PH101: Running to the bathroom, again?

By Fiona McMahon, DPT

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Do you find yourself with a full map of every public restroom along your daily commute in your head? Do you find yourself competing for the aisle seat at movies so you can sneak away to the bathroom? Does it hurt to go? Do you get up multiple times a night? If you answered yes to any of these questions, this week’s Pelvic Health 101 is for you.

On Thursday, March 23 at 7pm, join Stephanie Stamas, physical therapist at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy, for all of the ins and outs of bladder health. Learn how the bladder works, common bladder disorders, and practical tips for helping your bladder symptoms. Light refreshments will be served.

Register at pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com  today.

Location

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY

10017

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PH101: Something’s Wrong with my What?

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Image via PlayBuzz

On March 16, 2017 at 7pm we will be kicking off our spring semester of pelvic health education class, we call Pelvic Health 101 (PH101). In our first class we will be introducing you to the pelvic floor muscles, where they are, what they do, and how they relate to the health and function of your bowel, bladder, and sexual functioning. We will also be covering how things such as alignment, posture, muscle tone and nerves can affect your symptoms. This course is a great starting point to help you understand your pelvic floor and pelvic floor symptoms.

Please join us at our office at:

110 East 42nd Street, Suite 1504

New York, NY 10017
Register at: pelvichealth-101.eventbrite.com

Here is our line up of this and future classes:

pelvic-health-101-spring-2017

Exercise, The Female Athlete, and the Pelvic Floor

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Fiona McMahon PT, DPT

In honor of National Women’s Health and Fitness Day ,September  28, we are exploring the benefits of regular exercise for women as well as addressing some pitfalls (pelvic floor included), that female athletes can fall into too. It is far too often that women find themselves sidelined from their favorite sports and fitness routines secondary to issues like orthopedic or sports-related pain or incontinence. Although all the issues outlined in this blog can occur to both genders, many of these conditions are more likely to happen to females, secondary to their pelvic structure and physiology.

 

Exercise and Its Benefits

heart-health

 

The benefits of exercise are too numerous to discuss every single one here and span the physical to the emotional. There are a number of conditions that have profound effects on the health of women nationwide. Let’s explore some of exercise’s specific benefits for these conditions together.

Heart Disease

According to the American Heart Association, Heart disease is the number one killer of women in the US and is responsible for 1 in 3 female deaths.  Exercise and a healthy lifestyle have been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease by 80%. The American Heart Association recommends 150 minutes of moderate activity or 75 minutes of vigorous activity to stave off heart disease.

Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is unfortunately a common affliction among white and asian urban dwelling females.  It is characterized by reduced bone density, which causes bones to be fragile and increases the risk of fracture in individuals that have osteoporosis. Exercise has been shown to be helpful in both reducing the risk of osteoporosis as well as improving the bone mineral density of those who already have osteoporosis.

Other benefits of regular exercise include:

  • Reduced risk of diabetes
  • Reduced risk of colon cancer
  • Improved psychological well being
  • Maintenance of healthy body weight

Remember, it is important to consult with a trained healthcare professional before commencing a new fitness routine.

 

The Female Athlete Triad- Aka the Downside

All things in moderation. Although exercise is beneficial it is easy to over do it. It becomes easier to slip into an unhealthy relationship with exercise, especially in women who are training at elite levels, have eating disorders, or body dysmorphia issues.

The  female athlete triad consists of three disorders that can have severe health consequences in both the near and long term. The three disorders that compose the female athlete triad are:femaletriad

  1. Disordered Eating
  2. Ammenorrhea (absent periods or periods that are irregular)
  3. Osteoporosis

The female athlete triad is often attributed to the expectation that women keep a slender appearance. Girls and women who have body image issues may be at greater risk. The female athlete triad is dangerous and has the potential to be deadly. Osteoporosis can result  in fractures and eating disorders can seriously impact fertility, or even throw off the delicate balance of electrolytes in their system, putting them at serious risk for a cardiac event.

Warning signs of the female athlete triad include:

  • Yellowing of skin
  • Stress fractures
  • Rapid fluctuations in weight
  • Development of baby hair over skin
  • Daily vigorous exercise to an excessive level

 

The female athlete triad requires a multidisciplinary approach from medical, to psychological to nutrition.  It is important for someone who is suffering from the female athlete triad to seek help in order to safeguard their health and emotional well being.

 

Athletics and The Pelvic Floor

d14e2-tipsforahappyandhealthyvaginaLike any muscle, the pelvic floor can get fatigued, strained, or even go into a painful muscle spasm. The thing about the pelvic floor muscles, is that they have to work in almost every athletic pursuit. They work in partnership with the multifidus of the back, the transverse abdominus of the belly, and the diaphragm to stabilize and protect your spine. They also contract with every step during running activities to prevent your pelvic organs from dropping down in your pelvic cavity and to prevent urinary and or fecal leakage. Things can go wrong when the pelvic floor or other core muscles don’t function properly. Athletes’ pelvic floors can become tight and restricted, preventing closure of sphincters and support of pelvic organs. They may go into spasm from working too hard to stabilize the spine, if one of the other core muscles is failing to pull its weight.

Recently there has been more work to investigate the link between athletes and pelvic floor dysfunction. A recent study found that self identified female triathletes suffer from urinary and fecal incontinence at rates as high as 37.4% and 28.0%, respectively. Similar results were also found on a group of runners. Of the triathletes studied, nearly a quarter of them fit the criteria for female athlete triad, discussed earlier in this post.

Does this mean you have to give up your penchant for running? NO! (hellooooooo the author of this post is a runner), but if you find yourself experiencing incontinence, pain, constipation, and or painful sex, something is wrong and you must intervene in order to protect your long term health and your ability to participate in your favorite sport. At Beyond Basics Physical Therapy we combine orthopedic and pelvic expertise to help return athletes to their sports in a more functional and less painful condition. We relax tight muscles of the pelvic floor, train the core, including the pelvic floor if needed, to do its fair share, and return normal postural and structural alignment to our patients. We work one on one with you to develop a home exercise plan to help you reach your goals and prevent a reoccurrence of your pelvic floor or core disorder.

 

Please come see us so you can return to your sport in a better and more optimal condition than when you started: http://www.beyondbasicsphysicaltherapy.com/

 

 

Sources

American College of Sports Medicine. Information on … the female athlete triad. https://www.acsm.org/docs/brochures/the-female-athlete-triad.pdf. Accessed September 19, 2016

 

American Heart Association. Facts About Heart Disease in Women.  2016. https://www.goredforwomen.org/home/about-heart-disease-in-women/facts-about-heart-disease/. Accessed: September 6, 2016

 

Bø, K. Urinary incontinence, pelvic floor dysfunction, exercise and sport. Sports Medicine, 34(7), 451-464. 2004.

 

Illinois Department of Public Health: Women’s Health. Facts about  women’s wellness exercise . http://www.idph.state.il.us/about/womenshealth/factsheets/exer.htm Accessed: September 13 2016

 

Loyola University Health System. “Female triathletes at higher risk for pelvic floor disorders.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 August 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/08/160823165743.htm>.

 

Stampfer M, Hu F, Manson J, et al. Primary prevention of coronary heart disease in women through diet and lifestyle. The New England Journal of Medicine. 2000; 343(1). 16- 22
Todd J, Robinson R. Osteoporosis and exercise. Postgrad Med J. 2003; 79:320-23

Beyond Basics’s Pro-Bono Clinic for PT Day of Service!

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Victoria LaManna, DPT

October is around the corner! And a busy month for many. Whether you are getting back into the swing of school or work after summer vacation, preparing your Halloween costume or getting ready for all the upcoming holidays right around the corner – there is a lot going on!
This time of year is also an opportunity to do good and give back. October is National Physical Therapy Month, where physical therapists celebrate their amazing field of healing and getting people back to optimal function. In addition, many of the PT’s throughout the U.S. give back to their communities during this month. This year we are taking it up a notch. Physical therapists WORLDWIDE are getting involved for the second annual Global PT Day of Service Saturday, October 15th. Whether it is by hosting a pro-bono clinic, serving in a soup kitchen, participating in a 5k for a cause, or cleaning up a community garden – physical therapists globally as a profession are coming together to make a positive impact on the world around them.
At Beyond Basics, we have decided to host a pro-bono clinic Saturday, October 1st to give back to those in the New York City area who may not have insurance or access to physical therapy. We are providing 30 minute one-on-one evaluations and recommendations for home programs to up to 30 participants. For more information and to sign up please visit: http://signup.com/go/Nu1T4Q
You can also check out PT Day of Service here and follow on twitter (#PTDOS) to see how the day unfolds! http://ptdayofservice.com/
The American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) is also involved in hosting National Physical Therapy Month. This year the APTA’s focus is on it’s national public awareness campaign, #ChoosePT. This campaign lets consumers know about the risks of opioid use and that physical therapy is a safe, non-opioid alternative for managing pain.
I encourage you to check out educational resources provided by the APTA (www.apta.org) and Move Forward PT (http://www.moveforwardpt.com/Default.aspx). Learn all about how physical therapy can help you overcome pain without the use of opiods, improve mobility and maintain independence throughout your lifetime.

day-of-service

Amy is Live with Integrated Pelvic Health!

Fiona McMahon DPT

amy2016What would you ask a pelvic floor physical therapy expert about exercise, or about the pelvic health as an athlete, if you had the chance? Don’t miss Amy Stein, founder of Beyond Basics Physical Therapy and author of Heal Pelvic Pain answer some commonly asked questions in a webinar hosted by well-renowned Jessica Drummond of Integrated Women’s Health Institute. Jessica is a nutritionist specializing in abdomino-pelvic health and dysfunction.  She will be interviewing Amy on the athlete and pelvic floor dysfunction, treatment paradigms, and practical tips for relieving the under active and the overactive pelvic floor.

Details:

Time: Friday, Sept 23, from 12-1pm EST.

Place: www.facebook.com/IntegrativePelvicHealth

Remember this interview can be replayed later if you cannot view it live.

 

 

Resources for Pelvic Pain:

Beyond Basics Physical Therapy: http://www.beyondbasicsphysicaltherapy.com/

 

Heal Pelvic Pain: http://www.healpelvicpain.com/

 

Integrated Women’s Health Institute: http://integrativewomenshealthinstitute.com/

 

Link to hear Amy and many other wonderful pelvic health experts speak in December about the female athlete and pelvic floor dysfunction:

https://km132.isrefer.com/go/WIWH/AStein/

 

Spring Pelvic Health 101 Classes are About to Start!

Come Learn With Us! Free Pelvic Health 101 Classes at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy!

By Fiona McMahon, DPT

It’s that time of year again, temperatures are rising, the days are getting longer, and we at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy are gearing up and getting ready to start up our hugely successful Pelvic Health 101(PH101) classes for the spring and we couldn’t be more excited!

Our upcoming Pelvic Health 101 Course is the third in our series of PH101 courses. Our courses cover a variety of topics from male and female sexuality, bowel and bladder health, nutrition, as well as complimentary medicine for pelvic floor dysfunction. In this blog we will sit down with one of Beyond Basics’ Senior Physical Therapists and the creative force behind our Pelvic Health 101 Classes, Stephanie Stamas, to get more information on this wonderful resource.

FM: Why did you begin PH101?
SS: I began the Pelvic Health 101 seminar series last fall out of a desire to help more people. There are a lot of people out there who have consistently been told there is nothing wrong with them, it is all in their head or they should just get over it. I wanted to put together an educational series that would validate people’s suffering as well as give them tools to heal and return to a normal life. I believe that information is power, and that power gives people freedom and hope – two things that are often lacking in patients suffering with pelvic floor dysfunction.

FM: Who is the intended audience for PH101?
SS: Current patients, prospective patients, healthcare providers who have questions about how to better treat pelvic pain – really anyone. I tailor these classes so they are understandable to the general population, but I also try to give more in-depth information than one might find elsewhere. I really want class participants to leave with a clear picture of what is going on with their bodies.

FM: Do you have to be a current patient at BBPT to go?
SS: Not at all! Most of the participants have been prospective patients looking for more information and seeing if physical therapy can be helpful for their condition. We’ve also had plenty of other healthcare providers come to learn more about the musculoskeletal component to bowel, bladder and sexual dysfunction.  Everyone is welcome!

FM: What is your favorite topic to cover?
SS: I really love the bowel lecture, “Why is Pooping so Difficult.”It’s fun to be an adult and get to talk about pooping! Potty talk is often not socially acceptable but I like to open the floor to talk about issues that are often swept under the rug. I also really love our Ladies Only Night. It’s a safe place where women can come and ask any of their questions concerning pelvic health in a friendly, fun, women only environment. It almost has the feel of a girls’ night in with your friends, minus the pajamas and pillow fights.

FM: What are some of your favorite reactions from last years’ class?
SS: I love seeing “light bulbs” click on when people discover anatomical and physiological reasons why they are experiencing symptoms. People get so much bad information along the  way and often times are told everything is in their head. I love the smiles and hope on people’s faces when they hear the good news that it is not, and that there is a solution to their symptoms!

FM: What should people do who are interested in taking the class?
SS: They should sign up online as soon as they can at PelvicHealth101.eventbrite.com. The classes are free but space is limited so they do fill up quickly. Light refreshments will be provided. Check out our class schedule below!

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Multiple Sclerosis Awareness Week

By Fiona McMahon, DPT

MS Awareness Week 2012

The week of March 7 through March 13 is recognized as Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Awareness Week. In an effort to help raise awareness for this condition we wanted to dedicate one of our blog posts to the subject of MS, how it affects people with the disease and how we at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy work with patients with MS.

MS is reported to affect 2.3 million people worldwide. Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease that affects the ability of the nerves to send messages to the body. The typical age of onset for MS is between 20-40, however there are known cases where MS can arise later or in childhood. The immune system of people with MS begins to attack the fatty covering or insulation of the nerve cells, over time the covering of nerve cells scars down, which slows or impedes the messages sent to the body from the brain. The reason why the immune system turns on its own body is unknown and is one of the major areas of research into MS.

The symptoms of MS are variable and some are more common than others. Not everyone presents with the same systems, which is why it can take some time for someone with MS to be properly diagnosed. Common symptoms of MS include, fatigue, tingling in the arms and legs, vision issues, difficulty walking, sexual issues, and issues with bladder and bowel function. There are other symptoms associated with MS and these symptoms can change over time. What is difficult and frustrating for patients with MS as well as their health care providers, is that these symptoms are nonspecific and don’t necessarily rule out or rule in anyone specific disease, whether it be MS or something else. There is no one lab test to diagnose MS, but MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) as well as clinical findings may lead to a diagnosis of MS.

As of now, there is no cure for MS. But fortunately there are a lot of resources that can help people with MS lessen the disability caused by MS. Medicine has come a long way to alter the course of MS with disease modifying agents. Drugs now exist which can slow the progression of the disease, manage relapse, and help correct specific symptoms like depression, fatigue, and pain.

Physical therapy can help a multitude of symptoms associated with MS. Most general physical therapists are qualified to help patients with MS walk more efficiently, manage fatigue, and improve their daily function. Pelvic floor physical therapists can also help to manage specific issues such as urinary issues, bowel issues and bladder issues, as well as the symptoms mentioned above. We at Beyond Basics Physical Therapy are skilled at treating both the orthopedic and pelvic health aspects of MS. We encourage prospective patients to call our office to speak to a physical therapist if they have any questions.

Although MS is manageable, there is still a lot of work that needs to be done. A single test to diagnose MS is still not available, nor is there a cure for this disease. The National Multiple Sclerosis Society is an excellent resource if you want to learn more about MS, donate to research, participate in fundraising, or find support in your area.

 

Sources:

National Multiple Sclerosis Society. http://www.nationalmssociety.org [Accessed March 5, 2016]