Preparing for the Marathon with Physical Therapy at Beyond Basics!

JHO-Muscogee Moms Contest-Blog

Fiona McMahon, DPT

Hi all! If you have been following our blog, you should be aware that Beyond Basics Physical Therapy and I are teaming up to raise money the Tisch Multiple Sclerosis Research Center of New York with Team Tisch MS. I’m hoping to raise $3,000 dollars to support multiple sclerosis research.  We have currently raised approximately $1,500!. Please support us and click HERE to donate. What puts the fun in this fundraiser ( sorry, not sorry about the pun) is that we get to get donations through running the New York Marathon, which I will be running in November.

I have run 4 marathons before including New York, and even though my timed goals were not lofty ( I really only cared about dragging my body from A to B 26.2 miles later), I relied on PT every single time, to keep my body whole and prevent me from sustaining race ending injuries. This year is no different and this week I will be having my first appointment with Jessica Babich, at Beyond Basics.

 

Why go to Physical Therapy if you are not injured?

No matter how you cut it, physical therapy is an investment. Based on your insurance, co-pays can vary to very little to more expensive, and no matter how much you are paying, the time it takes to go to physical therapy and diligently do your exercises is a finite resource. So why add more tasks to an already arduous training schedule? For me, the answer is easy, I want my body to not only run a faster marathon this fall, but I want to do so in a health way to protect my joints, ligaments and muscles, so I can not only continue to run, hike, ski, and play outside, but also so I can continue working without pain.

But aren’t you a PT, can’t you just PT yourself?

One of the most powerful and surprising lessons I’ve learned through being a physical therapist is, it is really hard to be objective about your own body. Physical therapists are trained to see large scale impairments like weak hip strength, which I know for a fact is something I need to work on, but also small scale impairments in movement, like slightly more pronation on the right foot than the left, those are things another practitioner needs to observe from the outside to diagnose and treat. Having an objective movement analyst ( aka a physical therapist), can help you see weaknesses, and alignment issues that even the most expert observer may miss on themselves. Long story short, you don’t know what you don’t know.

Why someplace like Beyond Basics Physical Therapy

I work at Beyond Basics, so full disclosure, it is the most convenient place I could go. That being said, it is also the best place I could go. Physical therapy clinics come in “flavors” and for someone hoping to truly optimize their performance, Beyond Basics Physical therapy and clinics with the same “flavor” are where to go. What makes Beyond Basics physical therapy so special is the hour one-on-one treatment they offer. This allows us to address all three pillars of movement, efficiently, effectively, and completely. The three pillars are mechanical, ( tightness, or lack thereof, of muscles, joints, fascia and ligaments as well as bony alignment), strength (how strong is a particular muscle and is it strong enough to do it’s job), and finally neuromuscular control, ( do your muscles do the right thing at the right time, this is really important to stabilize the joints of the leg and back, and is often overlooked in some busier physical therapy practice). Other physical therapy practices have a slightly different flavor. They may have a one physical therapist treating 4 patients and hour. Even if time is divided up perfectly equitably between patients, this allows the therapist of only 15 minutes on hands-on treatment to correct mechanical and neuromuscular issues, therefore leaving 75% of the time doing exercises with other patients. That flavor of physical therapy can work for some people, especially those who like to socialize with other patients during treatment, but for me, marathon training is too hard to only get 15 minutes of hands on time and spend 45 minutes doing exercises in a crowded gym. I feel that I am perfectly capable of doing my assigned exercises regularly as part of my home program. I would much prefer to work with a therapist who can tailor my treatment to suit my needs, not one who has to juggle the time constraints of treating multiple patients at once.

How are you preparing for PT?

Beyond Basics Physical Therapy is based out of New York. Like most states in the USA, New York has direct access, so I don’t need to have a prescription to come in. I will be bringing a few things to my appointment that I think are essential: health history, attire, and attitude.

Health History: Health history is a big one. In physical therapy a complete health history includes your current medications, and medical conditions, past injuries ( this is really important, and things like an ankle sprain a few years ago can clue us in on a lot ), and other factors like stress, amount of sleep you typically get, how much you work out and what you do, and diet.

Attire: Another important and sometimes overlooked item on the list. Your physical therapist will have to examine different areas on your body, as well as have access to treat those areas. Loose fitting shorts and an athletic top are a good bet. Even if you are going to physical therapy, for a condition like pelvic floor dysfunction, your therapist may ask you to do exercises, so it wise to bring workout clothes to your appointment. If you are a runner, bring in your shoes. The wear pattern on used pair of running shoes can provide heaps of valuable information.

Attitude: This is super important. Physical therapy is a partnership between you and your physical therapist. For me I already, foresee finding time to do the exercises that Jessica will prescribe to be a challenge. But the fact is, home exercise is part of the deal, and I won’t get nearly as much benefit from physical therapy alone, versus physical therapy with home exercise. Like I said before marathon training is simply too hard to just go through the motions at physical therapy.

 

What are your goals and what do you expect to gain from physical therapy?

Like I said before, I want to stay as healthy for as long as possible, but I would be lying if I said my primary goal wasn’t to increase my time. I want to put my money where my mouth is and put all my old times out in the open. So you can know where I am starting from and where I hope to go.

Here are my past times:

Mount Desert Island 2010: total time 3h 56 minutes 18 second: 9 min per mile pace

Mount Desert Island 2011: total time 4h 05 minutes 21 second: 9 min 22 seconds per mile pace

Sugarloaf 2011: total time 3h 52 minutes 25 second: 8 min 51 seconds per mile pace

New York City 2013: total time 3h 52 minutes 25 second: 8 min 51 seconds per mile pace

Here’s my dream goal for this race:

3 hours and 45 minute at 8: 35 pace.

As you can see, it’s 7 whole minutes faster than my fastest race over 7 years ago . To get there, I can’t get injured and I certainly can’t waste any precious energy during the race running inefficiently. I know that Beyond Basics will give me the best chance to meet my goals.

If you are looking to increase your performance in your sport of choice come see us to make sure you are getting the most power out of your serve, swing, or stride. Click here to access our home page and make an appointment today.

Continue to follow us here, on Instagram, and on Facebook to see my progress in physical therapy as well as my progress towards my goal of raising $3,000 dollars for MS research. If you care to donate please click here to donate to this worthy cause

Myself, Beyond Basics Physical Therapy join Team Tisch MS for the New York City Marathon

Hello guys! What’s happening?

running picture

I just signed up for my 5th marathon, and second New York City Marathon, but this year it’s a little different. This year I am running on behalf of Beyond Basics Physical therapy to raise money for Team Tisch MS. Team Tisch MS is a charity team dedicated to raising money to support the Tisch Multiple Sclerosis Research Center of New York (Tisch MSRCNY). Team Tisch is dedicated to the goal of having “a future without MS”. Tisch MSRCNY has broken new ground in clinical research of multiple (MS) treatment and is now conducting a FDA- Approved Phase II Stem Cell Trial that has shown reversal of disability in MS patients. Now is the time to donate. It is so important to generate funding to keep momentum on this crucial work.

Over the course of training, I will be providing you with updates on my progress, tips and tricks for becoming and remaining your best runner, as well as discussions on how the work we do at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy can help patients with MS live more functional lives. You can check out my long form blogs here on wordpress to see updates and photos of my day to day running adventures.

My reason for wanting to be support Tisch MSRNY is personal. When I was in highschool, my mother died of a degenerative disease that stripped her of her independence and function in a way similar that MS affects people who suffer with it. Shortly after I graduated college, I got a job at a research lab in hopes to eventually become a research scientist to fight diseases that rob individuals of their ability to do the things they love. During that time I began running marathons, and shortly thereafter injured my knee, (I wasn’t a physical therapist yet, and was too silly to give a hoot about stretching) . The injury was severe enough that I had difficulty managing the short walk between the produce section and the dairy case. I went to physical therapy and as my abilities slowly began to return, I thought of my mother in her final months. The reason why those months remained sweet and rewarding for her was because she had had a physical therapist who taught her how to manage with a cane, how to efficiently get out of a chair, and how to conserve her energy so she could continue to treat her patients and support her kids in our numerous extracurricular activities. This marked the point in my life that I realized my passions and talents would be most useful in the pursuit of reducing morbidity ( negative impact on quality of life) in patients suffering from injury and disease. Although I have shifted to the clinical side of management for injury and disease, I remain keenly invested in the eradication of degenerative and disabling disease. I would love to see a day in my lifetime where my job is reduced to treating musculoskeletal injuries, because groups like Tisch MSRNY have done the research to get rid of degenerative and disabling disease conditions.

Now is the time to donate. We are so close to getting somewhere. I liken it to mile 20 of a marathon’s 26.2 miles. I have a request. My 30th birthday is in June. I would love to receive at least 30 donations of at least 30 dollars by the end of June. Please donate here today, not tomorrow, but today, right now. Amy Stein and Beyond Basics Physical Therapy said they would match my 30 for $30 donations on my birthday!!

Thanks and stay tuned for all sorts of fun running and fundraising stuff coming soon.

Click here to donate!

Check out updates on the Beyond Basics Instagram 

 

Without Happy Ankles and Feet, We Don’t Have a Leg to Stand On!

foot

By, Amy Stein, DPT and Fiona McMahon, DPT

Our ankles function to help us do simple tasks from walking down the hall, climbing stairs to advanced tasks like cutting during a high level soccer game. Ankles need two things to do their job well. They need stability to allow us to transfer our weight onto them and mobility to absorb forces, like little shock absorbers when we move. A deficit in either one of these area’s can affect our ability to efficiently do certain activities and may cause pain in the foot and ankle itself or further up the leg.   As physical therapists we evaluate and treat ankle and foot issues to get the athlete or non-athlete back to optimal function.  

Get this, the foot has 26 bones, 33 joints and 100 muscles in it. There is a lot to look at and unfortunately, a lot that can go wrong with the foot. As physical therapists and especially here at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy, we like to use a systematic approach when evaluating the foot and ankle. We look at the foot’s range of motion (how far it can move), its strength, it’s ability to move well (motor control), and whether or not something’s not moving well when it comes to the soft tissue or the joint of the foot. If something’s up with any of these categories we open our tool box and treat using functional manual therapy, neuromuscular and postural re-education and self care!

Things we look at

  • In standing we assess the patient’s baby squat ( or plié, as our former dancers would call it) we are looking to see if there is an issue with the tissue of the foot’s ability to stretch and fold
  • Heel raise: We look at our patient’s’ ability to go up on their toes, aberrant or weird motions tell us about motor control, strength, and joint mobility.
  • Arm Swing: We promise this isn’t to make our patients look silly. It allows us to assess pronation and supination, which are super important motions of the foot.
  • End feel: We will passively move the patient’s foot and ankle through its range of motion to assess how the joint feels. It can tell us a lot about what’s wrong and where it’s coming from.
  • Palpation: We pride ourselves on our hands at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy. One of our PT’s calls it our “brain hands”. Palpation can reveal a ton about what’s going on in the foot.

These are all pretty basic first steps when assessing our patients. They are the starting point, but by no means the finish line. Once we get the big picture we will refine our examination to see what’s going on when our patients are doing their specific sport or activity. Once we get a good handle on  what’s going on we select the most appropriate techniques for our patients. Each patient is different and one basic protocol for everyone isn’t how we roll at BBPT. If you think your ankles or feet could use a little extra TLC, book an appointment today. To get the ball rolling, check out our blog written by our therapist, Denise Small . 

Exercise, The Female Athlete, and the Pelvic Floor

active-image

Fiona McMahon PT, DPT

In honor of National Women’s Health and Fitness Day ,September  28, we are exploring the benefits of regular exercise for women as well as addressing some pitfalls (pelvic floor included), that female athletes can fall into too. It is far too often that women find themselves sidelined from their favorite sports and fitness routines secondary to issues like orthopedic or sports-related pain or incontinence. Although all the issues outlined in this blog can occur to both genders, many of these conditions are more likely to happen to females, secondary to their pelvic structure and physiology.

 

Exercise and Its Benefits

heart-health

 

The benefits of exercise are too numerous to discuss every single one here and span the physical to the emotional. There are a number of conditions that have profound effects on the health of women nationwide. Let’s explore some of exercise’s specific benefits for these conditions together.

Heart Disease

According to the American Heart Association, Heart disease is the number one killer of women in the US and is responsible for 1 in 3 female deaths.  Exercise and a healthy lifestyle have been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease by 80%. The American Heart Association recommends 150 minutes of moderate activity or 75 minutes of vigorous activity to stave off heart disease.

Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is unfortunately a common affliction among white and asian urban dwelling females.  It is characterized by reduced bone density, which causes bones to be fragile and increases the risk of fracture in individuals that have osteoporosis. Exercise has been shown to be helpful in both reducing the risk of osteoporosis as well as improving the bone mineral density of those who already have osteoporosis.

Other benefits of regular exercise include:

  • Reduced risk of diabetes
  • Reduced risk of colon cancer
  • Improved psychological well being
  • Maintenance of healthy body weight

Remember, it is important to consult with a trained healthcare professional before commencing a new fitness routine.

 

The Female Athlete Triad- Aka the Downside

All things in moderation. Although exercise is beneficial it is easy to over do it. It becomes easier to slip into an unhealthy relationship with exercise, especially in women who are training at elite levels, have eating disorders, or body dysmorphia issues.

The  female athlete triad consists of three disorders that can have severe health consequences in both the near and long term. The three disorders that compose the female athlete triad are:femaletriad

  1. Disordered Eating
  2. Ammenorrhea (absent periods or periods that are irregular)
  3. Osteoporosis

The female athlete triad is often attributed to the expectation that women keep a slender appearance. Girls and women who have body image issues may be at greater risk. The female athlete triad is dangerous and has the potential to be deadly. Osteoporosis can result  in fractures and eating disorders can seriously impact fertility, or even throw off the delicate balance of electrolytes in their system, putting them at serious risk for a cardiac event.

Warning signs of the female athlete triad include:

  • Yellowing of skin
  • Stress fractures
  • Rapid fluctuations in weight
  • Development of baby hair over skin
  • Daily vigorous exercise to an excessive level

 

The female athlete triad requires a multidisciplinary approach from medical, to psychological to nutrition.  It is important for someone who is suffering from the female athlete triad to seek help in order to safeguard their health and emotional well being.

 

Athletics and The Pelvic Floor

d14e2-tipsforahappyandhealthyvaginaLike any muscle, the pelvic floor can get fatigued, strained, or even go into a painful muscle spasm. The thing about the pelvic floor muscles, is that they have to work in almost every athletic pursuit. They work in partnership with the multifidus of the back, the transverse abdominus of the belly, and the diaphragm to stabilize and protect your spine. They also contract with every step during running activities to prevent your pelvic organs from dropping down in your pelvic cavity and to prevent urinary and or fecal leakage. Things can go wrong when the pelvic floor or other core muscles don’t function properly. Athletes’ pelvic floors can become tight and restricted, preventing closure of sphincters and support of pelvic organs. They may go into spasm from working too hard to stabilize the spine, if one of the other core muscles is failing to pull its weight.

Recently there has been more work to investigate the link between athletes and pelvic floor dysfunction. A recent study found that self identified female triathletes suffer from urinary and fecal incontinence at rates as high as 37.4% and 28.0%, respectively. Similar results were also found on a group of runners. Of the triathletes studied, nearly a quarter of them fit the criteria for female athlete triad, discussed earlier in this post.

Does this mean you have to give up your penchant for running? NO! (hellooooooo the author of this post is a runner), but if you find yourself experiencing incontinence, pain, constipation, and or painful sex, something is wrong and you must intervene in order to protect your long term health and your ability to participate in your favorite sport. At Beyond Basics Physical Therapy we combine orthopedic and pelvic expertise to help return athletes to their sports in a more functional and less painful condition. We relax tight muscles of the pelvic floor, train the core, including the pelvic floor if needed, to do its fair share, and return normal postural and structural alignment to our patients. We work one on one with you to develop a home exercise plan to help you reach your goals and prevent a reoccurrence of your pelvic floor or core disorder.

 

Please come see us so you can return to your sport in a better and more optimal condition than when you started: http://www.beyondbasicsphysicaltherapy.com/

 

 

Sources

American College of Sports Medicine. Information on … the female athlete triad. https://www.acsm.org/docs/brochures/the-female-athlete-triad.pdf. Accessed September 19, 2016

 

American Heart Association. Facts About Heart Disease in Women.  2016. https://www.goredforwomen.org/home/about-heart-disease-in-women/facts-about-heart-disease/. Accessed: September 6, 2016

 

Bø, K. Urinary incontinence, pelvic floor dysfunction, exercise and sport. Sports Medicine, 34(7), 451-464. 2004.

 

Illinois Department of Public Health: Women’s Health. Facts about  women’s wellness exercise . http://www.idph.state.il.us/about/womenshealth/factsheets/exer.htm Accessed: September 13 2016

 

Loyola University Health System. “Female triathletes at higher risk for pelvic floor disorders.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 August 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/08/160823165743.htm>.

 

Stampfer M, Hu F, Manson J, et al. Primary prevention of coronary heart disease in women through diet and lifestyle. The New England Journal of Medicine. 2000; 343(1). 16- 22
Todd J, Robinson R. Osteoporosis and exercise. Postgrad Med J. 2003; 79:320-23

Beyond Basics’s Pro-Bono Clinic for PT Day of Service!

201510_blog_globalptdayofservice

Victoria LaManna, DPT

October is around the corner! And a busy month for many. Whether you are getting back into the swing of school or work after summer vacation, preparing your Halloween costume or getting ready for all the upcoming holidays right around the corner – there is a lot going on!
This time of year is also an opportunity to do good and give back. October is National Physical Therapy Month, where physical therapists celebrate their amazing field of healing and getting people back to optimal function. In addition, many of the PT’s throughout the U.S. give back to their communities during this month. This year we are taking it up a notch. Physical therapists WORLDWIDE are getting involved for the second annual Global PT Day of Service Saturday, October 15th. Whether it is by hosting a pro-bono clinic, serving in a soup kitchen, participating in a 5k for a cause, or cleaning up a community garden – physical therapists globally as a profession are coming together to make a positive impact on the world around them.
At Beyond Basics, we have decided to host a pro-bono clinic Saturday, October 1st to give back to those in the New York City area who may not have insurance or access to physical therapy. We are providing 30 minute one-on-one evaluations and recommendations for home programs to up to 30 participants. For more information and to sign up please visit: http://signup.com/go/Nu1T4Q
You can also check out PT Day of Service here and follow on twitter (#PTDOS) to see how the day unfolds! http://ptdayofservice.com/
The American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) is also involved in hosting National Physical Therapy Month. This year the APTA’s focus is on it’s national public awareness campaign, #ChoosePT. This campaign lets consumers know about the risks of opioid use and that physical therapy is a safe, non-opioid alternative for managing pain.
I encourage you to check out educational resources provided by the APTA (www.apta.org) and Move Forward PT (http://www.moveforwardpt.com/Default.aspx). Learn all about how physical therapy can help you overcome pain without the use of opiods, improve mobility and maintain independence throughout your lifetime.

day-of-service

BBPT Health Tips: Quadriceps Stretch

Quadriceps Stretch

 

Hello folks! Beyond Basics Physical Therapy’s latest health tip is the quadriceps stretch!

IMG_3827
Victoria LaManna, DPT, PT, CLT at Beyond Basics

Muscles involved: The quadriceps. The quadriceps are a muscle group that has four separate muscle heads, (quads (four), ceps (heads), get it?). If you walk, you put these guys to work everyday. They work to extend (straighten) the knee and one of the heads, (the rectus femoris) works to flex (bend) the hip.

Stretch Type: Static: Best if performed after workouts on warm muscles. Exercise caution if stretching cold (unwarmed up) muscle.

Caution: This stretch is not advisable for those with balance issues

As always: No stretch should ever be painful. If a stretch is painful, stop and consult your physical therapist for modification.

Directions:  Standing with support in front of you if you need support. Bend your knee and hold your leg at the ankle. Be careful not to abduct your leg (or let your knee move laterally away from the body).   Hold this pose for 30 seconds to a minute on each leg and repeat.

Learn more about Victoria here!

Welcome to Beyond Basics Physical Therapy’s monthly “Tip from your Physical Therapist!”

Fiona McMahon, DPT

We are rolling out a new tip monthly to help you increase your fitness and general health. Today we will be going over a stretch. Before we get started, let’s go over some basics.

The most common question I get asked when I give people a stretch to do is, “ should I do this stretch before or after I work out?” My answer usually is, whenever you are most likely to remember to do it. The best stretch or exercise is one you actually do”. I then go on to explain that you get a little more bang for your buck if you do it after exercise. In a Cochrane review, researchers show that stretching before exercise typically reduces delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) by ½ point on a 100 point scale and stretching afterwards reduced muscle soreness by 1 point on a 100 point scale.

Reading that last paragraph, you probably thought, “small potatoes, Fiona, 1 point is not worth disrupting my routine for”. But stretching has many other benefits. The Mayo Clinic Reports that regular stretching has been shown to improve athletic performance, improve blood flow to the muscle, and reduce risk of injuries. Do I have your attention yet?

Let’s introduce July’s stretch:

Adductor Stretch

Adductor Stretch- melissa Stendahl
Staff Physical Therapist, Melissa Stendahl demonstrates

Muscles involved: The adductors, or inner thigh muscles. These muscles primarily serve the function to bring your legs together and are commonly involved in “groin tears”

Stretch Type: Static: Best if performed after workouts on warm muscles. Exercise caution if stretching cold ( unwarmed up) muscle.

As always: No stretch should ever be painful. If a stretch is painful, stop and consult your physical therapist for modification.

Directions: Hold this pose for 30 seconds to a minute; repeat. You may increase the intensity of this stretch, by hinging at the hips and bringing your torso forward over your legs. Remember, to keep your back straight and that this should be a gentle stretch and should not be painful.

Learn more about Melissa Stendahl here!

Sources:

 

Herbert R, de Noronha M, Kamper S. Stretching to prevent or reduce muscle soreness after exercise. Cochrane Review.  2011.
Mayo Clinic Staff. Stretching: Focus on Flexibility. Mayo Clinic. 2014. http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/fitness/in-depth/stretching/art-20047931?pg=1. [Accessed: July 23,2016}