Meet our new student, Volume II

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Julia Rosenthal, 3rd year Physical Therapy Student

Last week we introduced you to our student, Monica. This week we want to introduce you to our other student Julia. Read on to learn more about her journey.

1.) Where are you from, if you are from somewhere else, what brought you to NYC?

I am from just outside of Washington, DC. I came to NYC to study at NYU where I completed my undergraduate degree. I was in NYU’s Gallatin school of Individualized Study, where I created my own major in Culture and Philosophy of Healing. I also came to NYU because I wanted to remain active in the performing arts. While at NYU I continued to study vocal performance outside of school, and also sang a cappella and performed in student run drama companies.

2.) Did you work before PT school, if so what did you do?

Before PT school, I worked as an office manager at a psychology and psychiatry practice here in NYC called union square practice. I also continued to study voice, and sang backup for my friends’ various performances at the Bitter End downtown.

3.) What made you want to be a PT?

Though I started at NYU planning to progress to medical school, my major led me to take many courses on topics such as philosophy of medicine, anthropology of medicine, seminars on alternative therapies, and others that challenged me to think about what “healing” meant to me. I chose to veer away from becoming a medical doctor in favor of becoming a PT so that I could approach treatment in a more holistic way that allowed me to incorporate some of the theories on body work that resonated with me in my studies.

4.) What made you want to intern at Beyond Basics?

When I started PT school, I did not know what pelvic floor physical therapy was. I learned about it by accident when I mentioned my history of gastrointestinal issues to a professor, who pointed me in the direction of some resources on how pelvic floor physical therapists could help. Though I was able to resolve my own issues through nutritional changes, I was very intrigued by this area of PT, and began reading more about the many patient populations that specialists in this area can treat. I became involved in a research project with Dr. Cynthia Chiarello on pregnancy related pelvic girdle pain, and through that project my interest in this area of practice continued to grow.

Because of my interest in women’s health, I attended some of the Pelvic Health 101 sessions hosted at Beyond Basics. These sessions were fun and informative, but what I most appreciated was how comfortable the patients who attended felt with the therapists and the other people in the room. It made me realize how special Beyond Basics is, and since then I have been eager to have an experience working in this clinic and with the therapists here.

5.) What do you do for fun?

I like to see live music of all kinds – from opera to brass bands, to soul and funk, I love it all. As I mentioned, I sang a cappella and did musical theater in college, and I also studied jazz and opera with a vocal coach. I haven’t been doing much performing since starting PT school, but am looking forward to getting back to it after graduation. I also love all sorts of different exercise, including pilates, barre, weight training, and running.

6.) What piece of advice would you give to someone just starting in PT school?

The pace and workload in PT school can be stressful, but don’t let that discourage you! You and your peers will all be going through that adjustment together, and will all cope with it differently so use each other as a support system. Finding a balance between school and your social/recreational time is also important. Make sure to make time in your schedule for fun and relaxation. My escapes were going to the gym, going to concerts, going to the park when the weather was nice, and finding new places to go here in NYC that I had never been before. Spending a little time on yourself will keep you focused during study time, and prevent burnout.

Meet our new students! Volume I

Hello readers!

Monica

Monica LoConti, 3rd year PT student, Columbia University

Like doctors, nurses, and many other practitioners, physical therapists are required to do clinical rotations in order to gain experience and graduate from their program. Every year, Beyond Basics participates in hosting a final year physical therapy doctoral student to complete his or her clinical. This year is no different, except this year we took two! Both of our students Monica  and Julia are in their final year of their doctoral program at Columbia University. They were selected to join us because of their high academic achievement, interest in pelvic floor rehabilitation, and completion of pelvic floor continuing education classes. We are honored to have them and we want to take some time to introduce them to you.  Our first profile is that of Monica.

 

1.) Where are you from, if you are from somewhere else, what brought you to NYC?

I was born here in New York City  and then raised in Central New Jersey. For undergrad, I went to New York University  where I received my Bachelor of Fine Arts in Drama and have stayed in New York  to complete my doctorate at Columbia University.

2.) Did you work before PT school, if so what did you do?

I was a fitness trainer for 10 years before physical therapy school  school, working as a master trainer and spokesperson for New York Sports Clubs, as well as the Official Trainer for Subway Restaurants. I was also a contributing editor for Fitness Magazine. Currently, I train and teach yoga privately.

3.) What made you want to be a PT?

Although I loved working with healthy clients as a trainer, I always wished that I could help people more when they were injured. Physical therapy allows me to help people on that deeper level. Plus, I also always loved learning about the human body and wanted to go beyond the advanced personal training certifications I was collecting. Working with people has always been a part of my life and physical therapy allows me to continue connecting with individuals while I’m given an opportunity to improve their lives.

4.) What made you want to intern at Beyond Basics?

When I was volunteering at PT clinics before I began PT school, I had THREE different friends who needed pelvic PT at the same time. One friend needed rehab after surgery for endometriosis and also had dyspareunia. The second person had severe back and pelvic pain post-partum. The third friend was having urinary incontinence issues during the second trimester of her pregnancy. Fortunately, these friends invited me to come to their PT sessions to observe their treatments. I saw how much pelvic health rehabilitation improved my friends’ lives first hand. This helped me realize my desire to become a Pelvic Health therapist. Beyond Basics’ reputation for quality patient care is well known and I want to learn from the best. After attending seminars at Beyond Basics and experiencing the warm, welcoming, professional atmosphere, I had no doubt as to where I’d want to complete my final internship.

5.) What do you do for fun?

I’m the principal director for the Class of 2017 for Fairytale Physical Therapy, a group of physical therapy students that brings musical theatre to children in hospitals. Each show teaches the kids two choreographed dances that are composed of therapeutic exercises. Last week, I played Elsa at Blythedale Children’s Hospital and LOVED it (My husband jumped in and played Kristoff too!). My 4 year old dog Lola and I also compete in agility (think: jumping over hurdles and through tunnels). I also teach Pet CPR/First Aid and am a Reiki Master Teacher.

6.) What piece of advice would you give to someone just starting in PT school?

Physical therapy school is like trying to drink out of a fire hydrant. There’s only so much you can drink at once and that’s okay. You’ll have a whole career ahead of you to understand absolutely everything. Schedule time for yourself. Make time for your loved ones. Even if it’s only 30 minutes. You will be refreshed and efficient for school if you allow yourself to take breaks every once in awhile. Breathe. Focus. Believe in yourself.

PH101: Pain and Sexuality: Is it all in my head?

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By Fiona McMahon, DPT

Sex should feel good… really, really good. But when it doesn’t, you may start to wonder, what’s wrong with me? Am I broken? Am I a prude? Am I frigid? Painful sex isn’t something we talk about. No one would look at you twice if you walked into work complaining of pain in your elbow, but if you walk into work complaining about pain in you vagina or penis, you may end up having a meeting with HR.

On April 13th, at 7pm, we at Beyond Basics are breaking down those taboos and having an educational seminar, followed by an optional question and answer session at the end. We will discuss the many causes of sexual pain and how physical therapy can help.  The event will be hosted by one of our therapists, Stephanie Stamas, DPT, ATC. Stephanie will give a detailed seminar about pelvic health and take time to clear up some common misconceptions many people have concerning their bodies and sexual function.

Please join us at our office at:

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY 10017
Register at: pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com

Here is our line up of this and future classes

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BBPT Health Tip: Happy Baby Yoga Pose

Fiona McMahon PT, DPT

Guys! This is one of my favorite stretches ever. Both for myself personally and also for my patients. It’s called the happy baby pose, which comes from yoga. I mean, how cute is that. If you’ve ever seen a baby try and stick his feet in his mouth you know where the name comes from. This stretch is awesome because it stretches a ton of muscles at once, even the pelvic floor. It is an integral part of my stretching routine and I hope it becomes part of yours.

Muscles involved: Hamstrings, glute (butt) muscles, pelvic floor,

Stretch Type: Static: Best if performed after workouts on warm muscles. Exercise caution if stretching cold muscle, because unwarmed muscle doesn’t stretch as well as warmed up muscles.

Caution: If you feel pinching in your hips or pressure or discomfort under your kneecap, move your hand position to back of the thighs. If you still feel pain while attempting this modification, it is definitely time for a physical therapy appointment.

As always: No stretch should ever be painful. If a stretch is painful, stop and consult your physical therapist for modifications.

Directions: Lying on your back, grip your feet on the outside of your feet and bend your knees up towards your armpits. If this is too difficult, grasp your legs at the calves. Make sure that your neck is relaxed and hold for 60-90 seconds and repeat. Add deep breathing to enhance the relaxation. Enjoy!

 

Check out our student showing off her great happy baby pose!

Without Happy Ankles and Feet, We Don’t Have a Leg to Stand On!

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By, Amy Stein, DPT and Fiona McMahon, DPT

Our ankles function to help us do simple tasks from walking down the hall, climbing stairs to advanced tasks like cutting during a high level soccer game. Ankles need two things to do their job well. They need stability to allow us to transfer our weight onto them and mobility to absorb forces, like little shock absorbers when we move. A deficit in either one of these area’s can affect our ability to efficiently do certain activities and may cause pain in the foot and ankle itself or further up the leg.   As physical therapists we evaluate and treat ankle and foot issues to get the athlete or non-athlete back to optimal function.  

Get this, the foot has 26 bones, 33 joints and 100 muscles in it. There is a lot to look at and unfortunately, a lot that can go wrong with the foot. As physical therapists and especially here at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy, we like to use a systematic approach when evaluating the foot and ankle. We look at the foot’s range of motion (how far it can move), its strength, it’s ability to move well (motor control), and whether or not something’s not moving well when it comes to the soft tissue or the joint of the foot. If something’s up with any of these categories we open our tool box and treat using functional manual therapy, neuromuscular and postural re-education and self care!

Things we look at

  • In standing we assess the patient’s baby squat ( or plié, as our former dancers would call it) we are looking to see if there is an issue with the tissue of the foot’s ability to stretch and fold
  • Heel raise: We look at our patient’s’ ability to go up on their toes, aberrant or weird motions tell us about motor control, strength, and joint mobility.
  • Arm Swing: We promise this isn’t to make our patients look silly. It allows us to assess pronation and supination, which are super important motions of the foot.
  • End feel: We will passively move the patient’s foot and ankle through its range of motion to assess how the joint feels. It can tell us a lot about what’s wrong and where it’s coming from.
  • Palpation: We pride ourselves on our hands at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy. One of our PT’s calls it our “brain hands”. Palpation can reveal a ton about what’s going on in the foot.

These are all pretty basic first steps when assessing our patients. They are the starting point, but by no means the finish line. Once we get the big picture we will refine our examination to see what’s going on when our patients are doing their specific sport or activity. Once we get a good handle on  what’s going on we select the most appropriate techniques for our patients. Each patient is different and one basic protocol for everyone isn’t how we roll at BBPT. If you think your ankles or feet could use a little extra TLC, book an appointment today. To get the ball rolling, check out our blog written by our therapist, Denise Small . 

PH101: Running to the bathroom, again?

By Fiona McMahon, DPT

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Do you find yourself with a full map of every public restroom along your daily commute in your head? Do you find yourself competing for the aisle seat at movies so you can sneak away to the bathroom? Does it hurt to go? Do you get up multiple times a night? If you answered yes to any of these questions, this week’s Pelvic Health 101 is for you.

On Thursday, March 23 at 7pm, join Stephanie Stamas, physical therapist at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy, for all of the ins and outs of bladder health. Learn how the bladder works, common bladder disorders, and practical tips for helping your bladder symptoms. Light refreshments will be served.

Register at pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com  today.

Location

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY

10017

pelvic-health-101-spring-2017

March 6th is Lymphedema Awareness Day!

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Victoria LaManna PT, DPT, CLT

March 6th is Lymphedema Awareness Day! The lymph system carries the body’s waste products, dead pathogens, and water. Eventually these substances are cleared by the body. Problems can occur if the lymph system gets blocked and cannot clear these substances. Problems with the lymphatic system can cause swelling in affected limbs, and sometimes pain, as well as fibrotic changes in the skin.

You can be born with issues in your lymph system which can cause primary lymphedema or you can have damage to your lymph system because of surgery or radiation treatments, especially for breast cancer.

If you are living with lymphedema, try these tips from the Mayo Clinic to keep your limbs as healthy as possible:

  • Avoid injections, vaccinations, blood pressure monitoring, or IV’s on the affected limb
  • Don’t wear tight fitting clothing or jewelry
  • Avoid exposure to extreme temperatures, like hot baths, or saunas
  • Monitor your affected limb for signs of infection, and go to the doctor if you suspect infection

 

You can also check out our list of Self Care Tips 

Physical therapy can help manage lymphedema, which requires a very specialized lymphedema certified therapist.  At Beyond Basics Physical Therapy, we are lucky to offer lymphedema treatment with our own Certified Lymphedema Therapist, Victoria LaManna, PT, DPT, CLT . If you are interested in starting your lymphedema treatment journey, call and make an appointment with Victoria today!

For more reading on lymphedema, check out our previous blogs:

Lymph Drainage  Therapy for Breast Health at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy

Beyond Basics’, Victoria LaManna Receives Lymphatic Drainage Therapy Certification

 

Sources
Ness S. Living with lymphedema: Take precautions, get support. 2011. Mayo Clinic. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/cancer/expert-blog/lymphedema-management/bgp-20056387. Accessed February 10, 2017