Diet and Endometriosis

Fiona McMahon, DPT

Yellow ribbon

Yellow ribbon, Bone cancer / Osteosarcoma. Endometriosis awareness.

March is Endometriosis Awareness Month. Endometriosis is a condition that is near and dear to our hearts at Beyond Basics Physical therapy. Endometriosis is a gynecological disease that occurs when a tissue similar to the lining of the uterus implants itself outside of the uterus in the abdominal and pelvic cavity. It is an inflammatory condition, whose symptoms can vary from mild to severe. Most commonly endo is seen as causing painful periods, but it can also cause bowel and bladder symptoms, issues with fertility, pain with sexual activities and general pain. For the past two years we have done a post about endometriosis during endometriosis awareness month on how musculoskeletal pain can be a contributor or the primary cause of abdomino-pelvic pain condition. To learn more about how the disease affects the body and its symptoms as well as how we treat the condition at BBPT click here:

For this year’s Endometriosis Awareness Day I decided to review an article on how diet may or may not affect endometriosis. The full version is here for free:

http://www.rbmojournal.com/article/S1472-6483(13)00007-2/abstract

About this Article

The article by Fabio Parazzini and his colleagues is a literature review. The point of a literature review is to aggregate many studies on one topic and determine a general trend in the data in one place. A literature review is not as powerful as its cousin a meta-analysis, in which more powerful statistical tools can be applied to interpret the data. Nonetheless, literature reviews can provide us with a general sense of what is going on in a certain field of research.

First things first, let’s talk about the limitations of this review. Designing a single study on endo and diet can be rather difficult. First of all, not all endo is the same. Women with endo can experience vastly different symptoms that don’t always correspond to the amount of endometrial deposits seen on laparoscopy. It can be really difficult for researchers to ensure they have a homogeneous (or similar) study population. Secondly, studying something like diet it usually correlational and not causal. Diet can reflect a lot of other components besides the nutrients going into one’s body. Diet may reflect factors such as culture, wealth, education, geographic region, which all may play independent roles in the diagnosis and progression of endo. Most of the studies examined were based on self-report, which also may not be entirely accurate.

Now that we have the caveats out in the open, let’s talk about why a study like this is useful. Like I said before, this article is an aggregation of multiple other publications. When we see similar results produced by different authors in different groups of people, it lends a little more weight to the individual study’s findings. Most importantly Parazzini is also careful to include information on why a particular food group may be more beneficial or even harmful in the progression of endometriosis.

What the Article Found

Green Vegetables and Fruit

The authors found two studies that show that a higher intake of green fruits and vegetables reduce the risk of endometriosis. They found that the higher the intake of green fruits, specifically (think okra, etc) caused the decreased risk of endometriosis and did not find the same relationship with green vegetables (think kale, spinach, and lettuce). Parazzini notes that green vegetables and particularly fruit are high in a compound called organochlorine, which has been shown in other studies to reduce the risk of endometriosis. Organochlorines are a particularly broad class of molecules and can be found in healthy things but also make up compounds used in industrial purposes. This study is referring to those occurring naturally in vegetables and fruits.

Vitamin A

Vitamin A is found in animal products like fatty fish, dairy, and animal kidneys and livers. Its building blocks are found in green and orange vegetables and fruits and can be manufactured into vitamin A in the body. Parazzini and colleagues found mixed results some with no benefit for development of endo and some that did show benefit. No studies showed harm.

Vitamin C and E

These vitamins were not consistently found to be helpful in reducing endometriosis risk. Some studies reported that increased amounts of vitamin C and E intake reduced risk of endometriosis, while other studies failed to yield significant findings. Parazzinni did provide evidence from other studies which demonstrates the antioxidant properties of vitamins C and E. Parazinni purposes that because there may be a link between oxidative stress and disease, vitamin C and E may be helpful in reducing the inflammation associated with endometriosis.

Red Meat and Saturated Fat

Again, results were mixed. Saturated fat mainly occurs in animal products. Some studies found a correlation between red meat and endo risk, but no association with butter. In other the results were flipped.

Other items investigated

  • Soy
  • Olive Oil
  • Fish and Omega 3
  • Minimal to no evidence supporting associations between endo and dietary intake for any of these products were found.

 

What’s it All Mean?

One of my patients once told me she was instructed to finish every study, with the phrase, “more research is needed.” This is certainly the case in the field of endometriosis treatment. There’s a lot about endometriosis that we don’t understand We need well constructed studies that will allow researchers to do more powerful meta-analysis to help guide our treatment. This review was only able to include 11 studies for review out of the 256 initially found.

With all that said, I do think there are some key takeaways from this study. There was a general trend in healthier foods and more promising results. Parazinni was also diligent to include mechanisms by which these healthy foods could be helpful. Secondly, there was no harm found by eating what is considered a healthy diet, (high in greens and vitamins). These findings, although small, in combination with the general benefits of a healthy diet, should encourage patients with endo to explore in more depth how eating certain foods affects their symptoms.

At Beyond Basics we take pride in treating our patients from a holistic perspective and we appreciate that we can collaborate with other healthcare providers in our community, including expert nutritionists, naturopaths, functional medicine doctors and mental health therapists. We find that the combination of diet, specific physical therapy techniques, mental health and self-care, can significantly reduce pain and other symptoms and improve function in many patients. Our clinicians specifically are experts in manual therapy techniques such as visceral and connective tissue mobilization techniques, myofascial release and other soft tissue mobilization techniques discussed in the previously mentioned endometriosis blogs. If you are suffering from endometriosis, come visit us today.

Learn more about what we do at BBPT with our upcoming PH101 classes, which are free to the public. Here are some you may find interesting:

April 6th: Does my diet really matter?

April 13th: Pain & Sexuality: Is it all in my head? No, it is not!

April 20th: Ladies Only Session

April 27th: Optimize reproductive health

May 4th: Improve your birthing experience.

All events are at 7pm with light snacks.

Register at: pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com because space is limited!!

See full list of classes below

pelvic-health-101-spring-2017

Yeast the Inflammation Beast

 

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Fiona McMahon DPT, PT

You are what you eat. Trash in equals trash out. You can’t exercise yourself away from an unhealthy diet. These adages are often on my mind as I make my food choices because of the myriad of health professionals who have taken time to come to our practice to tell us how we can improve our own and our patients’ health by taking more time to look at what we are consuming in our diet. Lately many of these clinicians have been focusing on candida overgrowth and diet, which can contribute to pain and inflammation conditions.

What we eat can directly affect the bacterial and fungal make up of the gut, AKA the gut microbiome.The gut requires a certain level of good bacteria to help us digest what we eat. Over time a poor gut microbiome can affect how efficiently the gut works. The function of the gut goes beyond just digesting food, but also is vitally important for the production of neurotransmitters, which help to spread messages within the brain and throughout  the whole body.  The microbiome also plays an important role in our hormones, and immune system. When the microbiome of the gut is not balanced, it is called dysbiosis.

One of the most common culprits in gut microbiota dysbiosis is candida, (Yeast!). Candida is a naturally occurring inhabitant of the body and when it’s at appropriate levels, it doesn’t tend to be noticed, but anyone who has experienced a yeast infection knows that if this little guy is allowed to go unchecked, it can do a lot to make you miserable. Besides plaguing women with itching, burning vulvas, yeast overgrowth may cause many other ailments.

Science has pointed to the role candida can play in contributing to chronic and inflammatory conditions. In one study by Kumamoto in 2011, candida overgrowth was associated with delayed healing of inflammatory lesions and were associated with pro-inflammatory cytokines (chemicals) and increased incidence of inflammatory bowel disease like ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s  disease.

Yeast overgrowth can also affect the bladder along with over colonization of saccharomyces (another form of fungus). In fact yeast and saccharomyces was found to be higher in women during a flare of interstitial cystitis than when their symptoms were low.

Yeast is not the only organism that can get out of balance and affect our bodies in harmful ways. There are many other players that can get out of balance. Some signs of an altered gut microbiome is a history of allergies, eczema, or repeated fungal infection.

 

What to do?

It all seems pretty dire, right. How do you control who is colonizing your gut, when you barely have enough time to make it to the gym after work? There are a few simple steps you can start with.

Avoid antibiotics, unless your doctor thinks you need them.

 

 

PillsThe medical community has become a lot more aware of the dangers of over prescribing antibiotics from their perspective, but it is important to keep in mind that a powerful antibiotic can wipe out good bacteria and bad bacteria in one fell swoop. If the good guys in your gut are reduced, the bad bacteria have a better chance of taking over. Take antibiotics only when recommended. Keep in mind antibiotics will not help treat viruses like the flu, they can only treat bacterial infections.

Modify your diet

spiced_mackerel_with_05813_16x9

Increase your consumption of good fats (omega 3’s) to help reduce inflammation.

Food high in omega 3’s include flax and hemp seed/oils, fish (the fishier the fish, usually means more omega 3’s, for example herring is higher in omega 3 than a milder fish like snapper). Also reduce your consumption of processed foods which can increase inflammation levels and eliminate simple sugars and fried foods. If this is only minimally successful, try a gluten and dairy free diet.  

If simple changes are not helping consider seeing a professional

doctorFind a naturopath, functional or integrated MD, or nutritionist who can investigate more fully whether or not you have SIBO (Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth), candida overgrowth, or other gut microbiome disorder. Or perhaps you are lacking certain ingredients, vitamins or mineral.  These professionals can tailor a diet and medication regimen to help return your gut microbiome to tip top shape.

 

 

Sources:

Kamamoto C. Inflammation and gastrointestinal candida colonization. Cur Opin Microbiol. 2011;14(40): 386-391

BBPT Health Tip: Eat your Fiber

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Fiona McMahon, DPT, PT

What is fiber?

Fiber, it’s the hot ticket. It is being marketed to us like crazy. But why is fiber is so important? What fiber is best? Should you get more fiber with supplements? Let’s take a closer look into the benefits of fiber in this edition of BBPT’s Health tips.

Fiber is the part of food that we cannot digest. It is separated into two types, soluble and insoluble. Both bulk up the contents of your stomach and colon, which can help you feel more full but after that, the similarities end.

As the name implies, soluble fiber dissolves in water but insoluble does not. Insoluble fiber increases the mass of the stool and helps to get things moving, in terms of passing feces. Soluble fiber absorbs water. The truth is, most people are not getting enough fiber. Less than half of people in the United States consume the recommended amount of fiber. Let’s discuss the benefits of fiber and how to make sure you are getting enough.

So what if you don’t have issues going number 2? What else can fiber help you with?

Fiber has been shown to help with reducing the risk of the following conditions:

  • Coronary artery disease
  • Stroke
  • High blood pressure
  • Diabetes
  • Obesity

Fiber has also been shown to:

  • Improve insulin sensitivity in people who have diabetes
  • Enhance weight loss
  • Improve GI conditions like acid reflux, duodenal ulcers, diverticulitis, constipation, and hemorrhoids
  • Enhance the function of the immune system

How much to eat and where to get it?

Men under 50 years and under should consume at least 38 grams of fiber daily, Women under 50 should consume at least 25 grams of fiber daily. Women over 50 should eat at least 21 grams and men over 50 should get 30.  Those who suffer from constipation may add more to your diet.   We suggest contacting a nutritionist for proper amounts of soluble versus insoluble in these cases and anyone with a history of GI issues.  Also, please discuss with your doctor before making any drastic changes to your diet.  

Adding  fiber to your diet when you are not used to it can sometimes be a little difficult. If you add too much too quickly, you may experience gas and bloating. Start slow and work your way up.  Also, drink plenty of water.

Start by adding in whole wheat items (unless you have a gluten sensitivity), legumes, fruits, and vegetables slowly to your diet. Check out the Mayo Clinic’s full list of fiber rich foods here .

Sources

Anderson J, Baird P, Davis R, et al. Health benefits of dietary fiber. Nutr Rev. 2009. 67(4)188-205

Family Doctor.org Decermber 2010: http://familydoctor.org/familydoctor/en/prevention-wellness/food-nutrition/nutrients/fiber-how-to-increase-the-amount-in-your-diet.printerview.all.html. Accessed November 11, 2016.

Medlineplus. Soluble vs. insoluble fiber.https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002136.htm. Accessed November 17,2016.  

PH101: Reproductive Health and Nutrition with Melissa Stendahl, DPT & Nutritionist Jessica Drummond, MPT, CCN, CHC.

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Fiona McMahon, DPT

Being able to get pregnant is sometimes a little harder than society will have us believe. The female reproductive system is a complex and intricate part of our bodies and there are many factors that go into fertility. If having children is a goal of yours, do not miss our free reproductive health seminar on November 10th at 7pm with nutritionist, Kamila Veljkovic and physical therapist, Melissa Stendahl. They will be discussing how both nutrition and pelvic and abdominal tissue health can optimize your reproductive function and help with painful reproductive conditions like endometriosis and pain with intercourse.

 

Register at pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com  today.

Location

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY

10017

 

Check out our upcoming courses!

Pelvic Health 101 Fall- (003)

PH101 Does my diet really matter?

Fiona McMahon, DPT

Gluten free, soy free, low FODMAP. It’s amazing how many diets there are out there that really can  provide people with symptom relief. If you are suffering with chronic pain you may be confused on where to start, or what is right for you. You also may have tried out a bunch of different ways of eating, not seen results and have gotten really frustrated. If this is the case for you, I highly encourage you to come to our next pelvic health seminar on October 27th at 7pm, “Does my diet really matter”.

jessica-drummond-headshot-197x300This seminar will be hosted by a special guest speaker, nutritionist Jessica Drummond. Jessica Drummond is a former pelvic floor physical therapist who now specializes in nutrition for those suffering with pelvic floor dysfunction. This seminar was a hit last year and is a great starting point for those considering adding nutrition as part of their healing journey.

 

 

 

Register at pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com  today.

Location

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY

10017

Pelvic Health 101 Fall- (003)

Exercise, The Female Athlete, and the Pelvic Floor

active-image

Fiona McMahon PT, DPT

In honor of National Women’s Health and Fitness Day ,September  28, we are exploring the benefits of regular exercise for women as well as addressing some pitfalls (pelvic floor included), that female athletes can fall into too. It is far too often that women find themselves sidelined from their favorite sports and fitness routines secondary to issues like orthopedic or sports-related pain or incontinence. Although all the issues outlined in this blog can occur to both genders, many of these conditions are more likely to happen to females, secondary to their pelvic structure and physiology.

 

Exercise and Its Benefits

heart-health

 

The benefits of exercise are too numerous to discuss every single one here and span the physical to the emotional. There are a number of conditions that have profound effects on the health of women nationwide. Let’s explore some of exercise’s specific benefits for these conditions together.

Heart Disease

According to the American Heart Association, Heart disease is the number one killer of women in the US and is responsible for 1 in 3 female deaths.  Exercise and a healthy lifestyle have been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease by 80%. The American Heart Association recommends 150 minutes of moderate activity or 75 minutes of vigorous activity to stave off heart disease.

Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is unfortunately a common affliction among white and asian urban dwelling females.  It is characterized by reduced bone density, which causes bones to be fragile and increases the risk of fracture in individuals that have osteoporosis. Exercise has been shown to be helpful in both reducing the risk of osteoporosis as well as improving the bone mineral density of those who already have osteoporosis.

Other benefits of regular exercise include:

  • Reduced risk of diabetes
  • Reduced risk of colon cancer
  • Improved psychological well being
  • Maintenance of healthy body weight

Remember, it is important to consult with a trained healthcare professional before commencing a new fitness routine.

 

The Female Athlete Triad- Aka the Downside

All things in moderation. Although exercise is beneficial it is easy to over do it. It becomes easier to slip into an unhealthy relationship with exercise, especially in women who are training at elite levels, have eating disorders, or body dysmorphia issues.

The  female athlete triad consists of three disorders that can have severe health consequences in both the near and long term. The three disorders that compose the female athlete triad are:femaletriad

  1. Disordered Eating
  2. Ammenorrhea (absent periods or periods that are irregular)
  3. Osteoporosis

The female athlete triad is often attributed to the expectation that women keep a slender appearance. Girls and women who have body image issues may be at greater risk. The female athlete triad is dangerous and has the potential to be deadly. Osteoporosis can result  in fractures and eating disorders can seriously impact fertility, or even throw off the delicate balance of electrolytes in their system, putting them at serious risk for a cardiac event.

Warning signs of the female athlete triad include:

  • Yellowing of skin
  • Stress fractures
  • Rapid fluctuations in weight
  • Development of baby hair over skin
  • Daily vigorous exercise to an excessive level

 

The female athlete triad requires a multidisciplinary approach from medical, to psychological to nutrition.  It is important for someone who is suffering from the female athlete triad to seek help in order to safeguard their health and emotional well being.

 

Athletics and The Pelvic Floor

d14e2-tipsforahappyandhealthyvaginaLike any muscle, the pelvic floor can get fatigued, strained, or even go into a painful muscle spasm. The thing about the pelvic floor muscles, is that they have to work in almost every athletic pursuit. They work in partnership with the multifidus of the back, the transverse abdominus of the belly, and the diaphragm to stabilize and protect your spine. They also contract with every step during running activities to prevent your pelvic organs from dropping down in your pelvic cavity and to prevent urinary and or fecal leakage. Things can go wrong when the pelvic floor or other core muscles don’t function properly. Athletes’ pelvic floors can become tight and restricted, preventing closure of sphincters and support of pelvic organs. They may go into spasm from working too hard to stabilize the spine, if one of the other core muscles is failing to pull its weight.

Recently there has been more work to investigate the link between athletes and pelvic floor dysfunction. A recent study found that self identified female triathletes suffer from urinary and fecal incontinence at rates as high as 37.4% and 28.0%, respectively. Similar results were also found on a group of runners. Of the triathletes studied, nearly a quarter of them fit the criteria for female athlete triad, discussed earlier in this post.

Does this mean you have to give up your penchant for running? NO! (hellooooooo the author of this post is a runner), but if you find yourself experiencing incontinence, pain, constipation, and or painful sex, something is wrong and you must intervene in order to protect your long term health and your ability to participate in your favorite sport. At Beyond Basics Physical Therapy we combine orthopedic and pelvic expertise to help return athletes to their sports in a more functional and less painful condition. We relax tight muscles of the pelvic floor, train the core, including the pelvic floor if needed, to do its fair share, and return normal postural and structural alignment to our patients. We work one on one with you to develop a home exercise plan to help you reach your goals and prevent a reoccurrence of your pelvic floor or core disorder.

 

Please come see us so you can return to your sport in a better and more optimal condition than when you started: http://www.beyondbasicsphysicaltherapy.com/

 

 

Sources

American College of Sports Medicine. Information on … the female athlete triad. https://www.acsm.org/docs/brochures/the-female-athlete-triad.pdf. Accessed September 19, 2016

 

American Heart Association. Facts About Heart Disease in Women.  2016. https://www.goredforwomen.org/home/about-heart-disease-in-women/facts-about-heart-disease/. Accessed: September 6, 2016

 

Bø, K. Urinary incontinence, pelvic floor dysfunction, exercise and sport. Sports Medicine, 34(7), 451-464. 2004.

 

Illinois Department of Public Health: Women’s Health. Facts about  women’s wellness exercise . http://www.idph.state.il.us/about/womenshealth/factsheets/exer.htm Accessed: September 13 2016

 

Loyola University Health System. “Female triathletes at higher risk for pelvic floor disorders.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 August 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/08/160823165743.htm>.

 

Stampfer M, Hu F, Manson J, et al. Primary prevention of coronary heart disease in women through diet and lifestyle. The New England Journal of Medicine. 2000; 343(1). 16- 22
Todd J, Robinson R. Osteoporosis and exercise. Postgrad Med J. 2003; 79:320-23

Beyond Basics’s Pro-Bono Clinic for PT Day of Service!

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Victoria LaManna, DPT

October is around the corner! And a busy month for many. Whether you are getting back into the swing of school or work after summer vacation, preparing your Halloween costume or getting ready for all the upcoming holidays right around the corner – there is a lot going on!
This time of year is also an opportunity to do good and give back. October is National Physical Therapy Month, where physical therapists celebrate their amazing field of healing and getting people back to optimal function. In addition, many of the PT’s throughout the U.S. give back to their communities during this month. This year we are taking it up a notch. Physical therapists WORLDWIDE are getting involved for the second annual Global PT Day of Service Saturday, October 15th. Whether it is by hosting a pro-bono clinic, serving in a soup kitchen, participating in a 5k for a cause, or cleaning up a community garden – physical therapists globally as a profession are coming together to make a positive impact on the world around them.
At Beyond Basics, we have decided to host a pro-bono clinic Saturday, October 1st to give back to those in the New York City area who may not have insurance or access to physical therapy. We are providing 30 minute one-on-one evaluations and recommendations for home programs to up to 30 participants. For more information and to sign up please visit: http://signup.com/go/Nu1T4Q
You can also check out PT Day of Service here and follow on twitter (#PTDOS) to see how the day unfolds! http://ptdayofservice.com/
The American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) is also involved in hosting National Physical Therapy Month. This year the APTA’s focus is on it’s national public awareness campaign, #ChoosePT. This campaign lets consumers know about the risks of opioid use and that physical therapy is a safe, non-opioid alternative for managing pain.
I encourage you to check out educational resources provided by the APTA (www.apta.org) and Move Forward PT (http://www.moveforwardpt.com/Default.aspx). Learn all about how physical therapy can help you overcome pain without the use of opiods, improve mobility and maintain independence throughout your lifetime.

day-of-service