Ph101 Men’s Only Seminar

Fiona McMahon PT, DPT

On October 23rd at 7pm we will be hosting our  “Men’s Only Seminar”. Join us as we discuss how pelvic floor dysfunction affects the male pelvic floor. Learn how your sex life can be improved by pelvic floor treatment, how to regain function after prostatectomy, and how to rid yourself of the pain of prostatitis, and avoid antibiotics for the most common type of prostatitis. This seminar is not to be missed!

For more reading on male pelvic health topics, check out:

All About Testicles

Navigating Life with Chronic Pain: Part 1

Navigating Life with Chronic Pain: Part II

Prostatitis What it is and What to do About it

Location:

110 East 42nd Street

Suite 1504

NY NY

10017

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PH101: Pain and Sexuality: is it all in my head?

 

By Fiona McMahon, DPT

Sex should feel good… really, really good. But when it doesn’t, you may start to wonder, what’s wrong with me? Am I broken? Am I a prude? Am I frigid? Painful sex isn’t something we talk about. No one would look at you twice if were complaining of pain in your elbow, but in your genitals is a different story.

On October 16th at 7pm, we at Beyond Basics are breaking down those taboos and having an educational seminar, followed by an optional question and answer session at the end. We will discuss the many causes of sexual pain and how physical therapy can help.  The event will be hosted by one of our expert therapists, Stephanie Stamas. Stephanie will give a detailed seminar about pelvic health and take time to clear up some common misconceptions many people have concerning their bodies and sexual function.

Please join us at our office at:

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY 10017
Register at: pelvichealth101.eventbrite.com

Here is our line up of this and future classes

 

Pelvic Health 101 Flyer-jpeg

 

 

PH101: Does My Diet Really Matter?

Fiona McMahon, DPT

Gluten free, soy free, low FODMAP. It’s amazing how many diets there are out there that really can  provide people with symptom relief. If you are suffering with chronic pain you may be confused on where to start, or what is right for you. You also may have tried out a bunch of different ways of eating, not seen results and have gotten really frustrated. If this is the case for you, I highly encourage you to come to our next pelvic health seminar on October 9th at 7pm, “Does my diet really matter”.

jessica-drummond-headshot-197x300This seminar will be hosted by a special guest speaker, nutritionist Jessica Drummond. Jessica Drummond is a former pelvic floor physical therapist who now specializes in nutrition for those suffering with pelvic floor dysfunction. This seminar was a hit last year and is a great starting point for those considering adding nutrition as part of their healing journey.

Register at pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com  today.

 

 

Location

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY

10017

Pelvic Health 101 Flyer-jpeg

Mama’s 101: Recovering After Birth

On September 26th at 1 pm scoop up your baby and join us for our FREE educational seminar hosted by Dr. Joanna Hess as she provides the inside scoop on how to get back to leak free, bulge free movement.

Address:

Beyond Basics Physical Therapy – Downtown

156 William Street

Suite 800

New York, NY 10038

Date:

September 26th at 1 pm

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Pelvic Health 101 is back! Come to Our First Class on September 18th

 

On September 18th, at 7pm we will be kicking off our fall semester of pelvic health education class, we call Pelvic Health 101 (PH101). In our first class we will be introducing you to the pelvic floor muscles, where they are, what they do, and how they relate to the health and function of your bowel, bladder, and sexual functioning. We will also be covering how things such as alignment, posture, muscle tone and nerves can affect your symptoms. This course is a great starting point to help you understand your pelvic floor and pelvic floor symptoms.

Please join us at our office at:

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY 10017
Register at: pelvichealth101.eventbrite.com

Here is our line up of this and future classes

Pelvic Health 101 Flyer-jpeg

 

Back to school: A to Z with No problem with Pee!

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Fiona McMahon PT, DPT

It’s back to school time! Many of us look back at this time fondly. Reminiscing about the joy of picking out new notebooks, meeting new friends, and trying to put together a perfect back to school look (any 90’s kids remember the Delia*s catalog?) But if you are a kid or a parent dealing with a kid with urinary accidents, the idea of going back to school can be downright terrifying. In this blog, we will go through the causes of urinary incontinence as well as treatments. Here’s the thing, if you only have time to just skim this blog, I want you to know this: Urinary accidents are not your fault, nor your child’s and there are solutions out there to help improve accidents. So keep your and your kiddo’s heads up. It can get better.

In the spirit of back to school, we will start off this blog with some definitions. We can classify bladder accidents in many different ways, which can be helpful when it comes to selecting a course of treatment. Here are ways the medical community may classify your child’s incontinence

Intermittent versus Continuous: Intermittent applies to children who are having discrete individual episodes of incontinence, rather than continuous loss of urine from the bladder. The latter is more suggestive of neurological or anatomical impairment and does require a physician’s attention right away.

Intermittent incontinence can be further classified as primary or secondary. Primary incontinence occurs in children over 5 who have never achieved continence, whereas secondary incontinence occurs in kiddos who have had continence previously for a period of 6 months or more.

Urge Incontinence: Occurs when when a child has a sudden urge to urinate and cannot make it to the potty in time. It is a type of intermittent incontinence.

Stress Incontinence: Occurs when kiddos lose continence with activities like coughing, laughing, and sneezing. It is a type of intermittent incontinence.

Eneuresis or Nighttime Incontinence as the name would imply, this is intermittent urinary incontinence that occurs at night.

So here’s the thing, your child may experience just one type of incontinence or they may experience many types, (i.e. urge, stress, and bedwetting). Regardless of the type of incontinence your child is experiencing, they are not alone. Bedwetting is experienced in nearly 5%-10% of 7 year olds and daytime incontinence is experienced by 5-15 percent of kiddos between 5- 9 years old. It can be helpful to share this fact with your kiddo when they feel alone and isolated. Let them know that there may be several people in their class experiencing the exact same symptoms.

What Causes Incontinence in Kiddos?

In most kiddos, it is rarely one thing exclusively. One of the most common causes of incontinence at BBPT is constipation. The rectum and the bladder are neighbors sandwiched between two relatively immobile bones, the pubic bone in front and the sacrum in back. When a child, or an adult is constipated the rectum can become distended, like a big ol’ balloon. When the rectum is full of poo it squishes the poor little bladder leaving very little room for pee to collect before a child has to go. Furthermore, all that junk in the pelvic floor reduces the feeling that it’s time to go until it is much too late. Even a child that is pooping daily may be constipated. How can that be you may ask? Well, kiddos that are constipated may actually be incompletely evacuating resulting in a build up of stool in the abdomen. Signs besides bowel frequency that your child may be constipated include, abdominal pain, large painful bowel movements, itchy tushes, or even poo accidents. If you are still unsure, some doctors may do an abdominal x-ray to confirm the presence of large amounts of backed up poo in the abdomen

The pelvic floor is another huge player in urinary issues. The pelvic floor refers to the group of muscles between the pubic bone in front and the tailbone in the back. These muscles help regulate the flow of pee and poo out. Sometimes these muscles are too loose to hold everything in. Often times they actually may be too tight, which can lead to constipation, incomplete urination, and believe it or not, these muscles may also be too weak to hold in waste during play!

We see other factors linked to pediatric incontinence. Keep in mind these factors are correlated with incontinence and may not be necessarily causal. Kinda like a chicken and the egg situation. One may have caused the other or one may have no effect on the other. With correlations, it is often impossible to tell. Here are factors found in the research that have been linked with urinary incontinence in kiddos:

  • Younger age
  • Male sex
  • Black race
  • History of urinary tract infection (UTI)
  • Family history of bed wetting.
  • Difficult infant temperament
  • Early toilet training before 2 years
  • Late toilet training after 36 months
  • Attention-deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
  • Stressful life events

What to do About Pee Accidents

We have established that having urinary accidents as a child is pretty common. So the first thing to do, and I’m serious here, is remind yourself and your kiddo that you are not alone and that it is not your fault. Keep saying it until it sinks in. Potty issues can come with the extra burden of guilt and shame. Let it go. It is no longer serving you or your kiddo.

Now, it’s time to get the ball rolling. Although childhood incontinence has a 15% spontaneous cure rate every year after age 7, it leaves out a whopping 85% of kiddos who deserve being able to play and go to fun activities like sleepovers without fear of accidents.

First, get yourself a proactive doctor who will screen for UTI’s. They often don’t show up the same way in kiddos as they do for adults. UTIs can cause incontinence and left untreated, they can be dangerous.

Then get yourself to a qualified pelvic floor physical therapist who has experience working with kids. A qualified pelvic floor physical therapist has the ability to assess the muscles of the pelvic floor in a non-invasive manner to see if weakness or tightness could be a potential culprit. They also are qualified to assess the abdomen to determine if backed up poo from constipation is worsening accidents. Based on what they find, they will taylor a program to help fix any potential barriers your child could be facing on their way to continence.

Things to do now:

  1. Explore Irritants: Certain foods can irritate the bladder and cause accidents. Check out this list {HERE} to explore potential bladder irritants. Keep in mind, not everything irritates everyone. What I would suggest is a blander day followed by a day where you add back in a potential offender. Bladder irritants usually cause irritation within 2 hours, so if you don’t see anything in that timeframe, that item is most likely off the hook.
  2. Schedule the Potty: Kids are so scheduled these days but we need to add potty breaks to the agenda. Having your child attempt to urinate, whether she wants to or not can help. I suggest starting at once every hour during the day and gradually increasing the interval as they succeed. There are watches like the WOBL watch that can help kiddos out, but I also find teachers to be extremely helpful getting a kiddo to visit the bathroom regularly.
  3. Pee at the transition times: This one is from my clinical experience. Make sure your kiddo goes to the bathroom immediately before leaving camp or school. The on the way home accidents are usually the last to clear up . So nip it in the bud ahead of time.
  4. Drink water! But not to close to bed: Your child should be drinking enough water to keep his stool soft and his urine dilute. Dehydration can worsen bladder irritation and constipation, which can in turn worsen incontinence. Just stop water intake 2 hours before bed.
  5. Manage Constipation: Give your kiddo enough time to poo and make sure her diet is varied so her stools are formed but not pellets. If you struggle with this, come see us.

Wrapping it up:

One more time for the people in the back. You are working so hard. I never met a family who is not trying everything for their kiddo. Incontinence is tough, but with PT and support it can get better. If trying these steps is not working for you, come see us.

 

Check out Amy’s book Heal Pelvic Painwhich includes a chapter on the pediatric pelvic floor.

Baird D, Seehusen D, Bode D. Enuresis in children: a case based approach. American Family Physician. 90(8) 2015

Maternik M, Krzeminska K, Zurowska A. The management of childhood urinary incontinence. Pediatr Nephrol (2015) 30:41-50

Vasconcelos M, East P, Blanco et al. Early behavioral risks for childhood and adolescent daytime urinary incontinence and nocturnal enuresis. J Behav Pediatric. 2017; 38 (9): 736-42

Von Gontard A, Kutwertz-Bröking. The diagnosis and treatment of enuresis and functional daytime incontinence. Dtsch Arztebl Int 2019; 116 279-85

Saggy Jeans and Tailfeathers: How Your Pelvic Positioning Affects Your Body

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Joanna Hess PT, DPT, PRC, WCS

Wait! Marie Kondo has you throwing out your favorite jeans because the joyless saggy bottoms that your tushy cannot manage to fill out? We are seeing an epidemic flat butt among mamas, plumbers, barre fanatics, and office workers—all with strangely similar symptoms—pelvic floor dysfunction, low back and sacroiliac pain, and a tucked under pelvis. In this blog we will explore why the position of the pelvis, the maker of flat butts and the maker of less flat booties, is important and how to more easily move out of this position for benefit beyond your behind.

Besides needing a new wardrobe, why should I care about my flat bum?

The flat bum or preference towards posterior pelvic tilting shrinks the distance between the front and back of pelvic outlet which changes pelvic floor muscle tension. The body needs access to the full range of the pelvis and pelvic floor muscles. Over time, this position could cause excessive pelvic floor activity to compensate for the loss of resting tension. Think of the pelvic floor muscles simplified as a rubber band between two points, the pubic bone and tailbone. When the distance between the two points decreases, the rubber band loses its stability from resting tension. Changes in pelvic position alters stability from the pelvic floor muscles. This posterior pelvic tilt position also decreases the accessibility for hip extension and therefore the upper glute muscles get sleepy. As the top of the pelvis moves back, the sacroiliac joint in the low back opens and decreases its bony stability. Translated into everyday life, the flat butt position increases the potential for incontinence, pelvic floor muscle tension, sacroiliac pain, and decreased efficiency in movement.

The Flat Bottom. Only in the eye of the beholder?

Pelvic floor and tilt

The disagreement of the “neutral pelvis” or zero-point causes confusion when describing pelvic tilt—anterior pelvic tilt, posterior pelvic tilt, and neutral pelvis. Some argue that the neutral pelvis is when the ASIS’s (front hip bones) are level to the PSIS (back butt dimples). Others say that the pelvis is neutral when ASIS’s are in the same plane as the pubic bone. Or for those with X-ray vision, pelvic tilt is the vector of the sacral angle at S2 in relation to the vertical axis. But often, neutral pelvic position is subjective to the observer and relative to other parts of the body—namely the spine/rib cage and thigh bone. Clinically, this “neutral pelvis” is hard to find because 1) pelvis’ are shaped very differently, 2) left and right pelvis on the same person can also be quite different, 3) feeling these bony landmarks have been shown to be remarkably unreliable, 4) the neutral pelvis should be on top of vertical thigh bones. See how the eyes can be tricked confusing spinal curve focusing on pelvic tilt without also including rib position.

Rib pelvic alignmentThe inability to move in and out of posterior pelvic tilt and anterior pelvic tilt decreases efficiency and possibly results in pain and instability. Anterior pelvic tilt is when the front part of the pelvis moves forward/down. Posterior pelvic tilt is when the front part of the pelvis moves back/up. A neutral pelvis on top of vertical femurs and happy rib cage should correlate with better muscle performance.

Do I have a flat butt?

Aside from the saggy jeans, the flat butts of the world have a few other correlations.

1. The Tailfeather Test: Stand comfortably and squeeze the gluts.

a. Neutral pelvis: Thigh bones rotate.

b. Posterior tilt-ing pelvis: The butt will further tuck under and mainly access the lower glutes.

c. Anterior tilt-ing pelvis: The pelvic floor muscles will do most of the work.

2. You bear weight more in the heels

3. Back of your rib cage is behind your pelvis

4. Your Thigh bones are angled so that your pelvis is front of your knees

5. Your lower belly pooch

6. You Sit with pressure more on the sacrum/tailbone vs. sit bone

7. You have Overactive and possibly overworking pelvic floor muscles—the front to back pelvic distance decreases with your posterior tilted pelvis and loses the resting tension from length. As described earlier, this is similar to tensile strength of a slightly stretched rubber band vs. rubber band without pull/tension. Therefore, your pelvic floor muscles have to work harder to keep some type of tension for purposes like continence, stability, etc. The inability for the pelvic floor muscles to work optimally can lead to incontinence, pain, and constipation.

9. You have Breathing and abdominal pressure problems

10. You have Sacroiliac joint pain. As the pelvis tips back, the sacrum moves away from the ilium decreasing the bony stability. The hip muscles have to work harder, but as felt in the Tailfeather Test, the glut muscles aren’t in a good place to work.

Is there a better fix than butt implants?

Bodies have and love variability for posterior, anterior and “neutral” pelvic positioning. The brain likes positions where muscles and nerves work with ease and stability—life shouldn’t be so difficult—but it needs the chance to choose and learn it. Folks working with bodies have traditionally “corrected” spinal curves by changing pelvic position. From what has already been discussed, spinal and pelvic position can be altered many different ways—from the changing weight-bearing area in the feet, to position of ribs and range of breath, and even head angles with visual and vestibular input. Consider these hacks into pelvic stability until the brain learns how to access this stability in many situations and positions.

1. Standing. Bring your chin down to your neck and keep looking down until you see the front of your ankles. You’ve just untucked your pelvis and brought your ribs over your pelvis. This one is courtesy of my colleague, Stephanie Stamas. Or check in to feel where the weight is going through your feet. The front to middle of the foot is a good place to start and then do the Tailfeather Test. You might have to toggle other parts of the body because of how the body will compensate in the chain.

2. Sitting. Get your hips as far back as possible. Or put a pillow in the back of the chair so that your hips can find the pillow and you are sitting on top of your sit bones. Then, relax the trunk into the seat back/pillow. Again, you’ve untucked your pelvis and brought your ribs over the pelvis.

3. Better squats/lunges/burpees/stairs/ab work. You can do 5 sets of 20 squats, but still no junk? Take care to see if your pelvis is tucking under in the movement. If so, use an inhale to keep the pelvic floor lengthening as your hips bend in movement. Later, the movement should be dissociated with breath pattern (as long as you are breathing.)

4. See a physical therapist. Often times, the habits of pelvic tucking are a little more complicated because it is a protective and compensatory mechanism for stability. A physical therapist can help with seeing the bigger picture and how different parts of the body relate to each other. They can also help facilitate better movement through manual therapy and specialized movement.

Good luck with the joy sparking!