How to Deal with Pelvic Floor Pain From Home

woman-in-grey-jacket-sits-on-bed-uses-grey-laptop-935743

Dear reader, 

As I sit down to write this, New York City is on PAUSE, many other cities around the world are on various forms of lock-down. As a planet, we are working to slow the spread of COVID-19, the condition caused by the novel coronavirus. Those of you who are working from and staying at home, your efforts are noble and life saving. We thank you. For those of you in pain, we see you and feel for how tough it can be to feel like you have to wait to get help. Hopefully in a short period of time this virus will have passed . Follow these simple tricks to get started on tackling your pelvic pain. 

 

Check In With Your Seat

Work from home setups can leave a lot to be desired. Designed for portability, but not ergonomics, our laptop computers can leave us curled up like little cashews or “c’s”. This position tucks our pelvis underneath us and can cause us to put extra pressure and compression through our pelvic floors, not to mention putting extra pressure on our spinal discs. Even if you only have a laptop, you can remedy this c position by imagining you are a puppy dog with a tail. You want to sit so you could wag your tail like a happy puppy. Now for some people this may actually feel a little worse, if it does, this is not the trick for you. Don’t worry I have more. 

If you can, use a portable mouse and keyboard to discourage your cashew sitting tendencies. Arrange your setup so your eye line falls just about in the middle of the monitor by elevating it on some books.  You should be able to access your keyboard with your elbows bent at 90 degrees.

Now it’s time to think about what you are sitting on. I recognize that those of us living in teeny tiny NYC apartments may not have a lot of options to think about. But keep in mind that pelvic floor pain can be counterintuitive and an overstuffed couch, may not be the best thing if your pelvic floor is overworking to stabilize your body while you are sitting. Likewise, your kitchen chair may be too firm. Play around, how does the couch cushion feel on the chair? Is a firmer seat better or worse? You may have to trial and error your way into a solution.

Move

This one is so important. Depending on where you are geographically, you may be allowed different degrees of movement. If you are currently allowed to leave your home for exercise, go for a walk. Besides breaking up the day, walking can decrease the pressure from all the sitting you have been doing, as well as increase blood flow to the pelvic floor. While the requirements for social distancing remain, ensure that you maintain a distance of 6 feet (about 2 meters) between yourself and other people and wear a homemade mask.

If you cannot walk outside, and even if you can, get up periodically throughout the day. Stretch out, do some gentle air squats if they feel good. Look for some free restorative virtual yoga classes. Movement is medicine. 

Just be Happy… Like a Happy Baby

I love this pose so much that I could write a love song to it. Honestly. It works to stretch not only your pelvic floor, but your entire posterior chain  (back of the body). 

The most traditional way to do it, is to lie on your back, bend at your hips and knees, so that your feet are in the air, and grab the outside of your feet. As you stretch bring your knees towards your armpits. Hold this pose for 10 deep, beautiful breaths.

Feel free to modify this pose. Grab on the back of your calves or behind your knees if you have tight hammies. Put a pillow between your abdomen and thighs to prevent any pinching in your hip. It’s honestly all good.

Breathe

Another super important tool in your toolbox. Deep slow breathing can calm your nervous system, which can help to decrease pelvic floor spasm and guarding. In fact, in a study by Van der Velde, it was found that stressful stimuli do cause an increase in pelvic floor tightening. Try 10 deep slow breaths throughout the day and note how you feel from both a pain and stress perspective.

We are OPEN and also offering Telehealth

For those of you who are ready to get started NOW. You can. We are currently offering office evaluations and treatments, and telehealth services. Both Corey Hazama PT, DPT and Amy Stein PT, DPT are doing in person visits and telehealth visits are available with Sarah Paplanus PT, DPT.  For more information contact Beyond Basics Physical Therapy at 212- 354-2622 or check out our website: http://www.beyondbasicspt.com

 

Van der Velde J, Laan E, Everaerd W. Vaginismus, a component of a general defensive reaction. An investigation of pelvic floor muscle activity during exposure to emotion- inducing film excerpts in women with and without vaginismus. Int Urogynecol J Pelvic Floor Dysfunct. 2001; 12 (5) 328-31

 

How to Stay Whole During the Holdiays

assorted color gift boxes
Photo by Giftpundits.com on Pexels.com

Fiona McMahon PT DPT (She, her, hers)

It feels like it started early this year, didn’t it? The day after Halloween the Bryant Park Christmas fair was up and running. Little wreaths and twinkly lights adorn the downtowns of the tri-state area. Yesterday, (I am sitting down to write this blog on November 11th) I saw an adorable little boy absolutely losing his mind with joy over a Santa statue at my local drug store. It was excessively adorable. It’s a sweet time of year, filled with beauty and love, but it can also be a super stressful time of year filled with obligations, travel, shopping, expectations, and the bittersweet longing for those who cannot celebrate with us this year. In short, the holidays are loaded. There are elements of the holiday that will never not be stressful. It is stressful to fling yourself from event to event while trying to maintain some modicum of self-care, but in this blog, we will discuss practical tips to protect your holiday and better yet your peace of mind during this time of year.

Boundaries

Oh the B-word. Boundaries. Much like a fence, boundaries can be protective and can provide your friends and family with a clear set of expectations for how you want to be treated and what they can and cannot expect from you. Sounds a tad harsh, but what’s harsher is getting upset with your loved ones when they do things that they had no idea would bother you. Boundaries should be clear cut and judgement free. A good example, for most families is discussing politics. If political discussions, especially if your family’s views vary greatly from yours, are stressful, you may want to set up some boundaries around it. You may say, “ I would prefer not to discuss politics tonight at the holiday table, if we do discuss politics, I will excuse myself to the living room”. Excusing yourself to the living room is not meant to be punitive. You are not punishing your relatives for discussing politics, you are simply excusing yourself from a potentially divisive and argument starting topic that will upset you. You cannot control the actions of others, but you can control how you react to those actions, hopefully with kindness while keeping your boundaries intact.

Another way to set boundaries is setting boundaries with your time. For most of us with the crazy schedule of the holidays there are certain rituals that fall by the wayside. It’s okay to have some elements of your routine be non negotiable, like your 30 minute jog or morning meditation session, Holding onto the activities that bring you peace can best allow you to show up and be present for all of the holiday festivities.

Planning

You don’t have to do it all. Not every party requires your attendance, not every bake sale requires your dessert, and you can allow some things to slide. At the beginning of the season decide what is really important to you. Is the “coats for kids” fundraiser really meaningful? Put it up on your list, but could you let your work friend’s party slide? Cool, buy yourself some extra time. Look at your weeks and decide what is not only realistic, but healthy for you. Maybe if there are a few parties you want to go to, you could give yourself a day or two off from your workout routine and (here’s the important part) be kind to yourself about taking a break. You can say no. I believe holiday cheer to be a finite resource so save it up for what matters to you.

Diet

Loaded, loaded, loaded topic. But the holidays are where we can fall into some really unhealthy eating habits, which can make us feel really crappy. Try to mix in some healthy food with your holiday treats. I’ve quoted this Oscar Wilde quote (which I have misattributed to Mark Twain, full disclosure), “everything in moderation, including moderation.”, which I think is an excellent mantra to take into the holidays. Sometimes you gotta have a little fun and indulge, but being mindful of how much and how often, can help us to feel our best during the holidays. Make sure along with your cookies you are getting some vegetables and lean protein to keep your blood sugar stable. Limit alcohol to the best of your abilities as it can decrease the quality of your sleep, to avoid the trap of over caffeination and requiring a nightcap to sleep.

Self care

Leave time if you can for exercise and movement and time just for yourself. It allows you time to check in with yourself and see how you are doing as well as time to sit back and reflect/appreciate the holidays.

Self Kindness

The holidays and year’s end can be a time when we look back at our year and evaluate how far we have come. It can be easy to dwell on our shortcomings, and although they can provide important direction for our future goals, it is also a brilliant time to reflect on your achievements. You have successfully gotten yourself through another year, Heck! Another decade, where you have grown and learned valuable lessons, which makes you all that more deserving of some good ol’ holiday cheer.

Happy Holidays from the Beyond Basics Family.

hollerday!

 

 

How to Start a New Exercise Program When You’re Feeling Intimidated

How to Start a New Exercise Program When You’re Feeling Intimidated

woman stretching on ground
Photo by Jonathan Borba on Pexels.com

Kierstin Elliott

Maybe you were an avid gym-goer, cross fitter, or yogi and then you got injured. Or maybe fitness has never been a part of your life, but now your doctor or PT has told you that a fitness regimen is necessary in order to help you feel like yourself again. Whatever the case may be, you just don’t know where to start, or you feel intimidated to return to what you were doing in the past because that is how you got injured in the first place. My advice is to start slowly. Educate yourself on how and why you got injured and what the next steps are on your road to recovery. Set goals on what you need to accomplish and build a plan to achieve them. Last but not least, train smartly. If you follow this check list, then you should definitely feel more confident moving forward!

It is imperative when you are transitioning from injury rehab to the fitness world, or starting a new exercise program for the first time, that you build a foundation. It is so crucial you stay true to your journey and not compare yourself to others. Trust that progress takes time. Resist the urge to jump right into something new if you’re unsure about form, alignment, and technique.

The first step would be to invest in private sessions. Educate yourself on what you’re getting into and find an expert in what you want to master. Having a coach who devotes the entire hour to your body and your needs will help you garner a deeper understanding of how your breath, body, and mind connect. Learning the proper form with a watchful eye on alignment, will ensure you have a strong foundation to move forward or join group classes.

Once you’ve gained confidence with your new (or old) exercise program, set some fitness goals. You’ve laid a strong foundation and now it’s time to build a skyscraper! Do you want to improve strength, flexibility, endurance? Once you have clear goals set, create a timeline. Establishing a realistic timeline will hold you accountable to sticking with your exercise program and crushing your goals!

The point I’ll end with is to train smartly. No matter what discipline you train in, if you are not focused on form, alignment, and breath control, you are only setting yourself up for future injuries. If you are in a group class, don’t be afraid to ask questions if something is unclear, doesn’t feel quite right, or if you know you need a modification. If you are doing an at home workout on your own, try to do it in front of a mirror to check out your form. If there’s no mirror accessible, simply take it slow and use the knowledge you’ve acquired from a trainer, coach, or PT. Take notes. Practice. Your exercises won’t be perfect the first time you attempt them. Be patient and mindful. It’s all about the journey 🙂

Gentle Tai Chi with Dr. Coady on July 13th!

 

Fiona McMahon PT, DPT

On Thursday July 13th, 2017, Beyond Basics Physical Therapy will be hosting the second of its 4 free movement classes: Gentle Tai Chi with Dr. Coady. Explore the smooth and graceful movements of Tai Chi with long time friend of the practice and pelvic health expert, Dr. Deborah Coady.

Tai Chi has been shown repeatedly to benefit its practitioners in multiple ways. Multiple studies gathered in this data analysis (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3085832) demonstrate the myriad ways Tai Chi can improve health, from bone health, to cardiopulmonary function, to overall quality of life, and fall prevention). Don’t miss this fantastic chance to see if Tai Chi is the right addition to your healthcare routine.

Register here today!

Summer Movement Class

BBPT Health Tip: Diaphragmatic Breathing

just-breathe-in-cloudsFiona McMahon DPT, PT

WE LOVE DIAPHRAGMATIC BREATHING! We do, we really do and we hope you will too. What is diaphragmatic breathing you ask? Diaphragmatic breathing is a form of deep breathing where you breath deeply into your stomach. As you breath in, you will actually see your belly extend and get bigger, and as you breath out, your belly will return to it’s old spot. It’s not like our typical breathing patterns where we breath from the chest; it is a much more deep and deliberate breath.

Why We love Diaphragmatic Breathing

Diaphragmatic breathing accomplishes a lot in the body. First of all, it supplies the body with a large dose of oxygen, which is pretty obvious, but it is a much more robust breath than a simple chest breath.

Diaphragmatic breathing also works wonders on the tissues of both the abdomen and the pelvic floor. By taking a big diaphragmatic breath in, the diaphragm lowers and provides a gentle stretch to the tissues and organs of the belly as well as the pelvic floor. As you breath in you are actually providing a nice stretch to the pelvic floor.

Deep breaths can also calm down the nervous system and allow you to better relax. When you are more relaxed your body can attend to the day to day tasks such as digestion and healing. It really is amazing what some deep breaths can do.

How to breathe diaphragmatically

Start off by putting one hand on your chest, at about the area of your breastbone. Place the other hand on your stomach. You can do diaphragmatic breathing just about anywhere, so get in a position that is comfortable for you. Start by slowly breathing in. In order to tell if you are using your diaphragm, you should feel the hand on your stomach move more than the hand on your chest. As you breath in, bring your awareness to your ribs and feel them expand out to the side and back.  Finish by slowly breathing out. The out breather should be longer than the inhale. It is really that easy.

How does one actually use diaphragmatic breathing?

Really you can use it in anyway you need too. Some people find it tremendously helpful to do 10 diaphragmatic breaths every hour, while others employ deep breathing techniques in times of stress or pain. The important thing about diaphragmatic breathing, or any exercise for that matter is consistency. Try to at least get in 20 deep breaths a day.