How to Deal with Pelvic Floor Pain From Home

woman-in-grey-jacket-sits-on-bed-uses-grey-laptop-935743

Dear reader, 

As I sit down to write this, New York City is on PAUSE, many other cities around the world are on various forms of lock-down. As a planet, we are working to slow the spread of COVID-19, the condition caused by the novel coronavirus. Those of you who are working from and staying at home, your efforts are noble and life saving. We thank you. For those of you in pain, we see you and feel for how tough it can be to feel like you have to wait to get help. Hopefully in a short period of time this virus will have passed . Follow these simple tricks to get started on tackling your pelvic pain. 

 

Check In With Your Seat

Work from home setups can leave a lot to be desired. Designed for portability, but not ergonomics, our laptop computers can leave us curled up like little cashews or “c’s”. This position tucks our pelvis underneath us and can cause us to put extra pressure and compression through our pelvic floors, not to mention putting extra pressure on our spinal discs. Even if you only have a laptop, you can remedy this c position by imagining you are a puppy dog with a tail. You want to sit so you could wag your tail like a happy puppy. Now for some people this may actually feel a little worse, if it does, this is not the trick for you. Don’t worry I have more. 

If you can, use a portable mouse and keyboard to discourage your cashew sitting tendencies. Arrange your setup so your eye line falls just about in the middle of the monitor by elevating it on some books.  You should be able to access your keyboard with your elbows bent at 90 degrees.

Now it’s time to think about what you are sitting on. I recognize that those of us living in teeny tiny NYC apartments may not have a lot of options to think about. But keep in mind that pelvic floor pain can be counterintuitive and an overstuffed couch, may not be the best thing if your pelvic floor is overworking to stabilize your body while you are sitting. Likewise, your kitchen chair may be too firm. Play around, how does the couch cushion feel on the chair? Is a firmer seat better or worse? You may have to trial and error your way into a solution.

Move

This one is so important. Depending on where you are geographically, you may be allowed different degrees of movement. If you are currently allowed to leave your home for exercise, go for a walk. Besides breaking up the day, walking can decrease the pressure from all the sitting you have been doing, as well as increase blood flow to the pelvic floor. While the requirements for social distancing remain, ensure that you maintain a distance of 6 feet (about 2 meters) between yourself and other people and wear a homemade mask.

If you cannot walk outside, and even if you can, get up periodically throughout the day. Stretch out, do some gentle air squats if they feel good. Look for some free restorative virtual yoga classes. Movement is medicine. 

Just be Happy… Like a Happy Baby

I love this pose so much that I could write a love song to it. Honestly. It works to stretch not only your pelvic floor, but your entire posterior chain  (back of the body). 

The most traditional way to do it, is to lie on your back, bend at your hips and knees, so that your feet are in the air, and grab the outside of your feet. As you stretch bring your knees towards your armpits. Hold this pose for 10 deep, beautiful breaths.

Feel free to modify this pose. Grab on the back of your calves or behind your knees if you have tight hammies. Put a pillow between your abdomen and thighs to prevent any pinching in your hip. It’s honestly all good.

Breathe

Another super important tool in your toolbox. Deep slow breathing can calm your nervous system, which can help to decrease pelvic floor spasm and guarding. In fact, in a study by Van der Velde, it was found that stressful stimuli do cause an increase in pelvic floor tightening. Try 10 deep slow breaths throughout the day and note how you feel from both a pain and stress perspective.

We are OPEN and also offering Telehealth

For those of you who are ready to get started NOW. You can. We are currently offering office evaluations and treatments, and telehealth services. Both Corey Hazama PT, DPT and Amy Stein PT, DPT are doing in person visits and telehealth visits are available with Sarah Paplanus PT, DPT.  For more information contact Beyond Basics Physical Therapy at 212- 354-2622 or check out our website: http://www.beyondbasicspt.com

 

Van der Velde J, Laan E, Everaerd W. Vaginismus, a component of a general defensive reaction. An investigation of pelvic floor muscle activity during exposure to emotion- inducing film excerpts in women with and without vaginismus. Int Urogynecol J Pelvic Floor Dysfunct. 2001; 12 (5) 328-31

 

BBPT Health Tips: Entering Hydration Station

Fiona McMahon, DPT

water-life-crop

 

The dog days of summer are here, folks! Walking from the subway to your apartment feels akin to walking on the surface of the sun and it’s nearly impossible to avoid sweating through the back of your shirt on your way to work. It’s time to think about your water intake.

At Beyond Basics, you can often hear our therapists ask this question over and over, “are you drinking enough water?” But how much is enough? Can you over do it? And lastly, why is it important for me to be drinking so much water?

 

Benefits of Hydration

 

  • Body Temperature Regulation: The body needs water to produce sweat to cool your body, without enough water the body cannot cool itself, which can be dangerous especially in hot weather. This is especially important in children and older adults
  • Physical Performance:  Decreases in athletic performance have been seen with as little as 2% body mass water loss. Ensuring you are hydrated ensures a better workout.Dude running
  • Brain Power: Even mild dehydration can put you in a bad mood, as well as affecting memory and alertness  study lady
  • Bowel Function: Not consuming enough water can slow down the movement of stool and lead to painful constipation  Excellent-toilet-paper-holder
  • Heart and Blood Pressure: Dehydration decreases the volume of blood in the body. With decreased blood, the heart has to work harder to circulate the smaller volume throughout the body, resulting in increased strain on the heart. This is of particular concern in those with heart conditions.  hearthealthy
  • Bladder:  Drinking enough water can reduce risk of urinary tract infection by keeping bacteria in low concentrations in the urinary tract. It can also reduce general bladder discomfort by reducing the amount of bladder irritants present in the urinary tract.

 

 

 

What should I Drink?

How much and what to drink isn’t always clear. I often get asked, what counts. Does decaf coffee count? Does juice count? My answer in the pelvic health world is no, water is the only thing that counts as water (even sparkling water doesn’t count). My aim is to reduce the amount of bladder irritants present in the bladder, in addition to adding all the other benefits outlined above.

So How Much Water Do I Really Need?

–  The advice for how much water to drink is varied. One common adage is to drink 8- 8 ounce glasses a day. This is a great starting point and doesn’t take into account an individual’s size or how much s/he perspires. We also can’t always rely on our own thirst. In both the elderly and children, the sensation of thirst does not always occur strongly enough or frequently enough to prevent dehydration. The common rule of thumb is to drink half your bodyweight in ounces. So take me, for example, your average 140 pound physical therapist:  Half my bodyweight is 70 lbs, so I should drink approximately 70 ounces or 8.75 cups. If I exercise, I should increase my water intake to match the amount of water I lose in sweat. Other reasons to increase water intake include, hot days, history of constipation or if you are breast feeding.

Another little saying I often say to my patients is, “If you are going to pollute, dilute”. What that means is, if you are going to indulge in a little caffeine or alcohol, follow it with an equal volume of water to prevent any dehydrating effects.

 

Sources:

Popkin B, D’Anci K, Rosenberg I. Water, hydration and health. Nutr Rev. 2010 Aug; 68(8): 439–458.

Healthy Chocolate?!

By Riva Preil

Fortunately for all of us- Yes, it’s true! Unknown to most people, chocolate originated as a life-giving and energy-providing beverage.  More than 2,000 years ago, the Olmec, Mayan, Aztec, and other Mesoamerican cultures consumed cocoa in the form of a healthy beverage eventually known by the Aztecan word xocolat, which means “bitter water.”  Cacao bean paste was mixed with water, chile peppers, cornmeal, and other ingredients and delivered a frothy, spicy “chocolate” drink.  All of the Mesoamerican cultures recognized early on that the cacao bean could provide a super-charged level of energy and nutrition unrivaled by any other source.

Soon enough, chocolate made its way to Europe and beyond, where it became an international hit and enjoyed a transformation from a spicy beverage to various sweetened concoctions.  Eventually, chocolate grew in popularity in the United States around the turn of the 20th century, and it was in the United States that the first solid chocolate was developed.

To Be Continued…