PH101: Optimize your Reproductive Health

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Fiona McMahon, DPT

Being able to get pregnant is sometimes a little harder than society will have us believe. The female reproductive system is a complex and intricate part of our bodies and there are many factors that go into fertility. If having children is a goal of yours, do not miss our free reproductive health seminar on April 27th at 7pm with physical therapist, Melissa Stendahl. Melissa will be discussing how both nutrition and pelvic and abdominal tissue health can optimize your reproductive function and help with painful reproductive conditions like endometriosis and pain with intercourse.

Register at pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com  today.

Location

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY

10017

Check out our upcoming courses!

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PH101: Ladies Only Session

By: Fiona McMahon, DPT
Hey Ladies!!! In our next installment of our Pelvic Health 101 course, we are hosting a women’s only session to allow for a safe and non-threatening place to discuss many issues that can affect the health of your pelvic floor. This class one of Stephanie Stamas’s (the founder of PH101’s ) favorites and is definitely not to be missed. Join us at 7pm on April 20th, 2017  Please register at pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com.

Location

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY

10017

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PH101: Pain and Sexuality: Is it all in my head?

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By Fiona McMahon, DPT

Sex should feel good… really, really good. But when it doesn’t, you may start to wonder, what’s wrong with me? Am I broken? Am I a prude? Am I frigid? Painful sex isn’t something we talk about. No one would look at you twice if you walked into work complaining of pain in your elbow, but if you walk into work complaining about pain in you vagina or penis, you may end up having a meeting with HR.

On April 13th, at 7pm, we at Beyond Basics are breaking down those taboos and having an educational seminar, followed by an optional question and answer session at the end. We will discuss the many causes of sexual pain and how physical therapy can help.  The event will be hosted by one of our therapists, Stephanie Stamas, DPT, ATC. Stephanie will give a detailed seminar about pelvic health and take time to clear up some common misconceptions many people have concerning their bodies and sexual function.

Please join us at our office at:

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY 10017
Register at: pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com

Here is our line up of this and future classes

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PH101: Something’s Wrong with my What?

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Image via PlayBuzz

On March 16, 2017 at 7pm we will be kicking off our spring semester of pelvic health education class, we call Pelvic Health 101 (PH101). In our first class we will be introducing you to the pelvic floor muscles, where they are, what they do, and how they relate to the health and function of your bowel, bladder, and sexual functioning. We will also be covering how things such as alignment, posture, muscle tone and nerves can affect your symptoms. This course is a great starting point to help you understand your pelvic floor and pelvic floor symptoms.

Please join us at our office at:

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY 10017
Register at: pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com

Here is our line up of this and future classes:

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Spring Pelvic Health 101 is Coming

Fiona McMahon, DPT, PT

Pelvic Health 101 is back with some old favorites like, “Something’s wrong with my what?” and “Why is pooping so difficult?” We have also added a new course on pediatric pelvic floor issues.

If you have questions, we have answers. Join us for lectures and question and answer opportunities with expert pelvic health physical therapists, childbirth educators, and nutritionists. Please reserve your spot early at pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com. Remember spots fill up quickly. As always, light refreshments will be served.

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Upcoming Live Webinar: The Collaborative Clinical Care Model Between Therapists and Pelvic Floor Physical Therapists Involving Clients with Sexual Pain

 

Amy Stein, PT, DPT

WHEN: Monday, February 6, from 12.30-2.30pm at www.saricooper.com/webinars/

INTENDED AUDIENCE: sex therapists, general therapists, pelvic floor physical therapists and other health and wellness providers.

HOSTED BY : Amy Stein, DPT, BCB-PMD, IF and Sari Cooper, LCSW, CST

CEs for LMSW/LCSWs, AASECT

CEs for Physical Therapy

Blog By Amy Stein, DPT

I am so pleased to offer my first cross-disciplinary webinar with Sari Cooper, LCSW, CST, a leading expert in sexual health, sexual pain,and women’s health. She is the Founder and Director of Center for Love and Sex, and is a licensed individual, couples and AASECT-Certified Sex Therapist, sex coach, writer, trainer, supervisor and media expert. She specializes in sexual disorders, sexual avoidance, couple’s communication, affairs, separation, depression, anxiety, and alternative sexual interests.

Sari was trained in the Family Systems Model, which states that if there is a change in one person in the family, than it affects the whole family system.  This directly affects couples in which one partner is suffering with pelvic pain.  Sari helps the couple and the individual work on communication skills and gives them practice exercises to address their emotional and sexual relationship. When it comes to couples sexual function, Cooper feels she almost always asks clients to work with both partners.  Using techniques such teaching couples the importance of outercourse as well as intercourse in order to sustain erotic connection while a partner is being treated for pelvic pain.

Sari recognizes the need for a multimodal approach in treating pain. She has years long experience treating men and women whose pain is musculoskeletal, systemic, hormonal, or related to another condition, in addition to psychological. She is experienced and collaborated with pelvic floor physical therapists and other medical providers to aid in the healing process.

As pelvic floor PTs, we help the musculoskeletal conditions related to sexual dysfunction and we work closely with mental health and sexual health therapists.  In women, we see and have great success with treating conditions  like vulvodynia, provoked or unprovoked vestibulodynia, vaginismus, endometriosis, pelvic neuralgias like pudendal neuralgia, and other pelvic conditions. In men, we successfully treat musculoskeletal conditions related to erectile dysfunctions, non bacterial prostatitis, and genital and pelvic pain.

In our upcoming webinar, Sari will be reviewing some of the education about the female sexual response cycle that she provides couples to help them re-discover pleasure and eroticism while the patient is working with her pelvic floor physical therapist on relieving her pain.

To learn more, sign up for Amy Stein, DPT and Sari Cooper’s LIVE LUNCHTIME  webinar on Monday, February 6, from 12.30-2.30pm at www.saricooper.com/webinars/ CEs for PTs, LMSW/LCSWs, AASECT Therapists/Counselors will be provided.

BBPT Health Tip: Adding Pelvic Floor Relaxation to Deep Breathing

Amy Stein DPT, PT and Fiona McMahon DPT, PT

 

bookhppThis blog contains information adapted from Heal Pelvic Pain by Amy Stein. If you are interested in learning more about pelvic floor exercises you can do on your own, please visit http://www.healpelvicpain.com/ , http://amzn.to/2ioSz2J, or visit us at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy in New York City to get your copy today.

 

In an earlier post we discussed the positive benefits of adding diaphragmatic breathing to your routine to reduce stress. If you missed it, check it out here .

But why not go a step further. Did you know that you can add pelvic floor drops to your breathing routine to help relax a tight and painful pelvic floor.

 

What is a pelvic floor drop?

A pelvic floor drop is the relaxation of the muscles of the pelvic floor. It is like that feeling you have when you can finally relax the muscle in between your legs after holding urine in for a long time. It’s a great feeling of relaxation and here’s how you can mimic it when you don’t have to go.

 

But How do I do it?

 

  • Step 1: Get comfortable. Sit, stand, lay down, whatever suits you, relax your body and close your eyes
  • Step 2: Breathe deep. Inhale between 3 and 5 seconds
  • Step 3: Exhale. Exhale slowly, 5-6 seconds. As you exhale imagine your breath gently placing pressure on your pelvic floor into relaxation. Don’t push or strain.

Like diaphragmatic breathing, you can use this technique throughout the day to help reduce stress and pain in the pelvic floor. Happy breathing!