PH101: I’m Pregnant – Help!

 

Having a baby is exciting, fascinating, and nerve-wracking. If you have never been through the process before, chances are you have a lot of questions and concerns about what changes your body will go through during your pregnancy, what the birthing process entails, and how your recovery will go once you’ve had your baby.

Join us and childbirth specialist, Ashley Brichter, in our Pelvic Health class to discuss the ins and outs of having a child.

Register at pelvichealth101.eventbrite.com   today.

Location:

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY

10017

Time: 7pm on  November 6th , 2019

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Questioning Childbirth Status Quo, Part One: Common Labor Positions

The following blog is a repost of Ashley Brichter’s original blog post. Ashley is a  birth educator, birth and post-partum doula, lactation counselor, and friend of the practice. She hosts many classes on childbirth, lactation, and much more. We will provide more information at the end of the post on how you can get in touch with Ashely and how you can sign up for her excellent classes. 


Ashley Brichter

Originally posted: January 22, 2019 

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Hollywood misrepresents a great deal about the childbirth process, but the fact that they show everyone delivering babies while lying on their backs in a hospital bed is accurate. As Ross clearly demonstrates above, lying down with knees apart is the most common way for someone in the United States to deliver. Here’s why you may want to question this:

A baby’s job in labor is to rotate and descend through the pelvis. If we can maximize the amount of space a baby has within the pelvis, we can not only speed this process along but minimize the stress on muscles and tissues within the pelvic bowl (and therefore minimize the risk injury).

How do you maximize the space in your pelvis to encourage the baby’s rotation and descent? The pelvis has four boney landmarks that determine the maximum circumference a baby has to fit through: the pubic bone at the front, tail bone or coccyx at the back, and two sitz bones at the bottom. Let me walk you through two very simple movements to see how you can create the most space between the pubic bone and tail bone and two sitz bones.

If you’re in a location where feeling around on your pelvis would be immodest, make a commitment to try it the next time you’re in the bathroom or back at home.

First, find the space between your pubic bone and tail bone: 

Place one hand on your pubic bone (it’s very low down under the belly, right between your legs. Isn’t it wide!?). Place your other hand on your tail bone. To find your tail bone, invite your hand to feel between the crease of your behind. It is often higher up than most people realize.  You can walk your fingers all the way down the bottom of your spine until you reach the end – and/or lean back on your fingers in order to feel it more.

Once you have fingers on the pubic bone and fingers on the tail bone, lean forward and feel the space between your fingers. Then lean back. In which direction to you have the most space between your fingers, between your pubic bone and tail bone?  When you are leaning forward or leaning back? Try this a few time before you move on.

 Then, find the space between your sitz bones: 

This is best done sitting down on the edge of a chair. Place your hands underneath your bum and your should feel your sitz bones protruding down. If you don’t feel them right away wiggle side to side a bit. You should feel boney points digging into your hands. 

Now, spread your knees out wide (like you’re having a baby!). Feel the space between your fingers. Then, bring your knees in close together (keeping your feet fairly separated). In which position do you have more space between your sitz bones? With your knees together, feet apart, or your knees and feet wide?   

Hopefully when you tried it you were able to feel that there is more space in your pelvis when you are leaning forward and that there is more space in the pelvis when your knees are closer together than your feet. 

WAIT. What? That’s right. I said it. 

Most people deliver their babies on their backs with their knees spread wide because this is the most convenient position for hospital staff. If you’re thinking about a physiological birth, looking for ways to possibly shorten your labor, or looking for ways to reduce the risk of tearing, give some serious through to positions that lend themselves to forward leaning and keeping feet wider than knees!

Let’s take one more look at the tail bone specifically: leaning backwards makes the tailbone stick in. It limits the amount of space a baby has to rotate and it asks your body to push a baby uphill!  Upright and forward leaning positions will allow the tailbone to get out of the way.   Granted, you have to deliver with a provider and in a location that is supportive of this. But that’s for another post!

You can learn more about Ashley on her website: http://overwhelmingmoments.com/

Her blogs are available here

Click here for a list of upcoming events with Ashley

 

 

How a Birth Doula Can Help Make Labor a More Intimate Experience

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Chantal Traub, CD, CCCE, LCCE,

Pregnant mothers may be unsure if they want to work with a doula because they would like their labor and birth to be an intimate experience between them and their partners and wonder whether having a doula would encroach on their intimacy.

The role of the doula is to help ensure a healthier, safe and positive birth experience for the whole family. She will provide emotional support, physical comfort and the information needed to make informed decisions as they arise in labor at home or at the hospital. She will present reassurance and perspective to the birthing woman and her partner, offering various positional ideas for relaxation and labor progression and hands-on comfort measures like touch, massage, counter pressure and breathing techniques.

One may wonder how an intimate experience can be enhanced with the presence of a doula and the medical staff. Intimacy refers to the feeling of being in a close personal association and belonging together. It is the familiar and very close affective connection with a bond that is formed through knowledge and experience of the other. This intimate experience can be created by having the partner taking a role in the birthing process. The experienced doula will include the partner.

The doula’s presence offers a great sense of relief for both of you, especially for your partner who may begin to feel concerned with the responsibility of supporting you and may not know what normal is in this situation. If you’re having an intimate moment with your partner, an experienced doula will know when to step in and when to step back. She will encourage and allow you both to have that moment. In fact, she will look out for and suggest opportunities for you to be together. She will gently pull your partner back if your partner is feeling overwhelmed or feels worried seeing you in pain and give your partner the tools to help support you. If your partner needs a break or a breath of fresh air, the doula will be there, so that the partner can take care of themselves knowing the doula will take care of you.

The role your partner takes depends on the two of you. If your partner would like to roll up their sleeves and offer physical support or prefers to remain emotionally present from a distance, your doula will guide you. The doula may suggest ways for your partner to hold you or breathe with you. She can show your partner ways to massage and apply pressure while you are laboring. If a partner cannot participate physically for various reasons, they may choose to assist in other ways like getting ice and water while the doula manages the physical part, or merely remain emotionally present in the room. The intimacy is in the experience, allowing your partner to remain confident and emotionally present with you.

Whether your birth is unmedicated or medically complex, every family can benefit from the guidance and support of a doula at this often vulnerable and overwhelming time in their lives.

Chantal is originally from Cape Town and after years of working in film she began teaching yoga in 1996 and in 2003 she became a Certified Doula and has been assisting women in labor ever since. She is also a Certified International Childbirth Educator and a Certified Pre/Postnatal Yoga teacher. Her Prenatal classes are informative and educational and are designed for Labor and Delivery. Chantal has been teaching and assisting families in the New York Metro area for over 15 years and she combines her wisdom and knowledge to help families prepare for a positive birth experience

Chantal Traub, CD, LCCE, CCCE

 www.chantaldoula.com

Certified Doula (CD)

Lamaze International Certified Childbirth Educator (LCCE)

Certified Cooperative Childbirth Educator (CCCE)

Chantal Traub is a certified doula with over 15 years of experience and is a board member for the Childbirth Education Association of Metro New York. Originally from Cape Town, South Africa, Chantal received her BA of Fine Arts and after working for many years in film as an art director, she began teaching Yoga in 1996. Chantal is a White Lotus Foundation Certified Yoga Teacher, Pre/Postnatal certified Yoga teacher and Certified Traditional Ayurvedic Bodyworker. Chantal started her Birth Doula practice in 2003 after receiving her certification from A.L.A.C.E. In 2007 She became a Certified Childbirth Educator by Lamaze International and by the Childbirth Education Association of Metropolitan NY. Chantal is trained with Kate Jordan Pregnancy and Postpartum Massage Therapy and with The Julie Tupler Maternal Fitness Technique. She’s also Certified Kangaroula by Dr Nils and Jill Bergman. She lives in Brooklyn with her husband and two children, Naomi and Noah.