PH101: I’m Pregnant – Help!

Having a baby is exciting, fascinating, and nerve wracking. If you have never been through the process before, chances are you have a lot of questions and concerns about what changes your body will go through during your pregnancy, what the birthing process entails, and how your recovery will go once you’ve had your baby.

Join us and childbirth specialist, Ashley Brichter, in our Pelvic Health class to discuss the ins and outs of having a child.

Register at pelvichealth101.eventbrite.com   today.

Location:

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY

10017

Time: 7pm on April 25, 2018

Pelvic Health 101 Spring 2018 (2)

How a Birth Doula Can Help Make Labor a More Intimate Experience

affection-baby-birth-208189

Chantal Traub, CD, CCCE, LCCE,

Pregnant mothers may be unsure if they want to work with a doula because they would like their labor and birth to be an intimate experience between them and their partners and wonder whether having a doula would encroach on their intimacy.

The role of the doula is to help ensure a healthier, safe and positive birth experience for the whole family. She will provide emotional support, physical comfort and the information needed to make informed decisions as they arise in labor at home or at the hospital. She will present reassurance and perspective to the birthing woman and her partner, offering various positional ideas for relaxation and labor progression and hands-on comfort measures like touch, massage, counter pressure and breathing techniques.

One may wonder how an intimate experience can be enhanced with the presence of a doula and the medical staff. Intimacy refers to the feeling of being in a close personal association and belonging together. It is the familiar and very close affective connection with a bond that is formed through knowledge and experience of the other. This intimate experience can be created by having the partner taking a role in the birthing process. The experienced doula will include the partner.

The doula’s presence offers a great sense of relief for both of you, especially for your partner who may begin to feel concerned with the responsibility of supporting you and may not know what normal is in this situation. If you’re having an intimate moment with your partner, an experienced doula will know when to step in and when to step back. She will encourage and allow you both to have that moment. In fact, she will look out for and suggest opportunities for you to be together. She will gently pull your partner back if your partner is feeling overwhelmed or feels worried seeing you in pain and give your partner the tools to help support you. If your partner needs a break or a breath of fresh air, the doula will be there, so that the partner can take care of themselves knowing the doula will take care of you.

The role your partner takes depends on the two of you. If your partner would like to roll up their sleeves and offer physical support or prefers to remain emotionally present from a distance, your doula will guide you. The doula may suggest ways for your partner to hold you or breathe with you. She can show your partner ways to massage and apply pressure while you are laboring. If a partner cannot participate physically for various reasons, they may choose to assist in other ways like getting ice and water while the doula manages the physical part, or merely remain emotionally present in the room. The intimacy is in the experience, allowing your partner to remain confident and emotionally present with you.

Whether your birth is unmedicated or medically complex, every family can benefit from the guidance and support of a doula at this often vulnerable and overwhelming time in their lives.

Chantal is originally from Cape Town and after years of working in film she began teaching yoga in 1996 and in 2003 she became a Certified Doula and has been assisting women in labor ever since. She is also a Certified International Childbirth Educator and a Certified Pre/Postnatal Yoga teacher. Her Prenatal classes are informative and educational and are designed for Labor and Delivery. Chantal has been teaching and assisting families in the New York Metro area for over 15 years and she combines her wisdom and knowledge to help families prepare for a positive birth experience

Chantal Traub, CD, LCCE, CCCE

 www.chantaldoula.com

Certified Doula (CD)

Lamaze International Certified Childbirth Educator (LCCE)

Certified Cooperative Childbirth Educator (CCCE)

Chantal Traub is a certified doula with over 15 years of experience and is a board member for the Childbirth Education Association of Metro New York. Originally from Cape Town, South Africa, Chantal received her BA of Fine Arts and after working for many years in film as an art director, she began teaching Yoga in 1996. Chantal is a White Lotus Foundation Certified Yoga Teacher, Pre/Postnatal certified Yoga teacher and Certified Traditional Ayurvedic Bodyworker. Chantal started her Birth Doula practice in 2003 after receiving her certification from A.L.A.C.E. In 2007 She became a Certified Childbirth Educator by Lamaze International and by the Childbirth Education Association of Metropolitan NY. Chantal is trained with Kate Jordan Pregnancy and Postpartum Massage Therapy and with The Julie Tupler Maternal Fitness Technique. She’s also Certified Kangaroula by Dr Nils and Jill Bergman. She lives in Brooklyn with her husband and two children, Naomi and Noah.

You’d Prepare for the Marathon: Why Not Your Birth!

 

– Ashley Brichter

Fall always makes me excited for the New York City Marathon. What’s not to love? Cheering for thousands of people who have chosen to participate in an awe-inspiring test of endurance. I leave the sidewalk full of endorphins, adrenaline pumping! You may be surprised to find out how often I reference the marathon in childbirth preparation classes. Here are the eight ways I think running a marathon is analogous to having a baby:

You can prepare, mostly.

First time competitors never run 26.2 miles before race-day. They do, however, spend at least 16-20 weeks preparing physically and mentally for the main event. By running regularly and practicing complimentary strength training and stretching they move their body towards optimal conditioning. Pregnant people can work towards optimal conditioning by staying active throughout their pregnancies and receiving massage, chiropractic care, physical therapy, or acupuncture. And, like distance runners, hydrate and nourish their bodies well. Taking a comprehensive childbirth education course to understand what lies ahead, learning about pelvic floor muscles to understand pre and postnatal physiology, and exploring mindfulness practices to reduce anxiety and decrease pain are all essential preparation tools.

 Breathing is essential

Muscles need oxygen! That is probably more obvious for runners than for those in labor. The uterus is a broad muscle, contracting regularly in labor, pushing the baby down while helping the cervix dilate. Deep breathing also reduces anxiety!

The pain is temporary

The vast majority of pain in labor is caused by uterine contractions, not the baby passing through the birth canal. Labor contractions last about 60 seconds and are followed by minutes of rest and relaxation. It can be helpful to know that both individual contractions and the process as a whole will not go on forever!

Find your rhythm, stay steady.

Don’t start out too fast! When running a marathon, the excitement and adrenaline can lead you to do too much too soon. Similarly, in childbirth you are in it for the long haul, and early on your focus should be on conserving energy. Contractions should become ritualistic and having coping strategies is essential. Some people need music, others mantras. You can practice many different coping strategies ahead of time so you’re comfortable on game day.

Stress can slow you down

Oxytocin is the our love and trust and bonding hormone. It is released when we feel safe and relaxed. Oxytocin causes the uterine contractions of labor. Fear and stress diminish the amount of oxytocin produced in the body in turn slowing down or stalling your labor.

There will be moments of self-doubt

Because it ain’t easy. And endorphin production is on a slight delay. But, you can do it!

Support can make a huge difference

It’s always a good idea to have people cheering you on. No one can “run this race” for you, but people by your side can make it more possible.

It’s worth it

For Inspiration: Sarah Moore, Founder of FigTree Childbirth Services and Doula extraordinaire ran her first New York City Marathon last year, She wrote the names of 26 clients/friends/mentors on her arms so she could look down and thing of each of them  and the power they were able to muster when things got hard. doula

Ashley Brichter is a Certified Cooperative Childbirth Educator, Certified Lactation Counselor, Birth and Postpartum Doula in New York City.

PH101: Improve your Birthing Experience

Fiona McMahon, PT, DPT

pregnancy

Having a baby is exciting, fascinating, and nerve wracking. If you have never been through the process before, chances are you have a lot of questions and concerns about what changes your body will go through during your pregnancy, what the birthing process entails, and how your recovery will go once you’ve had your baby.

Join us  and childbirth specialist, Ashley Brichter, in our final Pelvic Health class of the year to discuss the ins and outs of having a child.

Register at pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com  today.

Location:

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY

10017

Time: 7pm on May 4th, 2017

pelvic-health-101-spring-2017

Spring Pelvic Health 101 is Coming

Fiona McMahon, DPT, PT

Pelvic Health 101 is back with some old favorites like, “Something’s wrong with my what?” and “Why is pooping so difficult?” We have also added a new course on pediatric pelvic floor issues.

If you have questions, we have answers. Join us for lectures and question and answer opportunities with expert pelvic health physical therapists, childbirth educators, and nutritionists. Please reserve your spot early at pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com. Remember spots fill up quickly. As always, light refreshments will be served.

pelvic-health-101-spring-2017

PH101: How does pregancy & childbirth affect my body? With childbirth educator, Ashley Brichter

Fiona McMahon, DPT, PT

pregnancy

Having a baby is exciting, fascinating, and nerve wracking. If you have never been through the process before, chances are you have a lot of questions and concerns about what changes your body will go through during your pregnancy, what the birthing process entails, and how your recovery will go once you’ve had your baby.

Join us  and childbirth specialist, Ashley Brichter, in our final Pelvic Health class of the year to discuss the ins and outs of having a child.

Keep an eye out for our next round of Pelvic Health 101 classes coming this spring!

 

Register at pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com  today.

Location:

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY

10017

 

Time: 7pm on November 17th, 2016

Sex After Pregnancy

By Fiona McMahon, DPT

Edited by Amy Stein, DPT

It’s cliché to say the arrival of a new child is one of life’s most joyful events. It certainly can be. It can also be one of life’s most stressful events. According to the Homes and Rahe Stress Scale, pregnancy is one of life’s most stressful events falling just after having an ill family member. Sexual difficulties and arrival of a new family member are ranked just after pregnancy. It is little wonder that among the joy and excitement that comes along with a new baby, there is also stress and anxiety. Childbirth can have a profound effect on a couple’s sexual intimacy. Understanding a little bit about the physical and emotional factors that can affect post pregnancy sexuality can go a long way to reducing stress and beginning to start a new sexual relationship with your partner after the arrival of your child.

The causes of sexual dysfunction postpartum can be multifactorial and varied. They can occur simply because of the sleep deprivation and lifestyle upheaval a new baby can bring to a family dynamic. They can be hormonal. They can also be caused by postpartum depression, which can have a profound effect on one’s sexual desire. There are also physical factors such as dyspareunia, the technical term for painful vaginal intercourse. Rarely one single factor is the culprit. Post pregnancy sexual dysfunction is usually caused by several factors acting in concert.

Dyspareunia or painful sexual intercourse is fairly common after the birth of a child. Between 4 and 58% of women experience painful intercourse after vaginal delivery. Painful sexual intercourse in women after the birth of their first child was examined by Chaychinda and Ungkanungedcha in a 2015 article in the Journal of Sexual Medicine. The authors of this study found no correlation between painful intercourse and the birth weight of the child, newborn head circumference, or whether or not the mother had a history of pre-pregnancy dyspareunia.

In another study by Signorello and colleagues, the relationship of sexual functioning after childbirth was compared to the degree of birth trauma experienced by the mother during delivery.  The authors of this study classified participants into groups that included, the intact group (no vaginal tearing or episiotomy), women with first degree perineal tearing (tears to the vaginal mucosa only), second degree tearing (tears extending to the perineum and perineal muscles), third degree tearing (involving the external anal sphincter), and fourth degree tearing (involving the anal sphincter and surrounding rectal mucosa). The authors of this study found that women who do not experience any tearing or episiotomy tended to be younger and heavier.  Signorello found that all women, regardless of degree of birth trauma, resumed intercourse by 6 months after the delivery of their child. Most of the women experienced pain when they resumed sexual intercourse with the degree of pain dependent on the degree of perineal tearing. Dyspareunia was found in 33% of the intact group, 48% of the second-degree group, and 68% of the third and fourth degree group. The study also found that degree of birth trauma and maternal age were independent predictors of return to sexual functioning.

Overall sexual functioning after childbirth was examined by Khajehi and colleagues in an article to appear in the Journal of Sexual Medicine this year. In this study, overall sexual functioning was examined after childbirth. Khajehi found evidence supporting the work by Signorello that most women do not return to sexual functioning until 6 months after childbirth. Factors that influence return to sexual intercourse included return of genitals to pre-childbirth state, whether or not there is prolonged lochia (bleeding after childbirth) and perineal pain.

The authors also cited research that women having their first baby are more likely to experience sexual dysfunction than those who have already had a child, with sexual dysfunction significantly higher in women who had just given birth to their first baby at 8 and 16 weeks after delivery. The authors also looked at emotional factors that can affect return to sexuality and cited research that, emotional disturbance, fear of another baby, and well-being of the newborn as well as relationship dissatisfaction are correlated with sexual dysfunction, regardless of the sexual orientation of the couple.

New moms are not to be blamed for any type of sexual dysfunction following childbirth. In our society words like “frigid” get thrown around to describe women who cannot or do not want to engage in sex. It is important to remember that your body has gone through a tremendous change and produced something truly incredible. It is okay to allow yourself some time to recover and to return to sex slowly.

The Mayo Clinic has proposed some guidelines on return to sexual function after childbirth. They advise that new mothers wait 4-6 weeks after delivery to have sex regardless of whether they delivered vaginally or by c-section. Using a personal lubricant can help reduce pain and is particularly helpful because hormonal fluctuations can leave the vagina dry and tender, especially in breastfeeding mothers.

Physical exercise can be key in managing stress, improving body image, and helping to normalize sleeping patterns, which can all contribute to sexual dysfunction after pregnancy. Try to get 150 minutes of moderate exercise in a week to improve overall health. It does not all have to be at once, but adding in short 10-minute bouts of exercise in the morning or at lunch can easily add up to the 150-minute recommendation over the course of a week.

If you are not experiencing any pain or discomfort and you have not noticed any changes in bladder and bowel function, then you can do specific exercises for your vagina to increase blood flow and pleasure during sex. Pelvic floor exercises (Kegels) are contractions of your pelvic floor muscles. You perform Kegels by squeezing and drawing up your rectum and your vagina, like you were trying to stop gas or the flow of urine. If you were sitting on a hard chair while performing a correct Kegel you can actually feel the area between your vagina and anus lift up off of the chair. The best part of Kegels is you can do them anywhere and no one knows you are actually doing them! Keep your Kegels to a contraction of about 1-2 seconds and start off slow building to 100-200 contractions broken up over the course of the day. If you feel any pain with the exercises or notice any changes in bladder or bowel health, then stop doing the Kegels. This could be an indication that certain pelvic floor muscles are in spasm or there may be scar tissue that is causing the discomfort, and it is recommended to see a pelvic floor physical therapist.

Remember to take it slow to returning to sex. Start off with kissing and light touching. If anything hurts it is perfectly okay to put it on the back burner and return to it later. Be willing to explore. You might actually come up with new activities to add to your repertoire while you are waiting to recover. If you find that you are still troubled by sexual dysfunction months after childbirth, consider seeing a pelvic floor physical therapist for guidance in your recover. A pelvic floor physical therapist will be able to loosen and free up scar tissue, and treat any tightness and/or weakness, and teach you about more gentle sexual positions and activities to help you return to full sexual function. Just like any other injury, the sooner the problem is identified and treatment begins, the better; however, most conditions can be relieved many years, or even decades, later.

Sources

Chayachinda C, Titapant V, Ungkanungedcha A. Dyspareunia and sexual dysfunction after vaginal delivery in thai primiparous women with episiotomy. J Sex Med. 2015;12:1275-82

Khajehei M, Doherty M, Tilley M et al. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Sexual Dysfucntion ln Postpartum Australian Women. J Sex Med. 2015 [Epub ahead of print]

Mayo Clinic Staff. Sex after pregnancy: set your own timeline.[accessed May 2015] http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/labor-and-delivery/in-depth/sex-after-pregnancy/art-20045669

Signorello L, Harlow B, Chekos Am, et al. Postpartum sexual functioning and its relationship to  perineal trauma: A retrospective cohort study of primiparous women. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2001; 184: 881-90