PH101: Optimize your Reproductive Health

preg

Fiona McMahon, DPT

Being able to get pregnant is sometimes a little harder than society will have us believe. The female reproductive system is a complex and intricate part of our bodies and there are many factors that go into fertility. If having children is a goal of yours, do not miss our free reproductive health seminar on April 27th at 7pm with physical therapist, Melissa Stendahl. Melissa will be discussing how both nutrition and pelvic and abdominal tissue health can optimize your reproductive function and help with painful reproductive conditions like endometriosis and pain with intercourse.

Register at pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com  today.

Location

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY

10017

Check out our upcoming courses!

pelvic-health-101-spring-2017

PH101: Ladies Only Session

By: Fiona McMahon, DPT
Hey Ladies!!! In our next installment of our Pelvic Health 101 course, we are hosting a women’s only session to allow for a safe and non-threatening place to discuss many issues that can affect the health of your pelvic floor. This class one of Stephanie Stamas’s (the founder of PH101’s ) favorites and is definitely not to be missed. Join us at 7pm on April 20th, 2017  Please register at pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com.

Location

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY

10017

pelvic-health-101-spring-2017

BBPT Health Tip: Happy Baby Yoga Pose

Fiona McMahon PT, DPT

Guys! This is one of my favorite stretches ever. Both for myself personally and also for my patients. It’s called the happy baby pose, which comes from yoga. I mean, how cute is that. If you’ve ever seen a baby try and stick his feet in his mouth you know where the name comes from. This stretch is awesome because it stretches a ton of muscles at once, even the pelvic floor. It is an integral part of my stretching routine and I hope it becomes part of yours.

Muscles involved: Hamstrings, glute (butt) muscles, pelvic floor,

Stretch Type: Static: Best if performed after workouts on warm muscles. Exercise caution if stretching cold muscle, because unwarmed muscle doesn’t stretch as well as warmed up muscles.

Caution: If you feel pinching in your hips or pressure or discomfort under your kneecap, move your hand position to back of the thighs. If you still feel pain while attempting this modification, it is definitely time for a physical therapy appointment.

As always: No stretch should ever be painful. If a stretch is painful, stop and consult your physical therapist for modifications.

Directions: Lying on your back, grip your feet on the outside of your feet and bend your knees up towards your armpits. If this is too difficult, grasp your legs at the calves. Make sure that your neck is relaxed and hold for 60-90 seconds and repeat. Add deep breathing to enhance the relaxation. Enjoy!

 

Check out our student showing off her great happy baby pose!

PH101: Does My Diet Really Matter?

Fiona McMahon, DPT

Gluten free, soy free, low FODMAP. It’s amazing how many diets there are out there that really can  provide people with symptom relief. If you are suffering with chronic pain you may be confused on where to start, or what is right for you. You also may have tried out a bunch of different ways of eating, not seen results and have gotten really frustrated. If this is the case for you, I highly encourage you to come to our next pelvic health seminar on April 6th at 7pm, “Does my diet really matter”.

jessica-drummond-headshot-197x300This seminar will be hosted by a special guest speaker, nutritionist Jessica Drummond. Jessica Drummond is a former pelvic floor physical therapist who now specializes in nutrition for those suffering with pelvic floor dysfunction. This seminar was a hit last year and is a great starting point for those considering adding nutrition as part of their healing journey.

Register at pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com  today.

 

 

Location

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY

10017

Spring Pelvic Health 101 is Coming

Fiona McMahon, DPT, PT

Pelvic Health 101 is back with some old favorites like, “Something’s wrong with my what?” and “Why is pooping so difficult?” We have also added a new course on pediatric pelvic floor issues.

If you have questions, we have answers. Join us for lectures and question and answer opportunities with expert pelvic health physical therapists, childbirth educators, and nutritionists. Please reserve your spot early at pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com. Remember spots fill up quickly. As always, light refreshments will be served.

pelvic-health-101-spring-2017

Yeast the Inflammation Beast

 

candida-albicans

Fiona McMahon DPT, PT

You are what you eat. Trash in equals trash out. You can’t exercise yourself away from an unhealthy diet. These adages are often on my mind as I make my food choices because of the myriad of health professionals who have taken time to come to our practice to tell us how we can improve our own and our patients’ health by taking more time to look at what we are consuming in our diet. Lately many of these clinicians have been focusing on candida overgrowth and diet, which can contribute to pain and inflammation conditions.

What we eat can directly affect the bacterial and fungal make up of the gut, AKA the gut microbiome.The gut requires a certain level of good bacteria to help us digest what we eat. Over time a poor gut microbiome can affect how efficiently the gut works. The function of the gut goes beyond just digesting food, but also is vitally important for the production of neurotransmitters, which help to spread messages within the brain and throughout  the whole body.  The microbiome also plays an important role in our hormones, and immune system. When the microbiome of the gut is not balanced, it is called dysbiosis.

One of the most common culprits in gut microbiota dysbiosis is candida, (Yeast!). Candida is a naturally occurring inhabitant of the body and when it’s at appropriate levels, it doesn’t tend to be noticed, but anyone who has experienced a yeast infection knows that if this little guy is allowed to go unchecked, it can do a lot to make you miserable. Besides plaguing women with itching, burning vulvas, yeast overgrowth may cause many other ailments.

Science has pointed to the role candida can play in contributing to chronic and inflammatory conditions. In one study by Kumamoto in 2011, candida overgrowth was associated with delayed healing of inflammatory lesions and were associated with pro-inflammatory cytokines (chemicals) and increased incidence of inflammatory bowel disease like ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s  disease.

Yeast overgrowth can also affect the bladder along with over colonization of saccharomyces (another form of fungus). In fact yeast and saccharomyces was found to be higher in women during a flare of interstitial cystitis than when their symptoms were low.

Yeast is not the only organism that can get out of balance and affect our bodies in harmful ways. There are many other players that can get out of balance. Some signs of an altered gut microbiome is a history of allergies, eczema, or repeated fungal infection.

 

What to do?

It all seems pretty dire, right. How do you control who is colonizing your gut, when you barely have enough time to make it to the gym after work? There are a few simple steps you can start with.

Avoid antibiotics, unless your doctor thinks you need them.

 

 

PillsThe medical community has become a lot more aware of the dangers of over prescribing antibiotics from their perspective, but it is important to keep in mind that a powerful antibiotic can wipe out good bacteria and bad bacteria in one fell swoop. If the good guys in your gut are reduced, the bad bacteria have a better chance of taking over. Take antibiotics only when recommended. Keep in mind antibiotics will not help treat viruses like the flu, they can only treat bacterial infections.

Modify your diet

spiced_mackerel_with_05813_16x9

Increase your consumption of good fats (omega 3’s) to help reduce inflammation.

Food high in omega 3’s include flax and hemp seed/oils, fish (the fishier the fish, usually means more omega 3’s, for example herring is higher in omega 3 than a milder fish like snapper). Also reduce your consumption of processed foods which can increase inflammation levels and eliminate simple sugars and fried foods. If this is only minimally successful, try a gluten and dairy free diet.  

If simple changes are not helping consider seeing a professional

doctorFind a naturopath, functional or integrated MD, or nutritionist who can investigate more fully whether or not you have SIBO (Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth), candida overgrowth, or other gut microbiome disorder. Or perhaps you are lacking certain ingredients, vitamins or mineral.  These professionals can tailor a diet and medication regimen to help return your gut microbiome to tip top shape.

 

 

Sources:

Kamamoto C. Inflammation and gastrointestinal candida colonization. Cur Opin Microbiol. 2011;14(40): 386-391

Upcoming Live Webinar: The Collaborative Clinical Care Model Between Therapists and Pelvic Floor Physical Therapists Involving Clients with Sexual Pain

 

Amy Stein, PT, DPT

WHEN: Monday, February 6, from 12.30-2.30pm at www.saricooper.com/webinars/

INTENDED AUDIENCE: sex therapists, general therapists, pelvic floor physical therapists and other health and wellness providers.

HOSTED BY : Amy Stein, DPT, BCB-PMD, IF and Sari Cooper, LCSW, CST

CEs for LMSW/LCSWs, AASECT

CEs for Physical Therapy

Blog By Amy Stein, DPT

I am so pleased to offer my first cross-disciplinary webinar with Sari Cooper, LCSW, CST, a leading expert in sexual health, sexual pain,and women’s health. She is the Founder and Director of Center for Love and Sex, and is a licensed individual, couples and AASECT-Certified Sex Therapist, sex coach, writer, trainer, supervisor and media expert. She specializes in sexual disorders, sexual avoidance, couple’s communication, affairs, separation, depression, anxiety, and alternative sexual interests.

Sari was trained in the Family Systems Model, which states that if there is a change in one person in the family, than it affects the whole family system.  This directly affects couples in which one partner is suffering with pelvic pain.  Sari helps the couple and the individual work on communication skills and gives them practice exercises to address their emotional and sexual relationship. When it comes to couples sexual function, Cooper feels she almost always asks clients to work with both partners.  Using techniques such teaching couples the importance of outercourse as well as intercourse in order to sustain erotic connection while a partner is being treated for pelvic pain.

Sari recognizes the need for a multimodal approach in treating pain. She has years long experience treating men and women whose pain is musculoskeletal, systemic, hormonal, or related to another condition, in addition to psychological. She is experienced and collaborated with pelvic floor physical therapists and other medical providers to aid in the healing process.

As pelvic floor PTs, we help the musculoskeletal conditions related to sexual dysfunction and we work closely with mental health and sexual health therapists.  In women, we see and have great success with treating conditions  like vulvodynia, provoked or unprovoked vestibulodynia, vaginismus, endometriosis, pelvic neuralgias like pudendal neuralgia, and other pelvic conditions. In men, we successfully treat musculoskeletal conditions related to erectile dysfunctions, non bacterial prostatitis, and genital and pelvic pain.

In our upcoming webinar, Sari will be reviewing some of the education about the female sexual response cycle that she provides couples to help them re-discover pleasure and eroticism while the patient is working with her pelvic floor physical therapist on relieving her pain.

To learn more, sign up for Amy Stein, DPT and Sari Cooper’s LIVE LUNCHTIME  webinar on Monday, February 6, from 12.30-2.30pm at www.saricooper.com/webinars/ CEs for PTs, LMSW/LCSWs, AASECT Therapists/Counselors will be provided.