BBPT Health Tip: Adding Pelvic Floor Relaxation to Deep Breathing

Amy Stein DPT, PT and Fiona McMahon DPT, PT

 

bookhppThis blog contains information adapted from Heal Pelvic Pain by Amy Stein. If you are interested in learning more about pelvic floor exercises you can do on your own, please visit http://www.healpelvicpain.com/ , http://amzn.to/2ioSz2J, or visit us at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy in New York City to get your copy today.

 

In an earlier post we discussed the positive benefits of adding diaphragmatic breathing to your routine to reduce stress. If you missed it, check it out here .

But why not go a step further. Did you know that you can add pelvic floor drops to your breathing routine to help relax a tight and painful pelvic floor.

 

What is a pelvic floor drop?

A pelvic floor drop is the relaxation of the muscles of the pelvic floor. It is like that feeling you have when you can finally relax the muscle in between your legs after holding urine in for a long time. It’s a great feeling of relaxation and here’s how you can mimic it when you don’t have to go.

 

But How do I do it?

 

  • Step 1: Get comfortable. Sit, stand, lay down, whatever suits you, relax your body and close your eyes
  • Step 2: Breathe deep. Inhale between 3 and 5 seconds
  • Step 3: Exhale. Exhale slowly, 5-6 seconds. As you exhale imagine your breath gently placing pressure on your pelvic floor into relaxation. Don’t push or strain.

Like diaphragmatic breathing, you can use this technique throughout the day to help reduce stress and pain in the pelvic floor. Happy breathing!

BBPT Health Tip: Sleep Better

luna-moon-and-stars1

Fiona McMahon DPT

Anyone who has had or knows someone with a newborn knows how much sleep or lack thereof, can affect your health, comfort, and emotional well being. Here at BBPT, we see first hand how nights or even just a night of poor sleep can affect our patients’ symptoms from aches and pains, to constipation, to any chronic or acute pain condition and many more. Disrupted sleep is often the first thing we try to tackle in physical therapy because it is so integral to our patients’ health and recovery. Let’s explore some easy tips here:

Cut the screen time: There’s multiple reasons to do this. Incoming messages and news can jar us out of the relaxation we need to fall asleep. It has also been shown that the light emitted from our electronic devices can affect our sleep hormones making it harder to go to sleep.

Keep your bedroom dark: Lights emitted from chargers, light from outside can keep you awake.

Limit caffeine and alcohol intake: Both affect your ability to fall asleep and stay asleep

Keep your room cool: Your body cools as you sleep. A room that is too hot may prevent this. Keep your room around 65 degrees

Manage your aches and pains: Pain keeps you up at night. If an orthopedic condition like a shoulder injury is keeping you up at night, visit a physical therapist who can not only treat your injury, but allow you to find a comfortable sleeping position while you heal.

Manage your anxiety: So many of us suffer with anxiety and there are many ways to deal with it. From meditation, to deep breathing (include hyperlink), to restorative yogaand meditation, to mental health therapy, there is something that can help. Take the time to find what works for you.

Sources

https://sleepfoundation.org/bedroom/see.php. Accessed: November 30, 2016

BBPT Health Tip: Diaphragmatic Breathing

just-breathe-in-cloudsFiona McMahon DPT, PT

WE LOVE DIAPHRAGMATIC BREATHING! We do, we really do and we hope you will too. What is diaphragmatic breathing you ask? Diaphragmatic breathing is a form of deep breathing where you breath deeply into your stomach. As you breath in, you will actually see your belly extend and get bigger, and as you breath out, your belly will return to it’s old spot. It’s not like our typical breathing patterns where we breath from the chest; it is a much more deep and deliberate breath.

Why We love Diaphragmatic Breathing

Diaphragmatic breathing accomplishes a lot in the body. First of all, it supplies the body with a large dose of oxygen, which is pretty obvious, but it is a much more robust breath than a simple chest breath.

Diaphragmatic breathing also works wonders on the tissues of both the abdomen and the pelvic floor. By taking a big diaphragmatic breath in, the diaphragm lowers and provides a gentle stretch to the tissues and organs of the belly as well as the pelvic floor. As you breath in you are actually providing a nice stretch to the pelvic floor.

Deep breaths can also calm down the nervous system and allow you to better relax. When you are more relaxed your body can attend to the day to day tasks such as digestion and healing. It really is amazing what some deep breaths can do.

How to breathe diaphragmatically

Start off by putting one hand on your chest, at about the area of your breastbone. Place the other hand on your stomach. You can do diaphragmatic breathing just about anywhere, so get in a position that is comfortable for you. Start by slowly breathing in. In order to tell if you are using your diaphragm, you should feel the hand on your stomach move more than the hand on your chest. As you breath in, bring your awareness to your ribs and feel them expand out to the side and back.  Finish by slowly breathing out. The out breather should be longer than the inhale. It is really that easy.

How does one actually use diaphragmatic breathing?

Really you can use it in anyway you need too. Some people find it tremendously helpful to do 10 diaphragmatic breaths every hour, while others employ deep breathing techniques in times of stress or pain. The important thing about diaphragmatic breathing, or any exercise for that matter is consistency. Try to at least get in 20 deep breaths a day.