Pilates Blog – Concentration

DeniseDenise Small, DPT

Every Wednesday the PTs at Beyond Basics are fortunate enough to listen to lectures from medical professionals who specialize in pelvic pain.  One of my favorite lectures was given by Melissa Farmer, PhD,  a clinical psychologist who specializes in how the brain changes overtime in response to chronic pain.  Melissa spoke about a lot of wonderful things that are being found through research; however the thing that was most interesting to me, was not only that the brain can change in response to persistent pain, but, that the brain can change back to its pre-pain functional self! One of the ways that this can be done is through focused movement.  That is, thoughtful, pain- free movement focused around the area that normally causes pain.  This revelation was very meaningful to me, as one of the basic Pilates movement principles is Concentration.  Pilates believed that if your mind was fully focused on performing the given exercise, you would only need to perform a few repetitions to feel the benefit.  This is very important for patients suffering from chronic pain, as they do not need to exercise to the point of pain to see the benefits. One of the exercises that exemplifies this belief is the Pelvic Clock. The pelvic clock both mobilizes and lengthens the pelvic floor muscles while simultaneously bringing tone to the abdomen. In addition, the movement is very small and specific and requires one’s full concentration. So, it is a great way to directly address the potential causes of pelvic pain, without causing pain in the process!

To begin, lie on your back with your knees bent. See, in your mind’s eye, the pelvis as the face of a clock with the top of your sacrum being 12 o’clock and your tailbone being 6 o’clock. Slowly move from each number as smoothly as possible, while seeing your sitz bones widen as your tailbone drops to 6 o’clock and your sitz bones narrow as you move to 12 o’clock. You can also combine the movement and breath as we have in our other Pilates blogs by inhaling as you move to 6 o’clock and exhaling as you move to 12 o’clock.  If you have any questions, have your PT take you through this exercise on your next visit, or come see me for a private Pilates session. Your Body and Brain will thank you.

Pilates Blog: Centering

Denise Small, PT, DPT

In today’s Pilates blog, we are going to discuss the basic principle of Centering.  Pilates used the word centering to refer to the “core” musculature.  He believed that all movements should radiate out of the core for maximum stability.  There is a lot of use of the word “core” in exercise literature. However, no one ever discusses what that actual means. In the Pilates method, the “core” refers to the diaphragm, the pelvic floor, the deep spinal muscles, and the transverse abdominus.  The transverse abdominus is a deep abdominal muscle that is attached to our pelvic bones in a horizontal fashion, from one hip bone to the other. One way to find these muscles is by breathing, as all the core muscles are attached to the diaphragm and ribs via fascial connections.

Try this exercise to find your “core.”  Lie on your back with your knees bent. If you need, you can have a small pillow under your head for support.  Now, imagine that you have a small, helium filled balloon in your abdomen behind your navel.  As you inhale see the balloon expand. As you exhale, imagine the balloon being hugged by your navel and your spine, simultaneously.  On your next exhale keep that image of hugging the balloon as it floats up into your ribcage.   This image incorporates the three dimensions of our torso, aka the “core” of our body.

ballon

There is no need to think of contracting individual muscles. Just keep this vision in mind and you will have a wonderfully functional core.  Go over this exercise with your PT in your next session, or come see me for a private session at Beyond Basics. Your body, and your core, will thank you!

Join Denise Small PT, DPT on July 6th for a Free Pilates Class

denise

Fiona McMahon, PT, DPT

Denise has not 1 but 2 hats here at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy. Not only is she a Doctor of Physical Therapy, specializing in functional manual therapy, orthopedics and pelvic floor conditions, she is also a certified Pilates instructor. Through the years she has worked to combine her passions to produce an outstanding Pilates program tailor made for individuals suffering from any pain condition and to help them become more functional and back to their exercise routine.

On July 6th at 7pm, Denise will be sharing her expertise with the public by offering a FREE gentle pilates class here at Beyond Basics. In this class participants will “ examine the interconnectedness of [their] own functional anatomy to move through and around [their] current fitness barriers”

To get a flavor of what Denise has to offer check out her blog posts bellow. If you are interested in attending the class, please RSVP here. Learn more about the Pilates program and the physical therapy program by clicking here.

Check Out Denise’s Blogs Here:

Pilates Blog- Rhythm- Coordination of Breath and Movement

The use of Breath in the Pilates Method 

Benefits of Pilates with Pain Conditions

Summer Movement Class

Beyond Basics Physical Therapy: Free Movement Classes are Here

Summer Movement ClassFiona McMahon PT, DPT

It’s summer in the city and maybe the air isn’t the only thing that’s a little stagnant? Could your workout routine use some updating? Are you itching to try something new like yoga, pilates, meditation, or tai chi? Have you been hesitant to try something new because you are nervous because of a past injury or pain condition? It’s time to take the leap and broaden your workout horizons with classes taught by practitioners with decades of combined experience in working with patients with acute and chronic pain conditions and sports and dance injuries. Take some time to read a little bit about this summer’s offerings and see if there is a right fit for you!

On July 6th at 7pm we will be offering gentle Pilates with Denise Small PT, DPT. Denise is a physical therapist at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy, who specializes in the treatment of orthopedic conditions and pelvic pain. She also is a certified Pilates instructor and combines both physical therapy and Pilates to help patients move throughout their world with increased strength and endurance, and with less pain. Denise is also a frequent contributor to the blog. Take some time to check out her recent articles,  on the Coordination of Breath and Movement, the use of Breath in in the Pilates MethodThe Benefits of Pilates with Pain Conditions, and check out our Pilates program here.

On July 13th at 7pm, Dr. Deborah Coady MD will be leading a gentle Tai Chi class designed to reduce stress, improve balance, and improve many other health conditions. Dr. Coady is a pioneer in the treatment of chronic pelvic pain and has a keen interest in the power of movement in aiding healing.

On July 20th at 7pm join Anne Taylor for Yoga. Anne teaches all over New York City and has worked with Beyond Basics Physical Therapy for years to offer private and group restorative classes for men and women with pelvic floor dysfunction.

Our last class is on July 27th at 7pm and will be lead by Ryanne Glasper PT, DPT. Ryanne will be offering a medication class to help you learn how to focus and calm the mind. Ryanne works at Beyond Basics specializing in orthopedics, dance medicine, and pelvic floor dysfunction. Ryanne is also a certified yoga instructor and has studied the Franklin Method through the Feldenkrais Institute.

If any of these classes interest you, click here to register today!

Pilates Blog- Rhythm- Coordination of Breath and Movement

PilatesDenise Small, PT, DPT

Today’s Pilates blog will focus on another basic movement principle of the Pilates method, Whole Body Movement.

In the last blog, I wrote about the importance of breathing three dimensionally, both expanding and contracting your abdomen and ribcage when breathing. Joseph Pilates wanted to help exaggerate these physiologic functions with movement, to help bring better awareness of these functions to one’s consciousness. He did that by coordinating both whole body movement and breathing. For example, when one inhales, the ribs and sternum move up and out, like a water pump or the handle on a bucket. You can feel this action by placing your hands on the outside of your ribcage, or on your sternum, as you inhale. When the ribs move up and out or the sternum lifts, the spine also extends because of the physical connection of the ribs into the spine. So, when Pilates gave a movement that involved spinal extension, like cow pose, he encouraged his students to inhale.

Conversely, when one exhales the opposite happens, and the ribs move in and down. When the ribs move in and down, this helps facilitate spinal flexion, because of the ribs physical connection to the spine. So, when Pilates gave a movement involving spinal flexion, he encouraged his students to exhale.

The result is inhalation with ribcage expansion and spinal extension, and exhalation with ribcage compression and spinal flexion. By coordinating the ribcage and spinal movement with the breath, you can maximize your air intake and expulsion. In addition, by coordinating your breath and movement, your body can more easily access its natural rhythms, calming the nervous system and promoting relaxation and healing.

Give it a try in your seat at work. Or come to Beyond Basics and visit me for a Pilates private!

The use of Breath in the Pilates Method

Denise Small PT, DPT

The following series of Pilates blog posts will focus on the principles that define the Pilates method.  Joseph Pilates developed his methodology using eight basic movement principles: whole body movement, breathing, balanced muscle development, concentration, control, centering, precision, and rhythm.  Today’s blog will focus on the principle of Breathing.

pilatesBreathing is a natural phenomenon that is performed thousands of times a day. Our daily intake of oxygen and expulsion of carbon dioxide is needed to cleanse our blood, and maintain the functioning of our body systems.  That being said, there are different ways to manipulate one’s breath to help facilitate certain physiological functions. For example, there have been many BBPT blog posts about diaphragmatic breathing, where one breathes into their abdomen to get a stretch of both the diaphragm and the pelvic floor muscles. Well, Pilates had his own approach to breathing, which was a variation on Diaphragmatic breathing.  Pilates approach to breathing was aimed at getting maximal air intake and release to give the body, what he called, “an internal shower” to rid the body of “toxins”. Pilates focused specifically on lateral expansion of the diaphragm, whereas traditional diaphragmatic breathing focuses on the vertical expansion of the diaphragm. In order to achieve this, Pilates encouraged maintaining the engaged tone of the abdomen, while breathing into the front, sides, and back of the ribcage. See the image below for further explanation.

 

Pilates- Ribcage/ Chest breathing versus Belly/Diaphragmatic breathing

This is an overly simplified view of the actual mechanics. However, both versions are very important. With the ability to differentiate between ribcage and diaphragmatic breathing you can offer your diaphragm a 3-dimensional stretch and the ability to work on abdominal contraction as well as endurance. If you have any questions you can ask them in the comments section. Or come visit me at Beyond Basics for a Pilates Private session!

Benefits of Pilates with Pain Conditions

By: Amy Stein, PT, DPT & Denise Small, PT, DPT
deniseDenise Small, Physical Therapist and resident Pilates instructor spoke on the differences between Pilates’ practices, and what aspects are important for her patients with chronic pelvic pain. Denise is third generation instructor of Joseph Pilates’ technique. She has also taken supplemental training courses with Eric Frankel and Thomas Myers, both well-known body workers and movement therapy practitioners.

Denise explores movement patterns in her patients that may have caused pain in the past, and are now labeled as something to fear. Patients try to avoid these movements; however, they are necessary for healthy functional mobility. Denise uses the Pilates method to explore these movements, and to make them pain free and more familiar. Denise is guided by Pilates’ 8 movements principles, which are the staples of Joseph Pilates’ methodology.

They are:

1. Whole Body movement- all structures are involved, even if they are not moving.

2. Breathing- Pilates refers to this as an internal shower, or a massage for your internal organs. This also helps coordinate your movement, using breath as your internal rhythm.

3. Balanced muscle development: concentric and eccentric movements happen in synchronicity with the use of the Pilates’ springs.

4. Concentration and focus: Required for all of the above to be performed together

5. Control- Pilates is not about repetitions and muscle bulk. Pilates is about Form and coordination of all the movement principles. If all of the movement principles are being incorporated, one needs only to perform 8-10 repetitions of each exercise for maximum benefit.

6. Centering- Pilates heals the mind and body, by bringing your attention to your core. That is: the abdominal wall, the diaphragm, the pelvic floor, and the deep spinal extensors.

7. Precision- If the movement is specific, there is very little room for error

In addition to being guided by the movement principles, Denise has a few staples of her own, that she uses to frame her sessions. First, Denise believes that you need to have tissue mobility before stability. For example, one needs to be able to move their abdominal muscles before they can begin strengthening their abdominal muscles. If a patient’s abdominal wall is hard, then it is not necessarily strong. A strong abdomen is a part of a strong core. A strong core requires fluid coordination of the diaphragm, pelvic floor, the spinal extensors, and the abdominal wall with movement. This lack of coordination may be observed when a patient is performing an abdominal strengthening exercise. Does the patient hold their breath? Are they tucking in the tailbone and gripping their pelvic floor muscles? Does their abdomen bulge? Many of these compensations can be avoided with the use of breath while performing more subtle core exercises, like marching, before progressing to more advanced exercises.

Second, Denise always highly recommends rolling out your patient’s feet before doing any mat or reformer work. Studies have shown that the fascia of your feet is directly connected to the fascia of your core, pelvis, and spine. So, if you release your plantar fascia, you can release restrictions all the way through your legs and torso. Once the muscles and fascia of your feet are more pliable one can better align their skeleton, from the domes of their feet to the roof of their mouth.

Lastly, Denise likes to use as few cues as possible to not confuse or overwhelm the patient. In addition, her cues are oriented around the bones. Bones are easier for patients to visualize, and focusing on the bones alleviates the possibility of dysfunctional muscle recruitment; i.e. gripping. For example, for pelvic floor muscle tightness and pain conditions, Denise cues widening the sits bones with squatting and inhalation. The patient/client needs to work on letting go of the muscles and the sits bones, while we work on eccentric control. To learn more about Denise, visit her bio and our Pilates program .  Also see her recently published health tip to get started.