Ph101 Why is pooping so difficult?

toiletFiona McMahon, DPT

The number of Americans who deal with constipation issues is massive (4 million!)! It seems like every time I mention that I’m a pelvic floor physical therapist, another friend of a friend pulls me aside with bowel movement concerns. Why is it that so many people have issues? And more importantly – what can we do about it? This is the topic of our next Pelvic Health 101 seminar  on  March 30th at 7pm. 

Not only will constipation be discussed but other bowel conditions, such as irritable bowel syndrome, fecal incontinence, bloating and hemorrhoids will be addressed. The lecture will also go in depth on the role of fiber, water intake, toilet posture and pelvic floor muscles in having a successful bowel movement. You will even go home with easy techniques that you can implement immediately to help you get that smooth move! Don’t miss out on this FREE event – it’s a MUST for anyone who struggles on the porcelain throne. Seats are going fast!  Light snacks and refreshments will be served.

Register at pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com  today.

Location

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY

10017

Check out or upcoming courses!

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BPPT Health Tip: Best Positioning Tips for Optimal Bowel Movements

By Sarah Paplanus, DPT, PT

Are you among the 4 million Americans who suffer from constipation? Or the 1 in 5 American adults with Irritable Bowel Syndrome? Do you occasionally experience the pain and itchy feeling associated with hemorrhoids? If so, the Squatty Potty or similar stool may be the perfect addition to your bathroom! Even if you haven’t been diagnosed with any of these conditions, it is important to note that straining or holding your breath to complete a bowel movement is never normal and is usually a sign of dysfunction. Colorectal medical conditions can vary in their cause, in their presentation and in their severity, but your pelvic floor muscles will always be affected.

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Anatomy!

 

Your colon carries waste out of your body, and where the colon meets your rectum is called your anorectal angle. This anorectal angle is an important factor in continence.

Your pelvic floor muscles work together to support the rectum, change the anorectal angle and control opening/closing. One of your pelvic floor muscles (the puborectalis) forms a sling around your rectum and works to maintain the anorectal angle. If that muscle is tight, it can essentially “choke” your rectum and contribute to straining.

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What does squatting do?

Squatting straightens the anorectal angle and helps to relax the puborectalis muscle, which helps to facilitate emptying. It also decreases the amount of pressure in the abdomen, which has been shown to decrease the time and effort needed for defecation. This all helps to reduce excessive pressure and strain on your pelvic floor muscles. In cultures where squatting is still prevalent for defecation, such as parts of Asia and Africa, it has been found that bowel movements tend to be more complete and that there is a decreased incidence of colorectal dysfunctions such as hemorrhoids, constipation and hernias.

Why is straining bad?

A principle of elementary mechanics states that “any system exposed to excessive pressures ultimately sustains injury”.These injuries can be in the form of a hemorrhoid, a hernia, a muscle strain or a chronic pelvic floor dysfunction. Straining also increases your risk of the Valsalva maneuver, which is exhaling against a closed airway. This causes a sudden increase in intra-abdominal pressure which can cause abrupt changes in blood pressure.

Toilet Posture

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Using a squatty potty, stool, or even two yoga blocks can help you assume a “squat” position. Lean forward and rest your elbows on your knees. Take deep breathes in, using your diaphragm. Place your hands on your belly and feel your breathe fill up your abdomen. Keep your mouth open and jaw relaxed!

Other Strategies to Improve Bowel Health

  • Cardiovascular exercise
  • Proper nutrition (see our previous post on fiber!)
  • Make sure you are drinking enough water
  • Relaxation training, diaphragmatic breathing

 

What to do if you are still suffering?

If the above tips are not helping defecate regularly and comfortably, you may be suffering from pelvic floor dysfunction. Pelvic floor dysfunction can occur when the muscles of the pelvic floor become too tight, weak, or both to do their job properly. Physical Therapy can help! Visit us at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy to help better your BM’s.

PH101: Running to the bathroom, again?

By Fiona McMahon, DPT

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Do you find yourself with a full map of every public restroom along your daily commute in your head? Do you find yourself competing for the aisle seat at movies so you can sneak away to the bathroom? Does it hurt to go? Do you get up multiple times a night? If you answered yes to any of these questions, this week’s Pelvic Health 101 is for you.

On Thursday, March 23 at 7pm, join Stephanie Stamas, physical therapist at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy, for all of the ins and outs of bladder health. Learn how the bladder works, common bladder disorders, and practical tips for helping your bladder symptoms. Light refreshments will be served.

Register at pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com  today.

Location

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY

10017

pelvic-health-101-spring-2017

PH101: Something’s Wrong with my What?

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Image via PlayBuzz

On March 16, 2017 at 7pm we will be kicking off our spring semester of pelvic health education class, we call Pelvic Health 101 (PH101). In our first class we will be introducing you to the pelvic floor muscles, where they are, what they do, and how they relate to the health and function of your bowel, bladder, and sexual functioning. We will also be covering how things such as alignment, posture, muscle tone and nerves can affect your symptoms. This course is a great starting point to help you understand your pelvic floor and pelvic floor symptoms.

Please join us at our office at:

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY 10017
Register at: pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com

Here is our line up of this and future classes:

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Tightly Wound: A film chronicaling one women’s experience with vaginismus

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At Beyond Basics Physical Therapy, we treat a lot of conditions that limit or entirely prevent someone from having sex. One of those conditions is Vaginismus. The frustration and physical toll can be tiring for patients with this condition. One of the sentiments echoed time and time again by different patients, is how isolating the whole experience can be. Not many people talk about their sex life, let alone medical conditions affecting their ability to have sex. Shelby Hadden is looking to break the stigma by making her own film chronicling her experience with vaginismus. You can read her story and support her Kickstarter campaign here to fund her movie.

I was 24 and had never had sex. I had been dating Gadi for a few weeks and I couldn’t play defense to his advances any longer. It was time to tell him about my vaginismus.

Vaginismus was always the big black cloud of a secret looming over me.

But he surprised me. When I told him about it, he said, “I like you a lot, and we can figure this out. I still want to see you.” My heart soared. No guy I had dated up to that point had showed me an ounce of empathy, patience, or understanding. One guy walked out of my apartment, promised to call me, and never spoke to me again. Another laughed in my face and said, “That’s hilarious.” Finally, someone liked me as a whole person, not just the functionality of one body part.

The next day, he texted me this: “I’ve been thinking about what you shared with me the other night. I feel like it may be a bit more than I am ready for in a relationship. Sex is too important to me.”

He couldn’t even bother to consider what else we could do or ask how my progress in physical therapy was going. I couldn’t do it RIGHT THEN so I was “too much” for him – which in reality, in situations like these, it means that I wasn’t enough.

I was angry. I’ve been angry before – at other guys, at my body, at doctors, at Shonda Rhimes shows for making sex look so easy, fast, and fun – but this time I was absolutely furious. He gave me the reaction I had always hoped for, only to take it all back. I was just a vagina to him too. In addition, he never considered how important sex was to me. I had gone to a dozen doctors over the course of seven years. I had been going pelvic floor physical therapy every week for over a year. I had been using dilators every day for three years. No one was working harder to have sex than I was.

I needed to take action. As a filmmaker, the only way I knew how to take control over it was to make a film. So I wrote an essay, which I later turned into a script for a short animated film called, Tightly Wound.

Tightly Wound follows my journey from when I started my period and realized I couldn’t use a tampon. It chronicles the various doctors I saw and treatments I tried, the ways I hid my secret. I delve into my unsuccessful attempts at dating and explore what it means to be a virgin in today’s society.

It’s been a year since Gadi broke up with me. My essay has been published in BUST Magazine and I shared my experience at BedPost Confessions – an Austin, TX based storytelling series on sex, gender, and social change. I’ve assembled an extremely talented team of filmmakers to produce the film.

Animation is the perfect form for this film. It allows me to illustrate my internal thoughts and feelings in a metaphorical way rather than succumbing to the limitations of live-action. However, animation is an extremely time-consuming and labor-intensive process. The fastest my animator, producer, and friend, Sebastian Bisbal, can work is 5 seconds of animation per day!

 

We are raising $20,000 through Kickstarter. Kickstarter is a crowd-funding platform that allows people to support projects they believe in. Kickstarter is all-or-nothing – so if we don’t raise the $20,000, we don’t get any of it at the end of November.

It is estimated that 6% [ In a  study done by the World Health Organization, worldwide prevalence of pelvic pain has been estimated as being as high as 24%] of people with vaginas encounter pelvic pain/sexual dysfunction at some point of their lives. However, this is a difficult number to determine since shame and embarrassment keep so many people from seeking medical care.

Please join me in making this film and shining a light on pelvic pain/sexual dysfunction by donating to the Kickstarter. Thank you so much for your support!

Kickstarter link: http://kck.st/2dUTASv

Check out the trailer here: https://vimeo.com/188456092

Sincerely,

Shelby Hadden

 

Sources:

Latthe P, Latthe M, Say L, et al. WHO systematic review of prevalence of chronic pelvic pain: a neglected reproductive health  morbidity. BMB Public Health. 2006

Can Strengthening Your Pelvic Floor Fix Your Low Back?

By Riva Preil

Pain in the low back can be a real pain in the neck.  Unfortunately, low back pain (LBP) is all too common– an estimated 60-80% of people worldwide suffer from LBP at some point in their lives.  Traditional treatment for LBP includes lumbar strengthening exercises as well as various modalities, including ultrasonography and short wave diathermy.  It has been suggested that strengthening the bottom portion of the core, the pelvic floor muscles, would further assist in decreasing LBP due to its contribution to balance, stability, flexibility, and assistance with movement.

Researchers in China at the Pudong New District Gongli Hospital, decided to ascertain the validity of this hypothesis (Pelvic floor muscle exercise for chronic low back pain, Journal of International Medical Research).  In their randomized controlled trial, participants were assigned to a control group and an experimental group and underwent treatment for twenty four weeks. The control group received routine treatment, including lumbar strengthening exercises (ex. prone leg lifts, prone chest lifts, and bridging), ultrasonography, and short wave diathermy.  The experimental group received the same treatment as the control group as well as pelvic floor muscle (PFM) strengthening exercises, which included contracting the PFM for six seconds followed by relaxing the PFM for six seconds.  This was performed for 5 minutes in total during week one, 10 minutes during week two, 15 minutes during week three, and 20 minutes during weeks four to twenty four.  At the 6 month follow up, the intervention group participants reported much lower pain levels and had improved scores on their functional outcome measure (Oswestry Disability Index) compared to the control group.  The take home message is: don’t forget about your pelvic floor while strengthening your back!  If you need help learning how to properly activate and strengthen your PFM, please contact us at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy- we are here to help!

Let’s Review: Pelvic Floor Muscles

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By Mary Hughes, PT, DPT

Urogenital Triangle

Ischiocavernosus:
Primary Sexual Function: Obstructs venous return and maintains erection of clitoris

Bulbospongiosus:
Primary Sexual Function: initiates erection of the clitoris, also functions as a vaginal sphincter in females

Superficial Transverse Perineum: Stabilizes and strengthens the perineum

Levator Ani: functions as a unit.
Deep Pelvic Floor Muscles: Pubococcygeus,  Iliococcygeus, Puborectalis
Supports Pelvic Organs, assists with core stabilization, assists in orgasm in both men and women, moves the tail bone.
Inappropriate length tension relations or strength between any or all of these muscles can lead to pain, bladder/bowel dysfunction and or sexual dysfunction.