March 6th is Lymphedema Awareness Day!

lymphedema

Victoria LaManna PT, DPT, CLT

March 6th is Lymphedema Awareness Day! The lymph system carries the body’s waste products, dead pathogens, and water. Eventually these substances are cleared by the body. Problems can occur if the lymph system gets blocked and cannot clear these substances. Problems with the lymphatic system can cause swelling in affected limbs, and sometimes pain, as well as fibrotic changes in the skin.

You can be born with issues in your lymph system which can cause primary lymphedema or you can have damage to your lymph system because of surgery or radiation treatments, especially for breast cancer.

If you are living with lymphedema, try these tips from the Mayo Clinic to keep your limbs as healthy as possible:

  • Avoid injections, vaccinations, blood pressure monitoring, or IV’s on the affected limb
  • Don’t wear tight fitting clothing or jewelry
  • Avoid exposure to extreme temperatures, like hot baths, or saunas
  • Monitor your affected limb for signs of infection, and go to the doctor if you suspect infection

 

You can also check out our list of Self Care Tips 

Physical therapy can help manage lymphedema, which requires a very specialized lymphedema certified therapist.  At Beyond Basics Physical Therapy, we are lucky to offer lymphedema treatment with our own Certified Lymphedema Therapist, Victoria LaManna, PT, DPT, CLT . If you are interested in starting your lymphedema treatment journey, call and make an appointment with Victoria today!

For more reading on lymphedema, check out our previous blogs:

Lymph Drainage  Therapy for Breast Health at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy

Beyond Basics’, Victoria LaManna Receives Lymphatic Drainage Therapy Certification

 

Sources
Ness S. Living with lymphedema: Take precautions, get support. 2011. Mayo Clinic. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/cancer/expert-blog/lymphedema-management/bgp-20056387. Accessed February 10, 2017

Lymph Drainage Therapy for Breast Health at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy

Victoria LaManna, PT, DPT, CLT

lymphAs Breast Cancer Awareness Month comes to an end, we at Beyond Basics are working hard to help spread the word on the importance of regular self-examination and early detection. For further review, please see our blog post from earlier this month.

In addition to regular self-examination, regular breast massage is shown to help increase the circulation in your breasts. Therapeutic breast massage can also lessen discomfort associated with breast cancer treatments, help relieve post-surgical symptoms, and reduce discomfort during pregnancy, breastfeeding and weaning. Breast massage also contributes to improved skin tone while promoting relaxation and balancing your energy.
With regular massage, you will help diminish benign breast cysts while helping to flush lymph nodes and stimulating your glandular system. The breasts are soft tissue and do not have muscles to help them move, therefore they require assistance for improved circulation and lymph flow.
If you have been diagnosed with breast cancer and have undergone lymph node removal, mastectomy and/or radiation, you may experience lymphedema. About 15-20% of women who have axillary lymph nodes removed during breast cancer surgery will develop lymphedema. Working closely with your medical team to manage lymphedema is key! A Certified Lymphatic Therapist (CLT) can effectively apply gentle hands-on techniques to help enhance circulation and drainage.
Lymphedema is an accumulation of protein-rich lymphatic fluid in the tissues that contributes to swelling secondary to blockage in lymphatic flow when nodes or vessels are damaged. Individuals who have lymphedema may complain of discomfort in the affected limb, feeling of fullness in the limb, fatigue, or decreased flexibility. They may also complain of breast pain, tight-feeling skin, difficulty fitting into clothes, or tightness when wearing rings, bracelets, or watches. Venous insufficiency and obesity can contribute to lymphedema.

Complete Decongestive Therapy (CDT) consists of Manual Lymphatic Drainage (MLD) that aids in the circulation of body fluids, drains toxins from the body, stimulates the immune system and the parasympathetic system, reduces pain and/or muscle spasms, increases ROM, and decreases swelling. CDT can be used to treat conditions such as post-surgery and scars, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, infertility, painful periods, constipation, and irritable bowel syndrome. In conjunction, it is important to have an exercise program of stretching and strengthening to get the maximum benefits of CDT. After treatment, the patient may experience increased urinary frequency or increased amount of urine, increased sleep time or better quality of sleep, tension release and/or emotional release, or improved senses.

If you are seeking treatment, you need to see a licensed healthcare provider that is trained in Lymphedema Drainage Therapy. To find a specialist in your area, go to www.apta.org and click on “Find a PT”, specializing in LDT. Alternatively, you can search through the National Lymphedema Network or the Lymphatic Association of North America (LANA).

victoria2016Victoria LaManna, DPT, CLT, is our lymphedema expert. If you have had a mastectomy and are unsure about lymphedema care, she is an excellent resource. She will be able to instruct you in self- care and lymphedema prevention measures. Physical therapy can also help to release scar tissue in the breast and upper arm area, regain strength in the arm, and ultimately improve your function. Visit us, and read up on Victoria’s bio here, as well as on our website at: www.beyondbasicspt.com/lymphedema.

Beyond Basics’, Victoria LaManna Receives Lymphatic Drainage Therapy Certification

victoria2016Victoria La Manna, PT, DPT, CLT of New York, NY successfully completed Norton’s School of Lymphatic Therapy’s Lymphedema Certification Program. The certification signifies advanced skill in the application of complete decongestive therapy (CDT) in the treatment of lymphedema.

Lymphedema is the abnormal accumulation of protein rich fluid due to a disorder of the lymphatic vessel or nodes. It is a chronic condition that will usually worsen over time if left untreated. Complex Decongestive Therapy is the conservative treatment of choice for lymphedema and is reimbursable in New York by medical insurance. CDT involves a regimen of manual therapy, medical compression (bandaging, wrapping of the area), skin care, aerobic conditioning, and isotonic exercises done during the therapy session and at home.

Manual Lymphatic Drainage (MLD) Therapy is a gentle hands-on modality used to stimulate lymph flow and its specific rhythm, direction, depth, and quality over the entire body. This technique is used to aid excess lymphatic fluid to healthy neighboring territories and return it to the intact lymphatic system. The effects of MLD consist of:
• Relaxation, analgesic, diuretic
• Increases performance of the lymphatic system
• Re-routes fluid from congested area
• Softens connective tissue

MLD may also benefit these conditions:
• Lipedema
• Phlebo-lymphostatic
• Post-trauma or post-surgical swelling and healing
• Chronic Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS)
• Cyclic-Idiopathic Swelling
• Inflammatory Rheumatism
• Migraine Headache
• Sinus Headache
• Scleroderma
• Chronic Fatigue
• Fibromyalgia
• General Relaxation

Victoria La Manna, PT, DPT, CLT earned, and successfully received, the 140-hour Lymphedema/CDT Certification which fulfills the requirements to sit for the national certification testing with the Lymphology Association of North America (LANA). Dr. La Manna is an expert physical therapist at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy, which is located in midtown Manhattan. She began, and is currently the head physical therapist for, the Lymphedema Program, which addresses the upper and lower extremities and the trunk region in men, women, and children. She is a member of the Women’s Health and Orthopedic sections of the American Physical Therapy Association and the National Lymphedema Network. Victoria is also a member of the National Vulvodynia Association and the International Pelvic Pain Society.

Know Your Nodes, Part II

By Riva Preil

Approximately 10% of water that exits the capillaries and enters the interstitial space at the arterial end of the capillary does NOT return at the venous end due to pressure related factors (refer to Starling’s Equation for more details).  This “extra” water (referred to as the lymphatic load) enters the lymphatic system at lymphatic capillaries to the venous angles (the junction of the left subclavian vein and the internal jugular vein).  The lymphatic system meets the circulatory system at the venous angles, and it is where the extra water is returned to the circulatory system.

Furthermore, certain molecules, including fats from the digestive system and certain large proteins, are TOO LARGE to travel through the narrow diameters of the circulatory vessels.  Instead, they travel through the larger lymphatic vessels along with the water.

Now, moving on to the title of this blog…It would be impossible to explain the lymphatic system without mention of our ever so crucial LYMPH NODES.  Lymph nodes are small oval shaped organs that contain white blood cells, T cells, and B cells which are responsible for fighting infection and are a component of the immune system).  All lymph fluid travels through a series of lymph nodes, which are also responsible for filtering the lymphatic fluid.  There are approximately 600 lymph nodes in the average adult human body.

Know Your Nodes, Part I

By Riva Preil

Can you believe that Labor Day has come and gone?  Yes, dear readers, summer is officially over.  But boy, was it an amazing and memorable summer!

Believe it or not, when asked about the highlight of my summer, I unequivocally and enthusiastically respond that it was my lymphedema certification course.  (#PTnerd.  And darn proud of it too).  Fortunately, I had the wonderful opportunity to return to class this summer and learn some pretty incredible, stimulating, and practical material. Touro College, right here in New York City, hosted a course taught by The Academy of Lymphatics, one of the highly recognized training centers in the world of lymphedema.  The course was an intensive nine day class which was three classes condensed into one.  In addition, each participant was required to complete seven modules which included extensive textbook reading. Each module contained a written online examination which we were required to complete prior to attending the class. I found this approach extremely beneficial, because it allowed me to begin with a strong foundation.

The course itself was fascinating!  The instructor, Marina Maduro, and her assistant, Kirat Shah, are excellent educators who were clearly well versed in the material and who explained difficult concepts well. I would be one to know; let’s just say I am not shy when it comes to asking questions, and I challenged them on many a concept that they clarified and explained clearly.

You are probably wondering, okay Riva, so what did you ACTUALLY learn, in a nutshell, in this course?  Let’s start off by first discussing the lymphatic system itself.  I like to call the lymphatic system “the secondary circulatory system.”  It is an OPEN system without a central pump. The primary circulatory system, which consists of the heart, blood vessels (arteries, veins, and capillaries), are responsible for transporting fluids, nutrients, gases, and waste products throughout the body.  It is a CLOSED system with a pump (the heart)…

To learn more, stay tuned for my next post!