PH101 Potty Issues with Kiddos

PottyFiona McMahon PT, DPT

Did you know kids can suffer from pelvic floor dysfunction too? Pelvic floor dysfunction in children can result in pain, bladder holding or constipation, embarrassing soiling accidents, frequent nighttime accidents, as well as trouble going potty. For most kids, there is an underlying physical component that needs to be addressed by an expert pediatric pelvic floor physical therapist.

It is very upsetting for a parent, guardian or caregiver to see a child suffer with pain or embarrassment, but there is so much that can be done to help out children with these issues. We use positive charts to develop short term and achievable goals to reinforce  behaviors and steps towards healthy toileting. Simple techniques like using the improving toilet posture, practicing deep breathing with bubbles, using a timer to assist in times voiding, educating the parent/guardian/caregiver on the colon massage, developing a core stability and stretching program, and more can go a long way towards improving bowel and bladder symptoms.

If your child is suffering from urinary or fecal accidents, bed wetting, skidmarks, or painful defecation, join me on May 11th, at 7pm , to discuss pelvic floor dysfunction in children, common conditions affecting pottying, and practical tips you can use to make potty time easier.

This is our last Pelvic Health 101 class of the spring series. We want to thank for an awesome season! Keep your eyes on the blog for the Fall’s PH101 classes!

RSVP: pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com

BPPT Health Tip: Best Positioning Tips for Optimal Bowel Movements

By Sarah Paplanus, DPT, PT

Are you among the 4 million Americans who suffer from constipation? Or the 1 in 5 American adults with Irritable Bowel Syndrome? Do you occasionally experience the pain and itchy feeling associated with hemorrhoids? If so, the Squatty Potty or similar stool may be the perfect addition to your bathroom! Even if you haven’t been diagnosed with any of these conditions, it is important to note that straining or holding your breath to complete a bowel movement is never normal and is usually a sign of dysfunction. Colorectal medical conditions can vary in their cause, in their presentation and in their severity, but your pelvic floor muscles will always be affected.

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Anatomy!

 

Your colon carries waste out of your body, and where the colon meets your rectum is called your anorectal angle. This anorectal angle is an important factor in continence.

Your pelvic floor muscles work together to support the rectum, change the anorectal angle and control opening/closing. One of your pelvic floor muscles (the puborectalis) forms a sling around your rectum and works to maintain the anorectal angle. If that muscle is tight, it can essentially “choke” your rectum and contribute to straining.

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What does squatting do?

Squatting straightens the anorectal angle and helps to relax the puborectalis muscle, which helps to facilitate emptying. It also decreases the amount of pressure in the abdomen, which has been shown to decrease the time and effort needed for defecation. This all helps to reduce excessive pressure and strain on your pelvic floor muscles. In cultures where squatting is still prevalent for defecation, such as parts of Asia and Africa, it has been found that bowel movements tend to be more complete and that there is a decreased incidence of colorectal dysfunctions such as hemorrhoids, constipation and hernias.

Why is straining bad?

A principle of elementary mechanics states that “any system exposed to excessive pressures ultimately sustains injury”.These injuries can be in the form of a hemorrhoid, a hernia, a muscle strain or a chronic pelvic floor dysfunction. Straining also increases your risk of the Valsalva maneuver, which is exhaling against a closed airway. This causes a sudden increase in intra-abdominal pressure which can cause abrupt changes in blood pressure.

Toilet Posture

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Using a squatty potty, stool, or even two yoga blocks can help you assume a “squat” position. Lean forward and rest your elbows on your knees. Take deep breathes in, using your diaphragm. Place your hands on your belly and feel your breathe fill up your abdomen. Keep your mouth open and jaw relaxed!

Other Strategies to Improve Bowel Health

  • Cardiovascular exercise
  • Proper nutrition (see our previous post on fiber!)
  • Make sure you are drinking enough water
  • Relaxation training, diaphragmatic breathing

 

What to do if you are still suffering?

If the above tips are not helping defecate regularly and comfortably, you may be suffering from pelvic floor dysfunction. Pelvic floor dysfunction can occur when the muscles of the pelvic floor become too tight, weak, or both to do their job properly. Physical Therapy can help! Visit us at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy to help better your BM’s.

Stool Science

By Riva Preil

You loved her talk about anatomy two weeks ago and you couldn’t get enough about bladder chatter last Tuesday.  Well, guess what… Stephanie Stamas is back for more! On Tuesday, October 28th, at 7 PM, Stephanie will teach the next class in the series of The School of Pelvic Health entitled Why is Pooping So Difficult.

This class is a MUST for anyone who lives, breaths, eats, and digests on planet earth.  Yes, that includes you.

  • Have you ever wondered what is the proper position for passing bowel movements?
  • Ever wonder how sitting on the toilet affects the pelvic floor muscles, the muscles that need to relax in order to pass a bowel movement?
  • Also, how much water should an individual drink and how much fiber should one eat?  Heck, what IS fiber and what foods are good sources of fiber?
  • Why do I have to strain to pass a bowel movement?  Is that normal?

Don’t let these questions bother you any longer.  Stephanie will address these and many other related issues.  She will explain the proper muscle coordination required to pass a bowel movement and she will teach practical techniques that can be implemented immediately.

We look forward to meeting and greeting you on Tuesday evening, and we hope you continue to enjoy Stephanie’s classes!

Cracking the Colon Color Code

By Riva Preil

Recently, I had the opportunity to discuss the medical information that can be gleaned from one’s urine (refer to What Version is Your Urine? April 11, 2014).  Today, I have a similar opportunity to do so regarding … bowel movements!  Warning: If you are enjoying my blog while eating your lunch, or if you are about to do so, you might want to hold off until you have finished eating.  Just thought you would appreciate that public service announcement.

That being said…stool is the body’s garbage.  Waste products, dead blood cells, bile, gastrointestinal bacteria, and other non-absorbable items (remember that time that you accidentally swallowed that penny?  Yep, that’s what I’m referring to) are excreted in one’s bowel movements. Stool is covered in a mucus sheath to help it slide out of the body.  Those who don’t drink enough water may experience straining and discomfort while passing a bowel movement, because mucus production is dependent on adequate water intake (8 cups a day).

The color of one’s stool may provide valuable information regarding one’s health.

  • GREEN stool may indicate sensitivity to Anise oil, an ingredient found in some licorice candies.  It may also indicate that stool is passing through the large intestine (aka colon) too rapidly for bile (which aids in the digestion of fats) to be fully broken down.  This may also occur when one consumes large amounts of green leafy vegetables and/or artificial food colorings.
  • WHITE or clay colored stool may indicate a bile duct obstruction, perhaps by a gallstone, enlarged lymph node, or scarring of the bile duct.  Other symptoms that accompany bile obstruction include abdominal pain, dark urine, and jaundice.
  • YELLOW stool that smells like sour eggs and appears greasy may indicate excessive amounts of fat in the stool. This is a common symptom of Celiac Disease, during which bile does not properly break down fat
  • BLACK stool could be a result of too much Pepto-Bismol, black licorice, or even beer.  However, if the stool is black, sticky, and foul smelling, it may also be a result upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding.  One should seek medical attention if they experience the aforementioned symptoms.
  • BRIGHT RED stool, as with black stool, may simply be the result of overconsumption of certain foods (ex. beets, cranberries, tomato juice, red gelatin, or Kool-Aid)…or it may indicate lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding.  Once again, one should consult with their physician if they suspect anything “out of the ordinary.”

For more information check out this article, “What Your Poop Is Trying to Tell You,” on Gizmodo!