PH101: Something’s Wrong with my What?

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Image via PlayBuzz

On March 16, 2017 at 7pm we will be kicking off our spring semester of pelvic health education class, we call Pelvic Health 101 (PH101). In our first class we will be introducing you to the pelvic floor muscles, where they are, what they do, and how they relate to the health and function of your bowel, bladder, and sexual functioning. We will also be covering how things such as alignment, posture, muscle tone and nerves can affect your symptoms. This course is a great starting point to help you understand your pelvic floor and pelvic floor symptoms.

Please join us at our office at:

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY 10017
Register at: pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com

Here is our line up of this and future classes:

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Pelvic Health 101: Q&A with an Expert Panel

Fiona McMahon, DPT

Our expert panel class is a new addition to our PH101 course catalog and we are so excited! Join us October 27th at 7pm for an open question and answer format class with some of the world’s first and foremost medical experts in pelvic health.

Our guests will include Doctor of Physical Therapy and Founder of Beyond Basics, Amy Stein, Physical Therapist, DPT, BCB-PMD; Dr. Allyson Shirkhande, Urologist, Dr. David Kaufman, and Gynecologist Dr. Dena Harris. Please join us for this rare and invaluable opportunity to speak with these phenomenal doctors. Sign up early, this event will fill up fast! Men and women are both welcome. Sign up at: pelvichealth101.eventbrite.com. For those of you who don’t live in the area, but have questions for our experts, please leave your questions in the comment section of our post. We will try and get to as many as possible during the seminar and post the answers in a future blog!

Hope to see you there!

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A Pelvic Messenger Double-Header!

In case you missed them this week, we had not one but TWO back to back Pelvic Messenger shows, one on Wednesday, and one today. But don’t worry, you can still listen to them online, on our blogtalkradio site! Just see below for links and details.

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Wednesday’s show featured Dr. Philip Weeks, a naturopath who discussed the recipe for healing interstitial cystitis. Here is his biography, from our Pelvic Messenger site:

Philip Weeks is a leading expert on natural medicine and nutrition and a Master Herbalist and acupuncturist. Renowned for his deep understanding and knowledge of ancient medicine, he runs busy practices in London and Hereford, UK. He is deeply versed in Ayurvedic, Arabic, Chinese, and Greek medicine and synthesizes these systems in his clinical work with patients. He is the author of “Make yourself better: A practical guide to restoring your body’s well being through ancient medicine” as well as the book he will be discussing in detail today “Painful Bladder Syndrome: Controlling and Resolving Interstitial Cystitis through Natural Medicine.

You can listen to the show here.

Today’s show was a rescheduled episode, with Laurie Keefer, PhD. She discussed the psychological aspects of living with chronic pelvic pain. Her bio is here, also from The Pelvic Messenger site:

Laurie Keefer, PhD is a health psychologist and Associate Professor of Medicine in Gastroenterology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine.

You can listen to the show here.

 

Is It All In My Head?

By Riva Preil

Join us tonight at Beyond Basics, 7:00 PM, for the next installment of The School of Pelvic Health.  The next fascinating class is entitled Sexuality and Pain- Is it All in My Head?  Stephanie will discuss how pelvic floor muscle tightness and dysfunction contributes to dyspareunia, pain with vaginal penetration, arousal, and erectile dysfunction.

As a pelvic floor physical therapist, one of my biggest pet peeves is when patients inform me they have been told by medical care providers there is apparently nothing wrong with them.  When diagnostic tests, such as X-rays, MRIs, and blood tests, are all negative, and there is nothing apparent or blatantly obvious that is “wrong,” patients at times begin to question themselves. Some patients have even told me that they were encouraged to “Just take a Xanax.”

This, my friends, upsets me tremendously.  Not only are some patients being mis/un-diagnosed with a proper diagnosis of pelvic floor dysfunction, but they are being told they are psychosomatic or simply too stressed.

I like to make a clear distinction to my patients: It’s one thing to say it’s all in your head, and it is another thing to acknowledge there is a strong mind body connection. I believe in the latter, and many of my patients will admit they notice a worsening of symptoms when they are stressed.  The reason for this is because stress affects our muscles and body in actual physical ways and the manifestation of these physical changes are often associated with muscle tightness and pain.

To learn more about the mind-body connection and how it relates to PELVIC PAIN, be sure to join the class tomorrow night!  We look forward to seeing you there!

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The Hysterectomy and Chronic Pelvic Pain

Often because of the lack of understanding behind chronic pelvic pain, a hysterectomy is performed in hopes of eliminating said pain. The problem is that this can also to rectify the problem. In her latest blog post, “Hysterectomy for chronic pelvic pain? Ask these 7 questions first,” Dr. Jen Gunter, board certified in OB/GYN and pain medicine, discusses some questions to ask yourself to see if a hysterectomy is really necessary. For starters, have you checked for Irritable Bowel Syndrome? Have you seen a pelvic floor physical therapist?

Before undergoing such a serious surgery, it’s important to make sure there are no other possible alternatives, that your pain could not have another cause. Imagine undergoing a hysterectomy and discovering your pain was still there? It can be traumatizing, and to save yourself the trouble, give Gunter’s list a good read-through, link above. She’s a smart cookie, and we like her up-front style. And of course, come talk to us if you have any concerns about your chronic pelvic pain–physical therapy can be a tremendous help, and we’re glad to help ease your pain!

Health Professionals Gather for National Educational Retreat

Check out the press release from Amy’s venture, the Alliance for Pelvic Pain’s upcoming weekend retreat!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE           

CONTACT: Alexandra Milspaw
April 22, 2013
instituteforwomeninpain@gmail.com

www.allianceforpelvicpain.com

HEALTH PROFESSIONALS GATHER FOR NATIONAL EDUCATIONAL RETREAT

Bethlehem, PA – On April 27-28, 2013 leading health practitioners from New York, NY and Bethlehem, PA will arrive at Historic Hotel Bethlehem to host the first educational retreat for female chronic pain patients in the country.  Robert J. Echenberg, M.D. & Alexandra T. Milspaw, M.Ed., LPC, Deborah Coady, M.D., Amy Stein, M.P.T., and Nancy Fish, MSW formed the Alliance for Pelvic Pain and organized this weekend’s retreat, “Connecting the Dots of Your Experience,” which will offer educational seminars, interactive workshops, one-on-one attention and treatments by local health care practitioners, and more! Patients from 18 different states as well as Canada, and the United Kingdom will attend.

BETHLEHEM, PENNSYLVANIA

WHO: Patients, Health Practitioners from Bethlehem, PA & New York, NY
WHAT: Educational Retreat for Female Patients with Chronic Pelvic Pain
WHEN: April 27-28, 2013
WHERE: Hotel Bethlehem, 437 Main Street, Bethlehem, PA 18018

This retreat is created for female chronic pelvic pain patients with complex symptoms involving one or more of the following: Interstitial Cystitis (IC), Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), Pelvic Floor Dysfunction, Vulvodynia, Vestibulitis, Lichen Sclerosis, Pudendal Neuralgia, Endometriosis, and other pelvic, genital, and sexual pain disorders.

Heading the organization of this retreat, Alexandra T. Milspaw, M.Ed., LPC states, “Our mission is to expand knowledge and care to the underserved population of female patients with chronic pelvic pain. We seek to create an atmosphere where patients can feel safe to be their authentic selves. We listen. We care. We believe. This will be a weekend filled with compassion for the self, and forgiveness for others who do not understand the plight of chronic pelvic pain.”

Dr. Echenberg remarks, “My passion for integrated care in women’s health continues with the creation of this multidisciplinary regional approach to the clinical care, education, and research associated with pain in women. We hope that our retreat will contribute to ‘connecting the dots’ for individuals and the community at large.”

Those interested in receiving information about the next scheduled retreat please contact Alexandra at info@allianceforpelvicpain.com. Visit http://www.allianceforpelvicpain.com.

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