially divisive and argument starting topic that will upset you. You cannot control the actions of others, but you can control how you react to those actions, hopefully with kindness while keeping your boundaries intact.

Another way to set boundaries is setting boundaries with your time. For most of us with the crazy schedule of the holidays there are certain rituals that fall by the wayside. It’s okay to have some elements of your routine be non negotiable, like your 30 minute jog or morning meditation session, Holding onto the activities that bring you peace can best allow you to show up and be present for all of the holiday festivities.

Planning

You don’t have to do it all. Not every party requires your attendance, not every bake sale requires your dessert, and you can allow some things to slide. At the beginning of the season decide what is really important to you. Is the “coats for kids” fundraiser really meaningful? Put it up on your list, but could you let your work friend’s party slide? Cool, buy yourself some extra time. Look at your weeks and decide what is not only realistic, but healthy for you. Maybe if there are a few parties you want to go to, you could give yourself a day or two off from your workout routine and (here’s the important part) be kind to yourself about taking a break. You can say no. I believe holiday cheer to be a finite resource so save it up for what matters to you.

Diet

Loaded, loaded, loaded topic. But the holidays are where we can fall into some really unhealthy eating habits, which can make us feel really crappy. Try to mix in some healthy food with your holiday treats. I’ve quoted this Oscar Wilde quote (which I have misattributed to Mark Twain, full disclosure), “everything in moderation, including moderation.”, which I think is an excellent mantra to take into the holidays. Sometimes you gotta have a little fun and indulge, but being mindful of how much and how often, can help us to feel our best during the holidays. Make sure along with your cookies you are getting some vegetables and lean protein to keep your blood sugar stable. Limit alcohol to the best of your abilities as it can decrease the quality of your sleep, to avoid the trap of over caffeination and requiring a nightcap to sleep.

Self care

Leave time if you can for exercise and movement and time just for yourself. It allows you time to check in with yourself and see how you are doing as well as time to sit back and reflect/appreciate the holidays.

Self Kindness

The holidays and year’s end can be a time when we look back at our year and evaluate how far we have come. It can be easy to dwell on our shortcomings, and although they can provide important direction for our future goals, it is also a brilliant time to reflect on your achievements. You have successfully gotten yourself through another year, Heck! Another decade, where you have grown and learned valuable lessons, which makes you all that more deserving of some good ol’ holiday cheer.

Happy Holidays from the Beyond Basics Family.

hollerday!

 

 

BBPT Health Tip: How Not to Mess Up Your Back this Holiday Season

Fiona McMahon DPT

low angle photography of atlas statue
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Chances are doing some traveling over the coming months. The holidays are a time when we haul luggage through airports, Christmas trees and boxes of decorations through your house, or load massive turkeys into the oven. With all this lifting on the docket, I have a pretty good hunch you don’t want to start the new year with a heating pad and lying down in bed, so I am going to share with you, some of my favorite lifting tips.

Get close to what you are lifting:

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I mean really close. Maybe hug it if you can. The reason why we should get close to what we are lifting calls back to high school physics. The force on the spine equals the weight of the object being lifted by the distance it is away from the spine. Therefore, the farther an object is away from you, the harder it is on the spine to lift. My co-workers use the term “T-Rex arms” to describe how close they want their patients to be holding what they are lifting.

 

Squat

Don’t lift with your back. You have all heard it a million times, but if you bend forward with your back to pick up what you are lifting, you will end up placing a tremendous strain on the muscles and bones of your spine. Just don’t do it. Instead, bend with your knees to get to what you want to lift, and push through your legs to stand back up.

Don’t be a Hero

Ask for help if something seems too heavy to lift. In the long run, everyone will be better off. Knowing when to ask for help is sometimes the most challenging part of safe lifting practices.  If you feel you are asking for more help than you would like or you have back pain that is not resolving, come see us at Beyond Basics to help you get back into lifting shape.  The sooner, the better.  You don’t want it to become a chronic problem.  

Fiona McMahon PT, DPT practices at our Midtown location

fiona2018

How to Start a New Exercise Program When You’re Feeling Intimidated

How to Start a New Exercise Program When You’re Feeling Intimidated

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Kierstin Elliott

Maybe you were an avid gym-goer, cross fitter, or yogi and then you got injured. Or maybe fitness has never been a part of your life, but now your doctor or PT has told you that a fitness regimen is necessary in order to help you feel like yourself again. Whatever the case may be, you just don’t know where to start, or you feel intimidated to return to what you were doing in the past because that is how you got injured in the first place. My advice is to start slowly. Educate yourself on how and why you got injured and what the next steps are on your road to recovery. Set goals on what you need to accomplish and build a plan to achieve them. Last but not least, train smartly. If you follow this check list, then you should definitely feel more confident moving forward!

It is imperative when you are transitioning from injury rehab to the fitness world, or starting a new exercise program for the first time, that you build a foundation. It is so crucial you stay true to your journey and not compare yourself to others. Trust that progress takes time. Resist the urge to jump right into something new if you’re unsure about form, alignment, and technique.

The first step would be to invest in private sessions. Educate yourself on what you’re getting into and find an expert in what you want to master. Having a coach who devotes the entire hour to your body and your needs will help you garner a deeper understanding of how your breath, body, and mind connect. Learning the proper form with a watchful eye on alignment, will ensure you have a strong foundation to move forward or join group classes.

Once you’ve gained confidence with your new (or old) exercise program, set some fitness goals. You’ve laid a strong foundation and now it’s time to build a skyscraper! Do you want to improve strength, flexibility, endurance? Once you have clear goals set, create a timeline. Establishing a realistic timeline will hold you accountable to sticking with your exercise program and crushing your goals!

The point I’ll end with is to train smartly. No matter what discipline you train in, if you are not focused on form, alignment, and breath control, you are only setting yourself up for future injuries. If you are in a group class, don’t be afraid to ask questions if something is unclear, doesn’t feel quite right, or if you know you need a modification. If you are doing an at home workout on your own, try to do it in front of a mirror to check out your form. If there’s no mirror accessible, simply take it slow and use the knowledge you’ve acquired from a trainer, coach, or PT. Take notes. Practice. Your exercises won’t be perfect the first time you attempt them. Be patient and mindful. It’s all about the journey 🙂

PH101: Ladies Session

By: Fiona McMahon, DPT
Hey Ladies!!! In the next installment of our Pelvic Health 101 course, we are hosting a ladies’ session to allow for a safe and non-threatening place to discuss many issues that can affect the health of your pelvic floor. This class one of Stephanie Stamas’s (the founder of PH101’s ) favorites and is definitely not to be missed. Hear more about it in her video below! Join us at 7pm on October 30th . Please register at pelvichealth101.eventbrite.com

 

Location

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY

10017

Pelvic Health 101 Flyer-jpeg

How Exercise Can Help Your Recovery From Breast Cancer

awareness cancer design pink
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Fiona McMahon PT, DPT

Have you noticed it yet? Everything is pink. Pink cups, pink pens, pink stickers, pink ribbons, pink everything. The flood of pink that happens every October and reminds us it is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. If you are someone you love has or has had breast cancer, chances are you don’t need any reminding. At Beyond Basics Physical Therapy we have spent a good deal of our blogs discussing the ins and outs of how PT can help with the symptoms following treatment for breast cancer. But what can you do right now to help your health? Emerging research is pointing to the profound importance of exercise on so many facets of well being for individuals with breast cancer. In this blog we will discuss some of the newest findings as well as practical ways to apply these findings in your own life. I hope you choose to read on and please share this with family and friends.

What the researchers are finding:

We know that to say breast cancer treatment can be hard is an understatement. The risk of symptoms like fatigue, sarcopenia (muscle loss), osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, and cognitive impairments are all elevated in individuals who are undergoing or have undergone treatment for breast cancer. These symptoms can have a profound impact on quality of life, which breast cancer survivors should not have to accept. Luckily in researching this blog, I found so many studies examining how to improve the quality of life of people going through breast cancer treatment. As a physical therapist, the studies on activity naturally piqued my interest.

Three of the studies I looked at examined how structured and monitored physical activity helped out people undergoing breast cancer treatment and those who had already undergone it. The studies included workout programs consisting of cardio, resistance training, or a combination of both. The studies showed improvements in fatigue, depression, physical fitness, and quality of life immediately following the exercise program. In one of the studies that look at how long these effects lasted, the positive benefits were lost 36 weeks after completing the exercise program.

How to use these findings:

It’s probably not groundbreaking journalism on my part to tell you that exercise is good for you. But what I do find compelling is the amount that good exercise can do, even during treatment. So the question is how to make exercise work for you. First get your doctor’s clearance for exercise, because there may be some exercises to avoid, especially if you have had a mastectomy. Most of the studies I looked at examined structured and monitored programs run by a physical therapist or other healthcare professional, which I would highly recommend especially if you are not used to exercising. A skilled physical fitness professional, like a physical therapist or Pilates instructor can not only help you progress safely through different exercises, but they can also introduce you to fun exercises you may have never thought of. That said, the best exercise is the one you will actually do. Remember, the benefits of exercise will be lost if you aren’t consistent. Cancer treatment can often feel like a full time job and adding another appointment into the mix is often not very practical. The good news is that in the study by Gokal and colleagues, walking independently for 30 minutes 5 times a week reduced self reported cognitive failures in participants. So even if you can’t make it out to see someone, there still is a lot of good you can do for yourself on your own.

Practical tips:

  1. Start slow: be kind to you body and ease yourself back into exercise. “Chunking” or breaking exercise into smaller sessions is a great way to start
  2. Spark Joy: (Shout out to Marie Kondo) but exercise should not be something you dread the thought of. If yoga, or walking makes you wanna crawl under a rock and hide, it’s not for you and that’s okay. Approach exercise curiously and you will find one you love, or at the very least, don’t hate.
  3. Buddy up: in the spirit of sparking joy, having an exercise buddy will not only help you remain accountable, it will probably make the experience a heck of a lot more fun.
  4. Get help when you need it: If you are a brand new exerciser, are in pain, or just feel like your routine is getting stale, see a fitness professional. It’s a short term investment that will pay dividends in the future by making exercise more comfortable and fun.

Keep positive, keep moving and if you have any questions, give us a call!

Dieli- Conwright C, Courneya K, Demark-Wahnefried W, et al. Aerobic and resistance exercise improves physical fitness, bone health, and quality of life in overweight and obese breast cancer survivors: a randomized controlled trial. Breast Cancer Research. 2018; 20 1:24

Gokal K, Munir F, Ahmed S, et al. Does walking protect against decline in cognitive function among breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy? Results from a small randomised controlled trial. PLOS ONE. 2018

Penttinen H, Utriainen M, Kellokumpu-Lehtinen P, et al. Effectiveness of a 12 – month Exercise Intervention on Physical Activity and Quality of Life of Breast Cancer Survivors; Five- year Results of the Brex- study. In Vivo. 2019. 33:881-888

Witlox L, Hiensch A, Velthuis M, et al. Four -year effects of exercise on fatigue and physical activity in patients with cancer. BMC Medicine. 2018; 16:86