PH101: Something’s Wrong with my What?

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Image via PlayBuzz

On March 16, 2017 at 7pm we will be kicking off our spring semester of pelvic health education class, we call Pelvic Health 101 (PH101). In our first class we will be introducing you to the pelvic floor muscles, where they are, what they do, and how they relate to the health and function of your bowel, bladder, and sexual functioning. We will also be covering how things such as alignment, posture, muscle tone and nerves can affect your symptoms. This course is a great starting point to help you understand your pelvic floor and pelvic floor symptoms.

Please join us at our office at:

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY 10017
Register at: pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com

Here is our line up of this and future classes:

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Spring Pelvic Health 101 is Coming

Fiona McMahon, DPT, PT

Pelvic Health 101 is back with some old favorites like, “Something’s wrong with my what?” and “Why is pooping so difficult?” We have also added a new course on pediatric pelvic floor issues.

If you have questions, we have answers. Join us for lectures and question and answer opportunities with expert pelvic health physical therapists, childbirth educators, and nutritionists. Please reserve your spot early at pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com. Remember spots fill up quickly. As always, light refreshments will be served.

pelvic-health-101-spring-2017

Ryanne Glasper and Melissa Stendahl Expand Their Expertise with Additional Hands on Training!

Melissa Stendahl, PT, DPT

In June, my colleague Ryanne and I had the opportunity to attend the American Physical Therapy Association’s  Gynecological Visceral Manipulation Course, taught by Gail Wetzler, PT, DPT, EDO, BI-D.

Gail is well known for her visceral (organ) mobilization skills and teaching worldwide with Jeanne-Pierre Barral of the Barral Institute. She is a leader in the physical therapy field and in education for women’s health, manual diagnostics, visceral structures and disorders, and integrative therapies for animal health. She is dedicated to techniques to help balance the body’s systems for optimal function. Gail is considered an excellent and sought-after instructor in advanced manual therapy techniques for PTs.

In class, we learned how to assess the  biomechanics and mobility of the pelvic organs (including reproductive organs, the urinary system, and the rectum). We learned  treatment techniques for these structures, and how to integrate these findings and techniques into PT treatment for injuries and disorders affecting posture, core stability, spinal mechanics, and overall movement. Having these skills helps the PT to more successfully and specifically treat pelvic conditions that affect bowel, bladder, reproductive and sexual function. It takes hard work and practice to develop the sensitivity to feel the organs and their potential restrictions, and the PTs at Beyond Basics have all taken advanced training to enhance this skill  because of its importance for our specialty in returning patients to good bowel, bladder, and sexual health and reducing pelvic pain.

We did a detailed anatomy review and excellent hands-on time with lab partners to refine these techniques for our own individual practice! Did you know: neighboring structures “talk” to each other within the body? For example: the liver  is a large organ located within the parietal peritoneum. This peritoneum is a membrane (a thin covering) that wraps around the liver and many other organs in the abdomen. It travels just next to, but does not enclose, the pelvic organs. This membrane becomes neighbors with the bladder, uterus, and rectum. If the liver  is damaged, injured or restricted, the peritoneum membrane enclosing it can tighten in response, kind of like how your arm muscles might tighten up or spasm to help protect you after a shoulder dislocation.  But since the peritoneum is also neighbors with the pelvic organs, this tight restriction at the liver can also result in tension all the way down to the bladder, uterus, or rectum, contributing to urinary or bowel dysfunction or pain! So it may be possible that assessing and treating these lines of tension can help get rid of lingering pain or incontinence, and is a great example of how structures near or even far from the original site of dysfunction can be involved.

So what is a PT really treating when they do “visceral manipulation”? Good question. PTs do not take the place of physicians who specialize in organ function and hormones, like urologists, colorectal, GI or Endocrinologists. But PTs can influence the mobility and positioning of the organs in the abdominal and pelvic cavities, so that they can move and glide as you bend over, run, poop, pee and ovulate, and to reduce inflammation from injuries, or adhesions like scar tissue from surgery. This can be a very valuable treatment option to promote better organ function for digestion, bowel, bladder, sexual and reproductive health.

Link to Gail’s site (https://wetzlerptcenter.wordpress.com/meditate-zen1.jpg

September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month

Blue ribbon

Fiona McMahon PT, DPT

September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. Here at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy, we treat many men both before and after treatment for prostate cancer. We focus on restoring the health of the pelvic floor and tissue surrounding the prostate to restore normal sexual and urinary function. For more information about how physical therapy can help you or someone you love who is going through prostate cancer, read our blog on prostate cancer: https://beyondbasicsptblog.com/2015/04/07/physical-therapy-and-the-prostate/

Beyond Basics itself has an outstanding program in pre and post operative prostate care:

 

Beyond Basics Physical Therapy

Pre-op/Post op Prostatectomy Program

110 E 42nd Street, Suite #1504, NY, NY 10017

T: 212-354-2622

Beyond Basics Physical Therapy offers a unique and comprehensive rehabilitation program focused on the healthcare needs of people who have

  •      Incontinence or sexual dysfunction due to prostate surgery
  •      Pain and/or bladder retention, frequency or urgency due to prostate treatment (with or without surgery)

Our physical therapists that work with these clients have extensive training and knowledge in pelvic related issues.

Pre-operative: patient will be seen by a therapist to not only evaluate their prior function, but also give them exercises to do before and after surgery.  The evaluation will include:

  • Muscle strength testing including pelvic floor and lower extremities
  • Biofeedback evaluation using either internal rectal sensors or external anal sensors
  • Education on what to expect and things to do to optimize surgical outcomes
  • Overall posture evaluation

Post-operatively: patient will be seen 2-6 weeks after surgery. Treatment will include the following

  • Muscle re-education utilizing biofeedback
  • Bladder re-education/timed voiding
  • Postural education
  • Overall core stabilization when appropriate
  • Behavioral Modifications

We treat our patients for 60-75 minute sessions in private rooms and use state of the art biofeedback technology.   If you have specific questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.

As always, our programs are tailored to your specific needs.