Diet and Endometriosis

Fiona McMahon, DPT

Yellow ribbon

Yellow ribbon, Bone cancer / Osteosarcoma. Endometriosis awareness.

March is Endometriosis Awareness Month. Endometriosis is a condition that is near and dear to our hearts at Beyond Basics Physical therapy. Endometriosis is a gynecological disease that occurs when a tissue similar to the lining of the uterus implants itself outside of the uterus in the abdominal and pelvic cavity. It is an inflammatory condition, whose symptoms can vary from mild to severe. Most commonly endo is seen as causing painful periods, but it can also cause bowel and bladder symptoms, issues with fertility, pain with sexual activities and general pain. For the past two years we have done a post about endometriosis during endometriosis awareness month on how musculoskeletal pain can be a contributor or the primary cause of abdomino-pelvic pain condition. To learn more about how the disease affects the body and its symptoms as well as how we treat the condition at BBPT click here:

For this year’s Endometriosis Awareness Day I decided to review an article on how diet may or may not affect endometriosis. The full version is here for free:

http://www.rbmojournal.com/article/S1472-6483(13)00007-2/abstract

About this Article

The article by Fabio Parazzini and his colleagues is a literature review. The point of a literature review is to aggregate many studies on one topic and determine a general trend in the data in one place. A literature review is not as powerful as its cousin a meta-analysis, in which more powerful statistical tools can be applied to interpret the data. Nonetheless, literature reviews can provide us with a general sense of what is going on in a certain field of research.

First things first, let’s talk about the limitations of this review. Designing a single study on endo and diet can be rather difficult. First of all, not all endo is the same. Women with endo can experience vastly different symptoms that don’t always correspond to the amount of endometrial deposits seen on laparoscopy. It can be really difficult for researchers to ensure they have a homogeneous (or similar) study population. Secondly, studying something like diet it usually correlational and not causal. Diet can reflect a lot of other components besides the nutrients going into one’s body. Diet may reflect factors such as culture, wealth, education, geographic region, which all may play independent roles in the diagnosis and progression of endo. Most of the studies examined were based on self-report, which also may not be entirely accurate.

Now that we have the caveats out in the open, let’s talk about why a study like this is useful. Like I said before, this article is an aggregation of multiple other publications. When we see similar results produced by different authors in different groups of people, it lends a little more weight to the individual study’s findings. Most importantly Parazzini is also careful to include information on why a particular food group may be more beneficial or even harmful in the progression of endometriosis.

What the Article Found

Green Vegetables and Fruit

The authors found two studies that show that a higher intake of green fruits and vegetables reduce the risk of endometriosis. They found that the higher the intake of green fruits, specifically (think okra, etc) caused the decreased risk of endometriosis and did not find the same relationship with green vegetables (think kale, spinach, and lettuce). Parazzini notes that green vegetables and particularly fruit are high in a compound called organochlorine, which has been shown in other studies to reduce the risk of endometriosis. Organochlorines are a particularly broad class of molecules and can be found in healthy things but also make up compounds used in industrial purposes. This study is referring to those occurring naturally in vegetables and fruits.

Vitamin A

Vitamin A is found in animal products like fatty fish, dairy, and animal kidneys and livers. Its building blocks are found in green and orange vegetables and fruits and can be manufactured into vitamin A in the body. Parazzini and colleagues found mixed results some with no benefit for development of endo and some that did show benefit. No studies showed harm.

Vitamin C and E

These vitamins were not consistently found to be helpful in reducing endometriosis risk. Some studies reported that increased amounts of vitamin C and E intake reduced risk of endometriosis, while other studies failed to yield significant findings. Parazzinni did provide evidence from other studies which demonstrates the antioxidant properties of vitamins C and E. Parazinni purposes that because there may be a link between oxidative stress and disease, vitamin C and E may be helpful in reducing the inflammation associated with endometriosis.

Red Meat and Saturated Fat

Again, results were mixed. Saturated fat mainly occurs in animal products. Some studies found a correlation between red meat and endo risk, but no association with butter. In other the results were flipped.

Other items investigated

  • Soy
  • Olive Oil
  • Fish and Omega 3
  • Minimal to no evidence supporting associations between endo and dietary intake for any of these products were found.

 

What’s it All Mean?

One of my patients once told me she was instructed to finish every study, with the phrase, “more research is needed.” This is certainly the case in the field of endometriosis treatment. There’s a lot about endometriosis that we don’t understand We need well constructed studies that will allow researchers to do more powerful meta-analysis to help guide our treatment. This review was only able to include 11 studies for review out of the 256 initially found.

With all that said, I do think there are some key takeaways from this study. There was a general trend in healthier foods and more promising results. Parazinni was also diligent to include mechanisms by which these healthy foods could be helpful. Secondly, there was no harm found by eating what is considered a healthy diet, (high in greens and vitamins). These findings, although small, in combination with the general benefits of a healthy diet, should encourage patients with endo to explore in more depth how eating certain foods affects their symptoms.

At Beyond Basics we take pride in treating our patients from a holistic perspective and we appreciate that we can collaborate with other healthcare providers in our community, including expert nutritionists, naturopaths, functional medicine doctors and mental health therapists. We find that the combination of diet, specific physical therapy techniques, mental health and self-care, can significantly reduce pain and other symptoms and improve function in many patients. Our clinicians specifically are experts in manual therapy techniques such as visceral and connective tissue mobilization techniques, myofascial release and other soft tissue mobilization techniques discussed in the previously mentioned endometriosis blogs. If you are suffering from endometriosis, come visit us today.

Learn more about what we do at BBPT with our upcoming PH101 classes, which are free to the public. Here are some you may find interesting:

April 6th: Does my diet really matter?

April 13th: Pain & Sexuality: Is it all in my head? No, it is not!

April 20th: Ladies Only Session

April 27th: Optimize reproductive health

May 4th: Improve your birthing experience.

All events are at 7pm with light snacks.

Register at: pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com because space is limited!!

See full list of classes below

pelvic-health-101-spring-2017

BPPT Health Tip: Best Positioning Tips for Optimal Bowel Movements

By Sarah Paplanus, DPT, PT

Are you among the 4 million Americans who suffer from constipation? Or the 1 in 5 American adults with Irritable Bowel Syndrome? Do you occasionally experience the pain and itchy feeling associated with hemorrhoids? If so, the Squatty Potty or similar stool may be the perfect addition to your bathroom! Even if you haven’t been diagnosed with any of these conditions, it is important to note that straining or holding your breath to complete a bowel movement is never normal and is usually a sign of dysfunction. Colorectal medical conditions can vary in their cause, in their presentation and in their severity, but your pelvic floor muscles will always be affected.

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Anatomy!

 

Your colon carries waste out of your body, and where the colon meets your rectum is called your anorectal angle. This anorectal angle is an important factor in continence.

Your pelvic floor muscles work together to support the rectum, change the anorectal angle and control opening/closing. One of your pelvic floor muscles (the puborectalis) forms a sling around your rectum and works to maintain the anorectal angle. If that muscle is tight, it can essentially “choke” your rectum and contribute to straining.

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What does squatting do?

Squatting straightens the anorectal angle and helps to relax the puborectalis muscle, which helps to facilitate emptying. It also decreases the amount of pressure in the abdomen, which has been shown to decrease the time and effort needed for defecation. This all helps to reduce excessive pressure and strain on your pelvic floor muscles. In cultures where squatting is still prevalent for defecation, such as parts of Asia and Africa, it has been found that bowel movements tend to be more complete and that there is a decreased incidence of colorectal dysfunctions such as hemorrhoids, constipation and hernias.

Why is straining bad?

A principle of elementary mechanics states that “any system exposed to excessive pressures ultimately sustains injury”.These injuries can be in the form of a hemorrhoid, a hernia, a muscle strain or a chronic pelvic floor dysfunction. Straining also increases your risk of the Valsalva maneuver, which is exhaling against a closed airway. This causes a sudden increase in intra-abdominal pressure which can cause abrupt changes in blood pressure.

Toilet Posture

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Using a squatty potty, stool, or even two yoga blocks can help you assume a “squat” position. Lean forward and rest your elbows on your knees. Take deep breathes in, using your diaphragm. Place your hands on your belly and feel your breathe fill up your abdomen. Keep your mouth open and jaw relaxed!

Other Strategies to Improve Bowel Health

  • Cardiovascular exercise
  • Proper nutrition (see our previous post on fiber!)
  • Make sure you are drinking enough water
  • Relaxation training, diaphragmatic breathing

 

What to do if you are still suffering?

If the above tips are not helping defecate regularly and comfortably, you may be suffering from pelvic floor dysfunction. Pelvic floor dysfunction can occur when the muscles of the pelvic floor become too tight, weak, or both to do their job properly. Physical Therapy can help! Visit us at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy to help better your BM’s.

PH101: Something’s Wrong with my What?

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Image via PlayBuzz

On March 16, 2017 at 7pm we will be kicking off our spring semester of pelvic health education class, we call Pelvic Health 101 (PH101). In our first class we will be introducing you to the pelvic floor muscles, where they are, what they do, and how they relate to the health and function of your bowel, bladder, and sexual functioning. We will also be covering how things such as alignment, posture, muscle tone and nerves can affect your symptoms. This course is a great starting point to help you understand your pelvic floor and pelvic floor symptoms.

Please join us at our office at:

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY 10017
Register at: pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com

Here is our line up of this and future classes:

pelvic-health-101-spring-2017

March 6th is Lymphedema Awareness Day!

lymphedema

Victoria LaManna PT, DPT, CLT

March 6th is Lymphedema Awareness Day! The lymph system carries the body’s waste products, dead pathogens, and water. Eventually these substances are cleared by the body. Problems can occur if the lymph system gets blocked and cannot clear these substances. Problems with the lymphatic system can cause swelling in affected limbs, and sometimes pain, as well as fibrotic changes in the skin.

You can be born with issues in your lymph system which can cause primary lymphedema or you can have damage to your lymph system because of surgery or radiation treatments, especially for breast cancer.

If you are living with lymphedema, try these tips from the Mayo Clinic to keep your limbs as healthy as possible:

  • Avoid injections, vaccinations, blood pressure monitoring, or IV’s on the affected limb
  • Don’t wear tight fitting clothing or jewelry
  • Avoid exposure to extreme temperatures, like hot baths, or saunas
  • Monitor your affected limb for signs of infection, and go to the doctor if you suspect infection

 

You can also check out our list of Self Care Tips 

Physical therapy can help manage lymphedema, which requires a very specialized lymphedema certified therapist.  At Beyond Basics Physical Therapy, we are lucky to offer lymphedema treatment with our own Certified Lymphedema Therapist, Victoria LaManna, PT, DPT, CLT . If you are interested in starting your lymphedema treatment journey, call and make an appointment with Victoria today!

For more reading on lymphedema, check out our previous blogs:

Lymph Drainage  Therapy for Breast Health at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy

Beyond Basics’, Victoria LaManna Receives Lymphatic Drainage Therapy Certification

 

Sources
Ness S. Living with lymphedema: Take precautions, get support. 2011. Mayo Clinic. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/cancer/expert-blog/lymphedema-management/bgp-20056387. Accessed February 10, 2017

Spring Pelvic Health 101 is Coming

Fiona McMahon, DPT, PT

Pelvic Health 101 is back with some old favorites like, “Something’s wrong with my what?” and “Why is pooping so difficult?” We have also added a new course on pediatric pelvic floor issues.

If you have questions, we have answers. Join us for lectures and question and answer opportunities with expert pelvic health physical therapists, childbirth educators, and nutritionists. Please reserve your spot early at pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com. Remember spots fill up quickly. As always, light refreshments will be served.

pelvic-health-101-spring-2017

Prostatitis What it is and What to do About it

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Fiona McMahon DPT

Introduction

Prostatitis is a common diagnosis we see at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy. If I have a new evaluation on my schedule, who is male and between the ages of 18-40, we can place a pretty good bet that they are coming to see me for issues pertaining to non-bacterial prostatitis. It is estimated that 35-50% of men are reported to have prostatitis symptoms  in their lifetime (Rees). Prostatitis can be classified into different types based on their causes and response to treatment. Prostatitis is a vexing condition for many patients. In cases of non-bacterial prostatitis, which makes up 95% of all prostatitis, it’s often very difficult to determine what brought it on, and often times our patients have been bouncing from practitioner to practitioner trying to find answers and effective treatment. Let’s dive into the causes, symptoms, and treatment in order to help shed light on this condition.

 

Prostatitis Symptoms,

Although there are different types of prostatitis, the symptoms of prostatitis are mostly the same between types. That isn’t to suggest that every man with prostatitis experiences the same symptoms, quite on the contrary. Men with prostatitis may experience almost all of the symptoms listed below or they may only notice one or two. This melange of symptom possibilities can add to the confusion of having prostatitis and getting down to an effective cure.

 

Symptoms:

  • The sensation of having a golf ball stuck in the rectum
  • Hesitant urinary stream (having trouble getting the urine to start flowing)
  • Post void dribble (spotting of urine on underwear following voiding)
  • Pain that radiates into the abdomen (this is one of the differences from symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia)
  • Erectile dysfunction and decreased libido
  • Painful ejaculation
  • Painful or burning urination
  • Genital pain: penile, testicular, groin and perineal pain

 

Types of prostatitis:

Here’s where it gets a little more complicated. There isn’t one type of prostatitis. There are four. Each type of prostatitis is a little different in terms of etiology (how it developed) and how it’s treated.

Type 1: Acute bacterial prostatitis

This type of prostatitis is caused by an infection by a microbe. It is relatively rare. In addition to the symptoms above, a person with this type of prostatitis will feel the symptoms of an ongoing infection, including pain in the body, fever, and chills. This type of prostatitis generally response well to antibiotic treatment.

Type 2: Chronic bacterial prostatitis

Chronic bacterial prostatitis can occur after multiple infection or when there is an ongoing low grade infection. The symptoms, particularly those of infection are dampened in this form of prostatitis than those of type 1. Type 2 is often more tricky to treat and may require multiple courses of antibiotics

Type 3: Chronic Prostatitis/ Chronic pelvic pain syndrome (the most common making up 90-95% of all prostatitis and WHAT WE TREAT!)

This type of prostatitis occurs with no evident infectious cause and makes up the majority of cases. This is the classification that is one of the more frustrating for patients to deal with because the causal agent is much harder to ascertain; however the majority have musculoskeletal dysfunction, which we now know can be treated effectively through expert pelvic floor physical therapy.  Type III prostatitis can be further categorized based on the presence or absence of white blood cells in the urine or prostatic fluid, inflammatory and noninflammatory respectively.

Type 4: Asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis

As the name implies, this type of prostatitis is usually not noticed unless semen or urine analysis is being performed to diagnose another condition. Typically this type is left untreated.

 

Causes

Here’s one of the universal questions that patients with prostatitis have: “why do I have this?”  Sometimes patients may find themselves blaming their prostatitis on something they have done in the past, like masturbating or poor hygiene habits as children. The fact is, prostatitis can occur for a multitude of reasons, and it’s usually something one has no control over like a fall on the bottom or an infection. It’s unfortunately something that happens, and as noted in the introduction of this blog, it is quite common. Here are some possible causes:

 

  • In chronic nonbacterial prostatitis/ chronic pelvic pain syndrome 90-95% of cases- no definitive cause ( or very difficult to ascertain); however pelvic floor dysfunction is a prevalent contributor.  
  • Bacterial infection, which can have good results with antibiotics
  • Chronic bacterial prostatitis, recurrent infection
  • Inflammation to the pelvic area
  • Central and peripheral sensitization- meaning a past injury in the area caused your pelvic nerves to perceive non painful stimuli as painful
  • Trigger points (irritable points of muscle) in the pelvic floor and abdomen

 

Treatment

Treatment is evolving in prostatitis. Increasing evidence supports a multimodal approach to treating prostatitis and its symptoms, meaning that not only is medical intervention used, but psychological, nutritional, and physical therapy.

From a medical perspective the first line of treatment for prostatitis is the “3 A’s”, antibiotics (especially the quinolone class), anti-inflammatories, and alpha blockers. Antibiotics obviously clear up any infection that might be causing your symptoms, anti-inflammatories to bring down the pain and discomfort, and alpha blockers to improve urine flow. Sometimes this is just what the doctor ordered (literally), especially in individuals with type 1 prostatitis and they are on their way with no further treatment needed. Since the vast majority of people with chronic prostatitis fall outside of the type one category and into more difficult to treat types, their recovery may require a more involved intervention to effectively treat their symptoms and the 3 A’s may not be the answer, or the complete answer for these patients.

 

Physical Therapy: Anderson and his colleagues described the relationship between the presence of myofascial trigger points and symptomatic prostatitis. They also showed that physical therapy intervention, including manual release of these trigger points was effective in reducing symptoms of prostatitis. The benefit of physical therapy was shown again to be more effective than placebo in a 2011 paper by Nickel. In addition to treating the trigger points themselves, PT’s work to determine what lead up to the formation of the trigger points in the first place, whether that be poor habitual posture, poor strength, or tight muscles in other parts of the body. They also teach patients how to avoid clenching their pelvic floor to prevent exacerbating symptoms.  This type of therapeutic approach was found to be effective in reducing pain in 72% of participants in a study conducted by Anderson and colleagues in 2005. The therapists at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy work to go beyond simple treatment of the trigger points themselves.  We develop plans and treatments to prevent their recurrence in the future.   Some other effective physical therapy techniques that we use include but are not limited to, joint mobilization to assist proper structural alignment, therapeutic exercise, postural and neuromuscular re-education and a detailed and individualized home exercise program.

 

Dietary Modifications:

Avoiding irritants to the bladder and gastrointestinal system is another simple and effective place to start. In some men, avoiding spicy foods, alcohol and caffeine can work wonders in making symptoms more manageable.   

 

Phytotherapy:

Preliminary data shows that there is evidence to support the use of saw palmetto, quercetin and bee pollen extract in reducing the pain of prostatitis. If supplementation interests you, consult with your general practitioner or urologist.

 

Stress Reduction

As clinicians who have seen a lot of cases of prostatitis, high stress is a contributor that we see with the vast majority of our patients. Studies have shown that high levels of stress are correlated with higher pain and disability scores in individuals with prostatitis. Stress can also perpetuate unhealthy holding or clenching in the pelvic floor, which causes or contributes to trigger points discussed earlier in this section. Stress reduction is a key component to expediting your recovery and is something we recommend to nearly all of our patients.

 

Final Thoughts

  • Prostatitis is a common and aggravating condition to be living with, and the fact is, every case of prostatitis is different. You may fall into the category were a course of antibiotics does the trick or you may fall into the category where you require physical therapy alongside medical intervention which can be much more slow going. Regardless of where you fall, be patient, there usually is a lot that can be done to help the more complex cases of prostatitis clear up. If you are suffering with this condition, make an appointment with an expert pelvic floor physical therapist today. There is so much we can do.

 

Sources

Anderson R, Sawyer T, Wise D. Painful myofascial trigger points and pain site in men with chronic prostatitis/ Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome. J Urol. 2009;182(6): 2753-8

Anderson R, Wise D, Sawyer T. Integration of myofascial trigger point release and paradoxical relaxation training treatment of chronic pelvic pain in men. J Urol. 2005;174(1):155-60

Chronic nonbacterial prostatitis (chronic pelvic pain syndrome). Harvard Health Publications. Harvard Medical School. 2007. http://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletter_article/chronic-nonbacterial-prostatitis-chronic-pelvic-pain-syndrome. Accessed December 11, 2016

Duclos A, Lee C, Shoskes D. Current treatment options in the management of chronic prostatitis. Ther Clin Risk Manag. 2007; 3(4):507-12

 

Rees J, Abrahams M, Doble A et al. Diagnosis and treatment of chronic bacterial prostatitis and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: a consensus guideline. BJU Int. 2015; 116(4):509-25

 

Nickel J. Prostatitis. Can Urol Assoc J. 2011; 5(5): 306-15

BBPT Health Tip: Seated Hamstring Stretch

Fiona McMahon DPT, PT

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Fenitra Fuchs, of BBPT shows the correct way to perform this stretch. Notice how she doesn’t curve her back forward in order to perform the stretch

Seated Hamstrings Stretch

Hello folks! Beyond Basics Physical Therapy’s latest health tip is the seated hamstrings stretch!

Why seated you ask? In selecting this stretch over other hamstrings stretches, I wanted to pick something that most everyone can be able to do. This stretch is particularly beneficial for those of you who have difficulty getting on and off the floor. Although if you do have difficulty getting off of the floor, it is important to go to physical therapy and get the training to do so, as being able to independently get up off the floor is imperative for maintaining independent function as you age.  Another point: if you have any sciatic pain or sitting pain, please seek a physical therapist before attempting this stretch.  

Muscles involved: Hamstrings, gastroc soleus complex ( your calf) and to some extent your sciatic nerve

Stretch Type: Static: Best if performed after workouts on warm muscles. Exercise caution if stretching cold muscle, because unwarned muscle doesn’t stretch as well as warmed up muscles.  

Caution: It is possible to overdo it. Stop the stretch or ease up if you feel tingling in your legs or pain in your low back.

As always: No stretch should ever be painful. If a stretch is painful, stop and consult your physical therapist for modifications.  

 

Directions:  Sitting in a sturdy chair, ( don’t do this on a rolly stool or office chair, please!). Straighten knee of leg to be stretched and point toes up. Lean forward at the hips until you feel a gentle stretch in the back of your leg. Don’t round your back. Keep in mind, for those of us with tight hamstrings, you will feel the stretch without too much of a forward bend.  So take it slow!

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Fenitra demonstrates a straight knee and pointed toe while performing her stretch

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Fenitra demonstrates this stretch