PH101: Something’s Wrong with my What?

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Image via PlayBuzz

On March 16, 2017 at 7pm we will be kicking off our spring semester of pelvic health education class, we call Pelvic Health 101 (PH101). In our first class we will be introducing you to the pelvic floor muscles, where they are, what they do, and how they relate to the health and function of your bowel, bladder, and sexual functioning. We will also be covering how things such as alignment, posture, muscle tone and nerves can affect your symptoms. This course is a great starting point to help you understand your pelvic floor and pelvic floor symptoms.

Please join us at our office at:

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY 10017
Register at: pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com

Here is our line up of this and future classes:

pelvic-health-101-spring-2017

September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month

Blue ribbon

Fiona McMahon PT, DPT

September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. Here at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy, we treat many men both before and after treatment for prostate cancer. We focus on restoring the health of the pelvic floor and tissue surrounding the prostate to restore normal sexual and urinary function. For more information about how physical therapy can help you or someone you love who is going through prostate cancer, read our blog on prostate cancer: https://beyondbasicsptblog.com/2015/04/07/physical-therapy-and-the-prostate/

Beyond Basics itself has an outstanding program in pre and post operative prostate care:

 

Beyond Basics Physical Therapy

Pre-op/Post op Prostatectomy Program

110 E 42nd Street, Suite #1504, NY, NY 10017

T: 212-354-2622

Beyond Basics Physical Therapy offers a unique and comprehensive rehabilitation program focused on the healthcare needs of people who have

  •      Incontinence or sexual dysfunction due to prostate surgery
  •      Pain and/or bladder retention, frequency or urgency due to prostate treatment (with or without surgery)

Our physical therapists that work with these clients have extensive training and knowledge in pelvic related issues.

Pre-operative: patient will be seen by a therapist to not only evaluate their prior function, but also give them exercises to do before and after surgery.  The evaluation will include:

  • Muscle strength testing including pelvic floor and lower extremities
  • Biofeedback evaluation using either internal rectal sensors or external anal sensors
  • Education on what to expect and things to do to optimize surgical outcomes
  • Overall posture evaluation

Post-operatively: patient will be seen 2-6 weeks after surgery. Treatment will include the following

  • Muscle re-education utilizing biofeedback
  • Bladder re-education/timed voiding
  • Postural education
  • Overall core stabilization when appropriate
  • Behavioral Modifications

We treat our patients for 60-75 minute sessions in private rooms and use state of the art biofeedback technology.   If you have specific questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.

As always, our programs are tailored to your specific needs.

Have a Healthy Prostate

By Roseanne Schoen

In acknowledgement of Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, here are a few more ways to stay prostate-healthy!

Schedule an Annual Prostate Exam: Annual prostate exams can help catch problems early and can diagnosis and treat preexisting problems such as an enlarged prostate, prostatitis, and prostate cancer.

Maintain Your Ideal Weight: If you need to lose weight do it. Studies showed that men with 43 inch waists or greater were 50% more likely than normal weight men to suffer from prostate enlargement. Eat adequate servings of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and healthy fats. Limit your intake of salt and processed foods.

Abstain from Alcohol: Studies have shown that beer raises the body’s prolactin levels (prolactin increases the uptake of testosterone into the prostate and this increased testosterone converts into increased levels of DHT), and that the higher the alcohol intake the more likely a man was to suffer from prostate enlargement. Caffeine and sugar should also be avoided or moderated.

Avoid Drug and Pesticide Exposure: Drugs and pesticides may increase the 5-alpha-reduction of steroids and may put you at a higher risk for cancer.

Keep Cholesterol Down: Free radical damaged cholesterol may play a role in stimulating the prostate cell formation that may cause an enlarged prostate so it is important to keep your cholesterol level within a healthy range.

Exercise!

Promising Prostate Progress

By Riva Preil

Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of deaths amongst males in the United States, and nearly 30,000 men die annually from the disease.  Most of these deaths occur by the time the disease has metastasized (spread) to the bone.  Approximately 250,000 new cases are diagnosed each year. Clearly, the disease affects a significant portion of the male population, and it is no wonder that researchers have been focusing time, energy, and financial resources to search for the most effective treatments.  To date, the two most popular forms of treatment are with radiation therapy or prostatectomy (removal of the prostate gland).

Fortunately, recent research has proven that a new type of radiation therapy can increase the average life expectancy of men with advanced prostate cancer. The new medication Xofigo was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in May 2013. It involves emission of alpha particles from radium 223 instead of the smaller and less energetic beta particles (that were emitted from previous radiation treatment, strontium).  Dr. Chris Parker of London, lead author of the study which was published in the New England Journal of Medicine, concluded that men who were treated with Xofigo saw the average survival time increase from eleven months to fifteen months, an approximate 30% improvement.  Furthermore, men who were treated with the new drug experienced fewer side effects, such as muscle weakness and bone pain.

The benefits of Xofigo may not end with the prostate!  In fact, it may help treat bone metastases related to breast cancer and other cancers, according to Dr. Robert Dreicer of the Cleveland Clinic.  Future research is indicated to further assess the potential benefits offered by Xofigo.

To learn more about this study and Xofigo, please refer to this article in the New York Times from July 17, 2013.

September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month!

By Roseanne Schoen

According to the American Cancer Society, approximately 217,730 men will learn they have prostate cancer and more than 32,050 men will die from the disease this year.
Today, 1 man in 6 will get prostate cancer during his lifetime, but only 1 man in 34 will die of this disease. More than 2 million men in the United States who have been diagnosed with prostate cancer at some point are still alive today. When detected during these earliest stages the 5-year survival rate is close to 100%. In an effort to educate and inform the public, the American Cancer Society recognizes September as National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. Here are some tips to prevent prostate cancer:

1.     Keep a healthy weight and exercise regularly.

2.     Eat more fruits and vegetables. Tomatoes, watermelons, pink grapefruits, guava and papaya contain lycopene, a powerful antioxidant. Cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, bok choy and kale also are good choices.

3.     Let your doctor know if you have a family history of prostate cancer. Having a father or brother with prostate cancer more than doubles a man’s risk of developing this disease.

4.     Include more soy in your diet from sources such as tofu, soy nuts or soy flour or powders.

5.     Don’t smoke.

6.     Eat more selenium-rich foods such as wheat germ, tuna, herring and other seafood and shellfish, beef liver, kidney, eggs, sunflower and sesame seeds, cashews, mushrooms, garlic and onions. Selenium reduces risk of prostate cancer.

7.     Get a PSA blood test and digital rectal exam annually, beginning at age 50. Men at high risk, such as African American men or men with a strong family history of prostate cancer should begin testing at age 45.