PH101: Something’s Wrong with my What?

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Image via PlayBuzz

On March 16, 2017 at 7pm we will be kicking off our spring semester of pelvic health education class, we call Pelvic Health 101 (PH101). In our first class we will be introducing you to the pelvic floor muscles, where they are, what they do, and how they relate to the health and function of your bowel, bladder, and sexual functioning. We will also be covering how things such as alignment, posture, muscle tone and nerves can affect your symptoms. This course is a great starting point to help you understand your pelvic floor and pelvic floor symptoms.

Please join us at our office at:

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY 10017
Register at: pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com

Here is our line up of this and future classes:

pelvic-health-101-spring-2017

Spring Pelvic Health 101 is Coming

Fiona McMahon, DPT, PT

Pelvic Health 101 is back with some old favorites like, “Something’s wrong with my what?” and “Why is pooping so difficult?” We have also added a new course on pediatric pelvic floor issues.

If you have questions, we have answers. Join us for lectures and question and answer opportunities with expert pelvic health physical therapists, childbirth educators, and nutritionists. Please reserve your spot early at pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com. Remember spots fill up quickly. As always, light refreshments will be served.

pelvic-health-101-spring-2017

Ph101 : Pelvic pain, meditation workshop with Ryanne Glasper, DPT & restorative yoga, calming down your pelvic floor

Fiona McMahon, DPT,

Enlightenment in nature

Earlier this summer, we discussed the nature of pain. In Putting Pain Into Context, We discussed how pain is comprised of two distinct components: the physical stimulus and how our brain interprets that stimulus. Both meditation and yoga are helpful techniques to help retrain how your brain responds to pain.

Join us on October 13th at 7pm for an introduction to both restorative yoga and meditation. Learn more about the science and try it out yourself with Anne Taylor, yoga instructor specializing in chronic pain and Ryanne Glasper, Physical Therapist and yoga instructor.  Come find out how these techniques may be helpful for you!

 

Register at pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com  today.

Location

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY

10017

Check out our upcoming courses:

Pelvic Health 101 Fall- (003)

PH101: Pain and Sexuality: Is it all in my head?

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By Fiona McMahon, DPT

Sex should feel good… really, really good. But when it doesn’t, you may start to wonder, what’s wrong with me? Am I broken? Am I a prude? Am I frigid? Painful sex isn’t something we talk about. No one would look at you twice if you walked into work complaining of pain in your elbow, but if you walk into work complaining about pain in you vagina or penis, you may end up having a meeting with HR.

On October 6th at 7pm, we at Beyond Basics are breaking down those taboos and having an educational seminar, followed by an optional question and answer session at the end. We will discuss the many causes of sexual pain and how physical therapy can help.  The event will be hosted by one of our therapists, Stephanie Stamas, DPT, ATC. Stephanie will give a detailed seminar about pelvic health and take time to clear up some common misconceptions many people have concerning their bodies and sexual function.

Please join us at our office at:

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY 10017
Register at: pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com

Here is our line up of this and future classes

Pelvic Health 101 Fall- (003)

Beyond Basics’s Pro-Bono Clinic for PT Day of Service!

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Victoria LaManna, DPT

October is around the corner! And a busy month for many. Whether you are getting back into the swing of school or work after summer vacation, preparing your Halloween costume or getting ready for all the upcoming holidays right around the corner – there is a lot going on!
This time of year is also an opportunity to do good and give back. October is National Physical Therapy Month, where physical therapists celebrate their amazing field of healing and getting people back to optimal function. In addition, many of the PT’s throughout the U.S. give back to their communities during this month. This year we are taking it up a notch. Physical therapists WORLDWIDE are getting involved for the second annual Global PT Day of Service Saturday, October 15th. Whether it is by hosting a pro-bono clinic, serving in a soup kitchen, participating in a 5k for a cause, or cleaning up a community garden – physical therapists globally as a profession are coming together to make a positive impact on the world around them.
At Beyond Basics, we have decided to host a pro-bono clinic Saturday, October 1st to give back to those in the New York City area who may not have insurance or access to physical therapy. We are providing 30 minute one-on-one evaluations and recommendations for home programs to up to 30 participants. For more information and to sign up please visit: http://signup.com/go/Nu1T4Q
You can also check out PT Day of Service here and follow on twitter (#PTDOS) to see how the day unfolds! http://ptdayofservice.com/
The American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) is also involved in hosting National Physical Therapy Month. This year the APTA’s focus is on it’s national public awareness campaign, #ChoosePT. This campaign lets consumers know about the risks of opioid use and that physical therapy is a safe, non-opioid alternative for managing pain.
I encourage you to check out educational resources provided by the APTA (www.apta.org) and Move Forward PT (http://www.moveforwardpt.com/Default.aspx). Learn all about how physical therapy can help you overcome pain without the use of opiods, improve mobility and maintain independence throughout your lifetime.

day-of-service

PH101: Running to the Bathroom Again?

By Fiona McMahon, DPT

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Do you find yourself with a full map of every public restroom along your daily commute in your head? Do you find yourself competing for the aisle seat at movies so you can sneak away to the bathroom? Does it hurt to go? Do you get up multiple times a night? If you answered yes to any of these questions, this week’s Pelvic Health 101 is for you.

On Thursday, September 29th at 7pm, join Stephanie Stamas, physical therapist at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy, for all of the ins and outs of bladder health. Learn how the bladder works, common bladder disorders, and practical tips for helping your bladder symptoms. Light refreshments will be served.

Register at pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com  today.

Location

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY

10017

Pelvic Health 101 Fall- (003)

Amy is Live with Integrated Pelvic Health!

Fiona McMahon DPT

amy2016What would you ask a pelvic floor physical therapy expert about exercise, or about the pelvic health as an athlete, if you had the chance? Don’t miss Amy Stein, founder of Beyond Basics Physical Therapy and author of Heal Pelvic Pain answer some commonly asked questions in a webinar hosted by well-renowned Jessica Drummond of Integrated Women’s Health Institute. Jessica is a nutritionist specializing in abdomino-pelvic health and dysfunction.  She will be interviewing Amy on the athlete and pelvic floor dysfunction, treatment paradigms, and practical tips for relieving the under active and the overactive pelvic floor.

Details:

Time: Friday, Sept 23, from 12-1pm EST.

Place: www.facebook.com/IntegrativePelvicHealth

Remember this interview can be replayed later if you cannot view it live.

 

 

Resources for Pelvic Pain:

Beyond Basics Physical Therapy: http://www.beyondbasicsphysicaltherapy.com/

 

Heal Pelvic Pain: http://www.healpelvicpain.com/

 

Integrated Women’s Health Institute: http://integrativewomenshealthinstitute.com/

 

Link to hear Amy and many other wonderful pelvic health experts speak in December about the female athlete and pelvic floor dysfunction:

https://km132.isrefer.com/go/WIWH/AStein/

 

PH101 Something’s Wrong with My What?

Fiona McMahon DPT, PT

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Image via PlayBuzz

 

On September 22, 2016 at 7pm we will be kicking off our fall semester of pelvic health education class, we call Pelvic Health 101 (PH101). In our first class we will be introducing you to the pelvic floor muscles, where they are, what they do, and how they relate to the health and function of your bowel, bladder, and sexual functioning. We will also be covering how things such as alignment, posture, muscle tone and nerves can affect your symptoms. This course is a great starting point to help you understand your pelvic floor and pelvic floor symptoms.

Please join us at our office at:

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY 10017
Register at: pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com

Here is our line up of this and future classes

Pelvic Health 101 Fall- (003)

September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month

Blue ribbon

Fiona McMahon PT, DPT

September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. Here at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy, we treat many men both before and after treatment for prostate cancer. We focus on restoring the health of the pelvic floor and tissue surrounding the prostate to restore normal sexual and urinary function. For more information about how physical therapy can help you or someone you love who is going through prostate cancer, read our blog on prostate cancer: https://beyondbasicsptblog.com/2015/04/07/physical-therapy-and-the-prostate/

Beyond Basics itself has an outstanding program in pre and post operative prostate care:

 

Beyond Basics Physical Therapy

Pre-op/Post op Prostatectomy Program

110 E 42nd Street, Suite #1504, NY, NY 10017

T: 212-354-2622

Beyond Basics Physical Therapy offers a unique and comprehensive rehabilitation program focused on the healthcare needs of people who have

  •      Incontinence or sexual dysfunction due to prostate surgery
  •      Pain and/or bladder retention, frequency or urgency due to prostate treatment (with or without surgery)

Our physical therapists that work with these clients have extensive training and knowledge in pelvic related issues.

Pre-operative: patient will be seen by a therapist to not only evaluate their prior function, but also give them exercises to do before and after surgery.  The evaluation will include:

  • Muscle strength testing including pelvic floor and lower extremities
  • Biofeedback evaluation using either internal rectal sensors or external anal sensors
  • Education on what to expect and things to do to optimize surgical outcomes
  • Overall posture evaluation

Post-operatively: patient will be seen 2-6 weeks after surgery. Treatment will include the following

  • Muscle re-education utilizing biofeedback
  • Bladder re-education/timed voiding
  • Postural education
  • Overall core stabilization when appropriate
  • Behavioral Modifications

We treat our patients for 60-75 minute sessions in private rooms and use state of the art biofeedback technology.   If you have specific questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.

As always, our programs are tailored to your specific needs.

Welcome Our New Intern, Denise!

By Fiona McMahon, DPT

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On the journey towards becoming a physical therapist, you have to take a lot of classes, days are long and the studying can be more than a little bit arduous. After you build up a sufficient base of knowledge in school, you get to round out your education by getting the experience to learn hands on in the clinic. Beyond Basics takes a Physical Therapy student every year with an expressed interest in the specialty of pelvic floor rehabilitation. We’ve had many students throughout the years, and both myself and Stephanie Stamas did our training here as students.

This year, our student is someone who is already close to the Beyond Basics family. Denise Small has been a Pilates instructor at BBPT for years and has played an integral role in helping our patients get back to their active lifestyle during and after treatment for pelvic floor dysfunction. When Denise decided to go to physical therapy school we were so excited, and we are so glad to have her back in the practice in her new role!

What made you want to go into physical therapy?
Physical therapy has been a constant part of my life. As a professional ballet dancer, I saw physical therapists who helped me recover from  injuries, maintain healthy joint and muscle mobility. While I was a professional dancer in NYC, I realized I needed a job on the side to make money while I wasn’t performing. I decided to get my Pilates certification because the schedule could be flexible and it was training that I had practiced as a dancer. My Pilates teachers were Certified Movement Analyst (CMAs) from the Laban school, and they approached Pilates training in a very unorthodox way. They were interested in using the Pilates method to help people with chronic pain issues and dancers who wanted to investigate their full movement potential. My teachers introduced me to really amazing PTs who went out of the box of traditional treatment, and using movement analysis to help heal chronic movement dysfunction.

Eventually, I came to the conclusion that I wanted to retire from dancing, which is a whole other story. I wanted to transition into something that I would be as passionate about as I was performing. I wanted something that would involve movement and movement analysis, but also something that had job stability, salary, health insurance, etc.  Add all those together and PT seemed like the obvious answer to me.

You have a pretty fascinating background outside of physical therapy, can you tell us what other work experiences you have had and how they shape you as a physical therapist?
Thank you! I think my experience in jobs that were centered around movement, dance and Pilates,  have influenced the way that I work with patients. My main concern is getting people to move more and to enjoy movement. We live in a three dimensional world with many different planes and directions to explore. I feel that most people only explore what’s directly in front of them, and maybe occasionally what’s behind them and what’s to their side. I believe that if people explored different heights, levels, and directions, they can break their habitual patterns and with them their chronic aches and pains.

I also believe that my undergraduate studies in psychology have helped me tremendously in my teaching skills. Realizing that there are many different personalities that are shaped by many different experiences, helps me to teach each patient in whatever way helps them best receive whatever information I have to offer. Basically, it taught me to be flexible to people’s different personalities and learning styles.

Pelvic floor rehabilitation is a pretty advanced specialty for someone to take on while they are still in PT school. What made you want to undertake such a challenge?
I’m glad you said that. It is a very difficult and complicated subject to explore for a PT student! But I think my age (I’m 36) and my life experience help me to be able to handle and understand all the different variables that go into having pelvic dysfunction. Also I am a survivor of pelvic pain and I received the benefits of what pelvic floor therapist are capable of. I, like a lot of the patients that come to BBPT, saw a few different doctors, body workers, and acupuncturists to try and relieve the pain I was feeling, but no one was able understand or help until I went to Physical Therapy. I want to be able to pay that gift forward and help others who are suffering from that type of pain.

Where did you go and what did you do for your other clinical experiences?
I have had some really wonderful experiences. At my school your affils are established by lottery, so I didn’t know what I was going to get. I was really lucky. I know not all students can say that. My first affil was at King’s County Hospital in East Flatbush, Brooklyn. It was in both inpatient and outpatient settings. I saw so many amazing cases there, working with people who had amputations, gunshot wounds, rare neurological conditions, the specific cases were fascinating and provided me with a wide breadth and depth of understanding of these conditions.

After that I was in an outpatient clinic. This clinic was the type of place you imagine when you think physical therapist’s office. I had a really great clinical instructor (CI), who was very knowledgeable and I appreciated having such a talented CI to guide me. After that, I was at Mt. Sinai on the Upper East Side in the Traumatic Brain Injury Unit. It was incredible. Again, I had such amazingly talented clinical instructors. I learned so much and I really enjoyed the patient population. In the inpatient setting with TBI patients, you are a part of restoring their basic functions like walking, sitting, standing. It was so humbling to watch these patients work so hard to achieve skills that we often take for granted. Mt Sinai was probably my most favorite of the three.

What advice do you have for an aspiring physical therapy student?
Honestly, I would say to establish a movement practice for yourself, meaning start a regime in which you can gain a deeper understanding of your own body, like yoga, Pilates, gyrotonics, tai chi, etc. If you have a deeper understanding of your own body, you can better understand how movement patterns can limit or enhance your patient’s functioning. With that knowledge not only can you have a better understanding of how to treat your patient, you can also be more empathetic toward their healing process.

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